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Do Your Employees Dress For Failure?
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Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
1/3/2014 | 10:36:40 AM
Suits Don't Equal Success
I am going to respectfully disagree with Bennett. The picture he paints sounds like the world of Don Draper, long gone. I applaud his former employer's effort to help employees communicate wisely and treat each other with respect, but I don't think making people wear suits will create better business results. While some degree of professionalism must be retained (think neat, not slobby,) many IT pros and other line of business execs lead their organizations skillfully while wearing jeans.

I just worked with a diverse team that included IT, editorial and business execs to relaunch this site and we were all in different geographies, many of us working at home. What we wore never entered into our results. Treating each other with respect mattered greatly. Who wants to go back to the days of dress dictates? Not me.    
RobPreston
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RobPreston,
User Rank: Author
1/3/2014 | 10:38:51 AM
Old School
The ship has sailed on wearing suits at work, outside specific kinds of companies, roles, and occasions. That requirement wouldn't make my work environment any more productive; it would just be odd. However, both intra- and inter-company communications need a substantial upgrade. People don't take the time to write clearly and concisely. More problematic, they don't take the time to read and listen. 
bquillen280
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bquillen280,
User Rank: Strategist
1/3/2014 | 10:49:09 AM
Re: Suits Don't Equal Success
Laurianne,

I respect your opinion and certainly concur that suits are not necessary for remote workers.  But, within an office environment, I feel that ties and at least blazers for men set a tone that begets respect, and in turn, productivity. 

Of course, I attended a college where ties and jackets were required for class. What I see on college campuses today are appalling. 

 
bquillen280
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bquillen280,
User Rank: Strategist
1/3/2014 | 10:59:24 AM
Re: Old School
Rob,

I definitely agree with your last two statements: "People don't take the time to write clearly and concisely. More problematic, they don't take the time to read and listen."

But, I also think that requiring gentlemen to wear at least blazers and ties would improve the tone of an office environment.  I have had people tell me how much they appreciate a man wearing a tie, as it shows respect for them; it actually gives them a bit of a lift for the day.

So, I say break out your ties -- long or bow (but not clip on!) -- and see what the reaction is at your office.

Bennett

 

 

 

 
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
1/3/2014 | 11:04:41 AM
Re: Suits Don't Equal Success
It's all about flexibility. I have worked in offices dominated by jeans and offices that dressed a bit more formally. You're right that leaders need to set a tone in an office, I just think they can do it without wearing jackets. The actions often speak louder than the wardrobe.

 
IMjustinkern
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IMjustinkern,
User Rank: Strategist
1/3/2014 | 11:12:53 AM
Re: Suits Don't Equal Success
I fail to see how putting on a tie makes someone a better writer (and thus, leads to sharper business acumen). 
Ariella
IW Pick
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Ariella,
User Rank: Ninja
1/3/2014 | 11:31:04 AM
Re: Suits Don't Equal Success
Dress codes vary widely. I remember going to one place that specified that, while they were casual dress, they drew the line at ripped jeans and tank tops. The bank I currently use seems to have a fairly flexible dress code, and some of the women wear sleeveless tops, but one of the tellers said they were considering an incentive plan with a kind of uniform. The local Chase bank has a uniform in place with its signature blue color mandated for tops. Does it run better as a result? I don't know, but I suppose people expect a certain standard for banks, which are traditionally conservative institutions. 
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Ninja
1/3/2014 | 11:34:40 AM
Re: Old School
@Bennett "Men were to exhibit good manners and ambition. We were also required to wear suits and ties, even encouraged to wear hats." Now that makes me think of old movies and novels set in the 30s-50s. . Supposedly JFK set the trend for leaving hats off altogether. But the thing about men's hats was that they were supposed to be worn outside and then taken off inside; not doing so was considered a breach of manners. Women, on the other hand, could keep their hats on in a restaurant, though they likely took them off for work if they were secretaries.
bquillen280
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bquillen280,
User Rank: Strategist
1/3/2014 | 11:39:08 AM
Re: Old School
Ariella,

Ah yes, men's hats should be removed once in a building and certainly in an elevator with ladies present.  I have three fur fedoras -- fur, not wool, mind you, and two straw hats for spring and summer.  My clients in Bermuda and Charleston, SC, seem to appreciate them.  Bennett
Shane M. O'Neill
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Shane M. O'Neill,
User Rank: Author
1/3/2014 | 12:16:10 PM
Suit and tie of the mind
I think you are stuck in a bygone era, but that doesn't mean your tips aren't still important. I agree with your emphasis on clear communication and a good attitude. Who would argue against that? And sometimes the clothes you wear can make you feel more focused and confident. But a suit and tie? It's overkill and archaic and strange. People would think you're either stubbornly stuck in the past or trying to be ironic. A fleet of suits woud also be a creepy return to the "man in the gray flannel suit" era of bland conformity. We've come too far for that.
Yet I also agree that shorts and flip flops are sloppy and give the appearance that you aren't taking work seriously. I vote for a middle ground of presentable/business casual, depending on your role. But you should always keep your mind as sharp as a suit and tie, even if you're wearing a t-shirt. :)
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