Comments
Windows XP Won't Go Quietly
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Somedude8
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Somedude8,
User Rank: Ninja
1/7/2014 | 2:10:32 PM
Re: windows xp
This is exactly the part that worries me!
DDURBIN1
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DDURBIN1,
User Rank: Ninja
1/7/2014 | 2:05:02 PM
Re: Not broke then don't fix it
@gfouts15,, Apparently you must work where money is overly abundant to the IT department.  How does one get your job?
m.c.crockett
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m.c.crockett,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/7/2014 | 1:58:20 PM
One Windows Application
I continue to run Windows XP in a virtual machine to support one application.  I don't see any pressing need to upgrade to a newer version of the Windows operating system.  Upgrading Windows isn't a cost effective option.
gfouts15
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100%
gfouts15,
User Rank: Guru
1/7/2014 | 1:57:47 PM
Re: Not broke then don't fix it
If your job is to manage IT infrastructure and you failed to plan for this or any other technology changes, either you are incompetent, without vision, without power or a combination of these.  This isn't something that just came up.  This is the CIO/CTO's job to manage technology and the transition of such!  All this is really doing is exposing many CIO/CTO's poor decisions and lack of planning.  Seriously, if all you ever had to do was install software once and be done, anyone could do it.  Apparently too many in IT positions of power don't know what they are supposed to be doing there.
DDURBIN1
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DDURBIN1,
User Rank: Ninja
1/7/2014 | 1:37:17 PM
Not broke then don't fix it

XP does a lot of things very well.  The old adage "if its not broken don't fix it" comes to mind particularly in business.  If you have a hotel chain with say 1000+ XP machines available for customers to use the cost to replace them is significant with what advantage?  A Win7 machine won't do anything better that the XP machine did for customers, mostly browse the web and check email.  While a Win8 machine will just give the hotel's support personnel migraines.  Microsoft has already forced this hotel chain to install an alternate browser (Chrome or FireFox) since Microsoft only allows I.E. 8 on XP.  The chain will probable look at Chromebooks as the XP replacement.

jrehg337
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jrehg337,
User Rank: Strategist
1/7/2014 | 1:28:04 PM
Another scare, similar to the last
This reminds me of all the work around making sure Y2K wasn't going to bite. Most won't see any big difference when the support lapses. Actually, I might finally get my pc to quit trying to install the same 2 updates unsuccessfully for the past few months.

From my experience most malicious software gets installed because someone clicked something they shouldn't have, and that won't change no matter what version you're running.
Trike
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Trike,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/7/2014 | 12:12:20 PM
Re: XP Wont Die Easily
Lots of businesses still used punchcards, even into the new century. Inertia is a powerful thing. But even as a consumer, I'd run XP before I ever considered Win8, even if Microsoft gave me the OS *and* the PC it ran on for free. It really is a nightmare to use.
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
1/7/2014 | 11:41:10 AM
windows xp
Next time you are running errands, count how many times you see XP in a retail or hospitality setting -- store counter, hotel desk, etc. The results will surprise you. Companies have XP deployed in many customer-facing settings, still.
Whoopty
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Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
1/7/2014 | 10:29:15 AM
Re: XP Wont Die Easily
As gmtrmt pointed out, I think the redundant hardware is often the problem. Moving to Windows 7 or 8 is a reasonable upgrade even for office machines and there may even need to be a change from 32 bit to 64 bit processors, which could mean an upgrade for even somewhat recent machines if they were on the lower end of the performance scale when they were purchased. 
gmtrmt
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gmtrmt,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/7/2014 | 9:59:26 AM
XP Wont Die Easily
From experience the problem is not apathy. Instead many businesses have encumbant systems that rely on specific technology being in place. It is these systems not the basic desktop machine, that are most at risk and that require more than simply popping in a windows 8 CDROM, whats more as these systems can be around 10 years old, their specifications need upgrading too which means more expense and frustration as old systems get upgraded to new. My advice is take any old XP machines off the network or protect them from being web enabled, take out the CDROM, disk and USB ports to minimise the ability for people to access and embed viruses and other exploits.
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