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Intel CEO: 'Make Everything Smart'
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mak63
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mak63,
User Rank: Ninja
1/11/2014 | 6:08:14 PM
Re: IofT and privacy paranoia
@Thomas


"Make everything smart"

A plan would also be making human beings smart. And yes, like you said, it'll be expensive, complicated and less secure ( for lying politicians)
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
1/8/2014 | 1:08:48 AM
Re: IofT and privacy paranoia
I agree and it is a complicated situation to find ourselves in. Consumers love to be able to make financial transactions through their computers rather than having to stand in queues -- it is efficient. However, it also opens them up to phishing etc and then the need to gain more information to help protect online activities becomes important, same might happen with IoT as well.

 
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
1/8/2014 | 12:29:32 AM
Re: Backdoors dynamics
The whole idea that a backdoor entry point was created is pretty interesting. I wonder, wouldn't a company (willingly or unwillingly) fight against the creations of backdoors since these backdoors could also be found by criminals to inflict financial harm to a company's customers?
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
1/8/2014 | 12:19:05 AM
Re: Where's the demand for wearables?
I think if smart devices are going to just remain "overpriced concepts" without any value, such as a watch that costs $300, yes 6 years is not going to bring about any revolution. If value can be matched with the dollar figure then I don't see any reason why these wearable devices would not be able to become mainstream item in 3 years even. 
Li Tan
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Li Tan,
User Rank: Ninja
1/7/2014 | 10:40:19 PM
Re: IofT and privacy paranoia
The Internet of Things looks more and more popular nowadays. It brings a lot of space for potential business growth. Intel is a traditional hardware giant and started to dive into the mobile/Internet of Things world. I would keep my finger crossed and see how it will perform. Another concern from my side is that, if everything is networked, how the security will be handled? Somehow I feel a little bit nervous that the furniture, home appliances, etc. around me just "talk" to each other and exchange the information, which is not visible for me.
cbabcock
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cbabcock,
User Rank: Strategist
1/7/2014 | 7:28:53 PM
Will snopping stop at electric meter?
On the one hand, I'd like to see everyone getting a better handle on how they're using electricity and use it more efficiently, which the Internet of Things will aid and abet. On the other, who wants the utility company, and all the people its willing to sell information to, snooping beyond your meter?
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
1/7/2014 | 4:38:33 PM
Re: IofT and privacy paranoia
I would buy a "stupid TV" immediately, if I didn't already have one.
Shane M. O'Neill
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Shane M. O'Neill,
User Rank: Author
1/7/2014 | 4:16:06 PM
Re: IofT and privacy paranoia
Smart is the new Stupid. :)
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
1/7/2014 | 4:13:34 PM
Re: IofT and privacy paranoia
>One thing's for sure, the next couple decades will be a busy time in the internet security business.

"Make everything smart" is another way of saying "make everything more expensive, more complicated, and less secure." Sounds like a plan.
Kristin Burnham
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Kristin Burnham,
User Rank: Author
1/7/2014 | 3:37:52 PM
Re: IofT and privacy paranoia
I'm with Shane. Lots of potential to connect us in some really cool ways, but at what price? One parallel may be the way privacy and security has evolved with Facebook. There were more controls two years ago than there are now to protect your privacy. Little by little Facebook has opened it up, and without people making too much of a stink. I wonder if and when people will accept the quid-pro-quo of connected devices and privacy, and whether it will be as much of an issue years from now as it is today.
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