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Obama Outlines 5 Surveillance Reforms
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WKash
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WKash,
User Rank: Author
1/17/2014 | 5:23:27 PM
NSA and the President
The President will no doubt be accused of punting on the decision regarding the bulk collection of American's phone records.  What was interesting to see is a US president laying out a set of principles on intelligence gathering in a public document that would have been unimaginable a few years ago -- or at least before the Edward Snowden revelations.  I also believe that the men and women at NSA who live every day worrying whether they've done enough to avoid another 9/11 got what amounted to a pretty strong endorsement from their commander in chief.

 
mrtylerlevinsky
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mrtylerlevinsky,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/18/2014 | 4:44:28 PM
Re: NSA and the President
so the media finally speaks of something that has been around since the dawn of internet...

and the industry collaborates in its design and development...

 

who is the guilty ones?
moarsauce123
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moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
1/19/2014 | 8:29:01 AM
Utter disappointment
So the word is to do a wee bit less of the insane spying and data collection while still have this artifical FISC rubber stamp everything. Who thought Obama is worse than Bush!?

The only way to end this mess is to

- repeal the Patriot Acts

- defund NSA and other agencies that are not FBI or CIA

- centralize national security under the FBI

- centralize foreign intelligence including that of the military under the CIA

- dissolve the FISC and have the FBI and CIA seek search warrants from courts with judges that were elected by the public in free and democratic elections. Only the records obtained through a warrant are allowed to be stored by the FBI or CIA.

- have an annual review of all programs and determine actual results, programs that do not deliver any results will be ended.


This will not only make national security more effective, more organized, and more focused on results, it will also keep any self-serving three letter agencies out of the mix. On top of that, it will save billions of dollars that are now wasted on folks playing WoW or dysfunctional data centers. And the best, this will make the US a much safer place than it currently is!
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
1/19/2014 | 1:27:38 PM
Re: NSA and the President
Exactly, and the trade-off between keeping businesses safe (not causing them loses) vs. keeping people safe is becoming harder day by day because of the pace at which technology is moving. The good news is that now everyone is looking at this issue and I guess this attention will bring about a framework that has real value.
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
1/19/2014 | 1:39:09 PM
Re: Utter disappointment
Interesting idea that might or might not work, I am not sure. Won't all this make it more expensive to do the same things? Since in a way specialization would be finished and a handful of agencies will have to take care of everything under the sky.
Whoopty
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Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
1/21/2014 | 6:50:06 AM
Placate
While I'm glad to see Obama offering some privacy protection to those overseas, it's not like added rights have helped Americans steer clear of the NSA filtering. He also seems to think that the problem was what the NSA was using the data for, rather than that it was being collected in the first place, which is obviously not the case. 
WKash
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WKash,
User Rank: Author
1/21/2014 | 8:29:24 PM
Still not mentioned
WhIn particular, the current framework does not fully
There's still a curious absence of attention on the other surveillance giant at work in the market: Private industries that routinely track more information about consumers than the NSA does.  Consumers still have little control over how their information is collected, used,and shared with third parties for marketing purposes. While the government has overstepped its bounds in collecting phone and other metadata, private industry continues to collect our spending data, our whereabouts, and countless other pieces of personal digital data.  Let's get that into the debate.


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