Comments
Windows vs. Mac: Desktop Battle Lines Drawn
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Page 1 / 5   >   >>
melgross
50%
50%
melgross,
User Rank: Ninja
2/3/2014 | 9:36:22 PM
Re: The question of why
I have no argument with that. Each UI is best for a specific purpose. But sticking them both together is a bad idea, despite the reasons they had for doing it.
rradina
50%
50%
rradina,
User Rank: Ninja
2/2/2014 | 2:21:43 PM
Re: The question of why
"it's obviously an attempt to get people to use the Modern UI"

 

You answered your own question.  The modern UI is great on a touch device.  The classic UI is great on a desktop.  Force folks to use both on every device...  we're just Monday morning quarterbacking at this point.
rradina
50%
50%
rradina,
User Rank: Ninja
2/2/2014 | 2:14:21 PM
Re: The question of why
I'd prefer to not debate this topic with you.  I don't know what else to say because I don't think either of us will make progress convincing the other.
melgross
50%
50%
melgross,
User Rank: Ninja
2/2/2014 | 12:38:56 PM
Re: The question of why
We have to keep in mind that Microsoft was terribly rushed here. They needed to come out with an OS that people would buy on tablets, and phones too. They were just so far behind, that they were in serious trouble. No one can rush this though, and Microsoft isn't known for quick moves. How long would it have taken them to re-work Win 7 enough for tablets and phones so as to have it work well all around? Years more time than they had. They basically went to the ZUNE HD and lifted the more primitive UI from that, along with the programming model, and worked it up. But they still had a problem with convincing people to use it. Win Phone 7+ is evidence of that. While I don't know exactly at what point they decided to do Win 8 the way they did, it's obviously an attempt to get people to use the Modern UI, in the hope it would stimulate both tablet and phone sales. Being so close to the project, and having the; "Wow! This is a GREAT idea! It will solve all of our problems." syndrome we see all too often, blinded them to the major defects of the idea itself, not only the implementation. While a few people do love it, most everyone either has a slight dislike, to a strong hatred. So much so that Microsoft seems to be backing off on some of the more important points.
jgherbert
50%
50%
jgherbert,
User Rank: Ninja
2/2/2014 | 12:31:00 PM
Re: The question of why
Very odd indeed! I haven't tried on an iPad but like you, across multiple other platforms it has worked fine. Weird!
melgross
50%
50%
melgross,
User Rank: Ninja
2/2/2014 | 12:28:46 PM
Re: The question of why
I'm working on an iPad, and trying "return" which is the same thing, doesn't give a paragraph stop. Odd, it works properly on every other site.
melgross
50%
50%
melgross,
User Rank: Ninja
2/2/2014 | 12:24:45 PM
Re: The question of why
You respond in a post, and then you tell me to let it go? You really didn't need to have that last post, you could have let it go, but you didn't. jgherbert has given a good response to you that I completely agree with.
rradina
50%
50%
rradina,
User Rank: Ninja
2/2/2014 | 10:55:27 AM
Re: The question of why
8.1 on a tablet, even an 8", is pretty slick... provided only the lightest of interaction is done with the classic desktop.  For anything beyond that, a keyboard and some kind of mouse control is best.

If 8/8.1 are soley used outside of a tablet/ultrabook context, Microsoft needs to let it cook a little longer.

Regarding naming, it was an operating environment(1.0/2.0), then a graphical environment (3.0) and with 3.1 I think they called it an OS.
jgherbert
100%
0%
jgherbert,
User Rank: Ninja
2/1/2014 | 12:46:48 PM
Re: The question of why
@rradina: "Hopefully the next Windows service pack will be like the airbags that eliminated those motorized seatbelt systems."

 

No kidding. Personally I just cannot get on with Windows 8. Each time I touch it (no pun intended) I back away very shortly thereafter. To me it just proves that despite (hopefully) best intentions, having one interface for mobile and desktop Just Doesnt Work. 

I don't recall the "Operating Environment" terminology though I have no reason to doubt it. From a user perspective, we talked about "Installing Windows" as if it were a single OS, just as we do with OSX. And honestly, I don't care too much what's under the hood so long as it works for me as a user, and we don't see huge stability issues that get blamed on the nature of the Operating Environment.

One of the things that frustrates many mobile users may be on the application layer rather than the OS side of thing (preference aside), and that is that most desktop apps aren't mirrored by tablet and mobile versions of the app that allow a relatively seamless transition between platforms. The nature and ubiquity of cloud storage makes this a highly desirable feature, and I really believe that's what MS was aiming at as much as anything else. That's a good aim, but I think they missed the point along the way. We all accept that the interface will be necessarily be different between a smartphone and a desktop; it's how the data can transfer that makes for an improved user experience.
rradina
100%
0%
rradina,
User Rank: Ninja
2/1/2014 | 9:18:43 AM
Re: The question of why
When Windows 3.x ran on DOS, they called in an operating environment, not an OS.  My father has an all-in-one touchscreen desktop that runs Windows 7.  HP added a touch friendly UI on top of Win7 that makes it work in a unique way.  However, I don't think anyone, even HP or the Microcenter sales staff think it's a new OS or some hybrid merger of two operating systems.

When Windows is running a kiosk app that replaces the desktop with it's own GUI, it no longer looks like Windows and it's difficult to tell what the device is under the covers.  Would we call this a merger of two operating systems?

The reason I think this is important is because calling it two operating systems is making it sound like Microsoft put in a lot of blunderous effort and "fixing" it is a huge task.  This is similar to the FUD Microsoft spread in the 90s when it tried to defend how Internet Explorer was part of the OS and not just another application.  They claimed it  couldn't be removed or Windows woudn't be Windows.  While Microsoft did it's best to tie lots of Windows dialogs and even Explorer to the IE HTML rendering engine, I don't recall anyone suggesting they bolted two operating systems together.

The modern touch features of Windows 8 are similar to the IE rendering engine....just smoke and mirrors.  If we stop there, Microsoft has less room to squirm and there are no excuses as to why it cannot allow folks the option to enable favorite features such as a classic start button and running modern apps in desktop windows.

Win8 (not 8.1 as I believe it's miles better), is like those auto-retracting seatbelts the auto industry tried ~30 years ago.  While the safety concept was admirable, the implementaton left us all scratching our heads.  8.1 addressed a number of rough edges.  Hopefully the next Windows service pack will be like the airbags that eliminated those motorized seatbelt systems.

 
Page 1 / 5   >   >>


IT's Reputation: What the Data Says
IT's Reputation: What the Data Says
InformationWeek's IT Perception Survey seeks to quantify how IT thinks it's doing versus how the business really views IT's performance in delivering services - and, more important, powering innovation. Our results suggest IT leaders should worry less about whether they're getting enough resources and more about the relationships they have with business unit peers.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Must Reads Oct. 21, 2014
InformationWeek's new Must Reads is a compendium of our best recent coverage of digital strategy. Learn why you should learn to embrace DevOps, how to avoid roadblocks for digital projects, what the five steps to API management are, and more.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Archived InformationWeek Radio
A roundup of the top stories and trends on InformationWeek.com
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.