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Dangerous Digital Business Myth: We're Always Connected
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jagibbons
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jagibbons,
User Rank: Ninja
1/2/2014 | 12:09:21 PM
A very real problem
If CIOs or other leaders haven't experienced this, it probably isn't easy to remember that connectivity in the US not only lags other highly connected nations, but is still fairly well limited to major population areas and transportation avenues. When you work with folks in very rural parts of this nation, this problem is very real. When you travel to less developed countries on a regular basis, this problem is very real. Herein lies the dilemma around VDI and not storing data on the mobile device. If your employee doesn't have network access, they are not able to work if there's nothing cached locally. When building a mobile strategy, security of the device must be balanced so that productivity isn't completely hampered in the quest to keep data safe and secure on the server.
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
1/2/2014 | 1:09:25 PM
Re: A very real problem
Very good point on the tension here between access and security. And you don't have to venture into "very" rural to lose cellular connectivity. Plenty of pockets of merely suburban neighborhoods don't have strong enough cellular coverage to do data work. 
jagibbons
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jagibbons,
User Rank: Ninja
1/2/2014 | 1:18:22 PM
Re: A very real problem
It was only until the last year or so that my neighborhood in a nearly urban area got a strong enough Verizon signal for my phone to work routinely using 4G. I still default to WiFi whenever I can, but the fact remains that businesses need to plan for low or zero bandwidth for their employees.
RobPreston
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RobPreston,
User Rank: Author
1/2/2014 | 12:17:30 PM
Another Chump
Yeah, I'm one of those chumps who still feels a bit guilty using my iPhone to check competitors' prices and offerings while shopping in a store. But stores better start targeting the non-chumps with in-store online promotions and other incentives to get consumers to show up in their stores. 
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
1/2/2014 | 2:23:36 PM
Hotel connectivity
I am sure Royal Carribean will have many passengers willing to pay the flat fee. But I wish more hotels would simply bake access into the hotel price. I am seeing a lot of hotel ads that say "Complimentary Wi-Fi -- in the lobby." C'mon.
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
1/2/2014 | 2:48:54 PM
Re: Hotel connectivity
Royal Caribbean's business model makes sense to me given the satellite capacity expense, but on the hotel level I completely agree -- this is one of my great travel annoyances that the pricier the hotel the more likely you are to be charged for WiFi. By device.
WKash
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WKash,
User Rank: Author
1/2/2014 | 3:07:05 PM
Employers facing challenge
One major employer to add to your list is Uncle Sam.  Federal agencies understand the value of, and need for, mobile employees who can access data while performing services in the field. Put aside defense, homeland security and law enforcment agencies (where security remains a major stumbling block to going mobile.) Even CIOs at civilian agencies -- from the Dept.s of Agriculture to Veterans Affairs -- find it hard to overcome a host of technical and policy hurdles that keep them from connecting employees wirelessly to work.

 
cbabcock
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cbabcock,
User Rank: Strategist
1/2/2014 | 3:13:24 PM
Please, embedded wireless access in the hotel bill
Hotel connectivity, even in a hotel contracted to help stage a cloud event next door, can be an iffy thing. As at CloudConnect in Chicago. Instead of being baked into the price of the room, it was a sign up with fee each 24 hours, and if you forgot the precise moment you signed up, you might be silently logged off the network with no notice. Everything appears to be working normally as you call up pages out of the system cache, but in fact you are in a disconnected room alone, with no way to communicate. Do hotel managements understand the nature of their clientele these days?
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
1/2/2014 | 5:24:04 PM
Re: Please, embedded wireless access in the hotel bill
It's kind of like when airlines charge for luggage: business travelers have only so many alternatives. But it's certainly breeding ill will with customers.
Li Tan
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Li Tan,
User Rank: Ninja
1/3/2014 | 2:55:27 AM
Re: Please, embedded wireless access in the hotel bill
That's exactly the problem nowadays - it seems that the mindset of many business operators is still in the old days. They do not fully understand the client/end-user's behavior and corresponding expectations. In the hotel even if the WiFi is free, you need to sign-up every XX hours to maintain the access, which is not convenient for end-users. Wouldn't it be possible to have the sign-up only once before the guest checks out?
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
1/2/2014 | 5:05:46 PM
Spectrum the new real estate
The spectrum crunch is very real and very scary for carriers. The US government could help, if it were fuctional. As it's not, for now, the only way for carriers to really regulate usage is to phase out unlimited plans and raise prices, while feverishly adding Wi-Fi as a helper tech where feasible.
Whoopty
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Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
1/3/2014 | 8:50:33 AM
Remote everywhere
Remote and rural areas are problematic the world over when it comes to internet. Even being under half a mile from my nearest phone exchange, my connection is barely scraping the national average because it's somewhat rural. Those that find themselves much further afield struggle to even get basic access.

Fortunately the 4g rollout in this country is helping 3g spread to more remote areas, but it's a slow burn. 
asksqn
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asksqn,
User Rank: Ninja
1/4/2014 | 5:59:09 PM
Nothing Like Shooting Yourself in the Foot
Providing wifi access at the retail level for customers may sound like a great idea to those decisionmakers who have never stepped onto a sales floor but the reality is quite different.  Case in point:  Sears pushes its employees (and gauges progress or lack thereof) to persuade customers to agree to "Store to Home," which is simply the name of the program to order online and ship in from another store merchandise that is out of stock.  It's beautiful marketing slogan/soundbyte to be able to brag that "we never run out of stock" (because of S2H), but giving customers wifi access right there on the sales floor negates (and takes money out of the employees paycheck) because the customers are ordering merch online for themselves instead of using salespeople. 
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
1/6/2014 | 12:36:53 PM
Re: Nothing Like Shooting Yourself in the Foot
That's a powerful example of why "omnichannel" is easy to like in concept and very hard to do in reality.


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