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PaaS Is Dead. Long Live PaaS
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Ruslan Synytsky
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Ruslan Synytsky,
User Rank: Strategist
1/25/2014 | 9:58:25 PM
Next gen of container based PaaSes
Krish, thanks for the article.

Absolutely agree that PaaS history has different ages of evolution. I believe it makes sense to add the link to our 3 years old vision about PaaS 2.0.

Also it's worth to mention that Jelastic is the pioner platform that uses containers from the first days of the architectural design. Now it's "must have" architectural element of a mature PaaS.
cbabcock
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cbabcock,
User Rank: Strategist
1/21/2014 | 7:17:37 PM
The lines will blur
Re: Stratustician, "PaaS will really just evolve..." I can agree with that statement. The lines are likely to blur considerably, with most IaaS offering PaaS-like deverloper services and PaaS taking on many of the optoins of IaaS. The definitions are not hard and fast. They are more NIST's descriptions in 2009-2010 of what existed as we first started talking about cloud computing.
Stratustician
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Stratustician,
User Rank: Ninja
1/20/2014 | 1:35:36 PM
How will they use it?
I think that PaaS will really just evolve depending on how we see the market start to really take advantage of cloud.  If we see more SaaS style adoption, PaaS services might evolve to be a simple sandbox to run applications, without really building out too much more of the service.  If it is used for a testing ground for developers, we might see it morphed into a fully-stocked IaaS solution that offers some of the current basics of PaaS.
chipchilders
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chipchilders,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/16/2014 | 8:29:40 PM
It's not the Death of PaaS, it's just getting put in the right place
I'm certain that we aren't seeing the "death" of PaaS, but are seeing a reality develop in the market around it's relative import and the value of different approaches to supporting application owners.  "Pure" PaaS solutions are certainly valuable under the right conditions, but come with all the same implementation and learning curve challenges inherent in any new and complex technology.  More importantly, they often require rethinking the applications themselves, which is something that I find hard to swallow as an engineer. When you step back and look at the evolution of IT in a more general way, one stark reality stands out...  the long tail.  Enterprise developers need to find ways to take advantage of the enormous value possible with orchestration and abstraction, but in ways that bridge the gap between the future and the current realities.

In my opinion, Amazon, Google and Microsoft have it right...  they offer the power of modular services (think RDS, DynamoDB, etc...), coupled with composition *options* (call this the "PaaS" if you want to) for the application owners is the path forward.
philwhln
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philwhln,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/16/2014 | 6:47:42 PM
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
1/16/2014 | 4:24:00 PM
Re: PaaS is evolving to a higher state
Krishnan, thanks for weighing in, and thanks for the link to the explanation on Docker.
iamkrishnan
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iamkrishnan,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/16/2014 | 2:21:10 PM
Re: PaaS is evolving to a higher state
I would be ok with argument that says IaaS will take advantage of PaaS layer to offer a more integrated offering because PaaS needs some infrastructure to run atop (IaaS or traditional servers). I am pushing hard because they seem to dismiss the very usefulness of PaaS itself. This is a good intro to Docker http://www.slideshare.net/dotCloud/why-docker2bisv4
iamkrishnan
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iamkrishnan,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/16/2014 | 2:18:42 PM
Re: We are simplifying too much
Johan,

I read your post. Good post. It will align with what I am talking about if you combine Layer 2 with layer 3 into one stack. In the current version, it aligns with my orchestration of containers flavor but not sure how you will fit Google App Engine kinda approach to PaaS.
cbabcock
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cbabcock,
User Rank: Strategist
1/16/2014 | 12:49:38 PM
PaaS is evolving to a higher state
It's not generally understood what containerization (example, Docker) is doing for cloud workload deployments. I don't think I"ve done a very good job of explaining it myself. (But I will keep trying). In the long run, Reuven Cohen hsa a point; PaaS will be built into most cloud platforms. Today, PaaS is showing the most rapid evolution of the different forms of cloud computing and it's a bad call  to say it's about to disappear. Anyone disagree? How about Jay Lyman, at Forrester Research?
JohanDenHaan
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JohanDenHaan,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/16/2014 | 2:54:02 AM
We are simplifying too much
> It's natural for similarities between platforms to cause confusion, but a premature obituary for PaaS will end up hurting an industry that could otherwise derive great value from ongoing development.


I agree with your conclusion. We see the confusion all around: everything is called a PaaS nowadays, not in the least because vendors want to be part of the "hype". I think the problem starts with the fact that we, as an industry, are still using the three flavors of cloud (IaaS, PaaS, SaaS) as a way to describe the landscape and categorize offerings. This is too much of a simplification of reality nowadays.

It will be helpfull in my opinion to clarify the different flavours of cloud platforms a bit more. I did a first attempt in making a layered model that distinguishes between different flavours of IaaS, PaaS, and SaaS, including their target audience.

Do you think your distinction between PaaS by service orchestration and PaaS by container orchestration aligns with this model, or did I miss something?


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