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NSA, British Spy Agency Collect Angry Birds Data
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D. Henschen
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D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
1/27/2014 | 6:01:58 PM
Not surprised about NSA, but what about Angry Birds?!
What's news to me is that Angry Birds has data about my "location, marital status, sexual orientation, political affiliation, or other demographic data relevant to advertisers." My son has that app, and now I realize that we all hit "I agree" too easily to all those app license agreements. Beware: there often a lot more you're agreeing to than you would suspect.
micjustin33
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micjustin33,
User Rank: Strategist
1/28/2014 | 9:04:21 AM
Re: Not surprised about NSA, but what about Angry Birds?!

NSA spies you and steals your privacy infromation through Angry Birds (among with other applications).

No privacy, no mercy. That should be NSA's slogan. It's easy to strike when they know your weakness.
Shane M. O'Neill
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Shane M. O'Neill,
User Rank: Author
1/28/2014 | 11:21:54 AM
Re: Not surprised about NSA, but what about Angry Birds?!
Yep, it's so easy to blow off smartphone app license agreements. 99% of people tap "I agree." You're not thinking about privacy and the NSA. It's a smartphone game after all!
hrutledge974
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hrutledge974,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/28/2014 | 1:16:46 PM
What about others?
What really surprises me is that we are ignoring other flagrent abuses of our privacy.  I've know for years that Google, Yahoo and Microsoft track my emails.  If I get an email from a friend vacationing in Upper Michigan.  Ads on the side of the email are about buying realestate in the Upper pennsula of Michigan.  Corprations are violating our privacy right and left.  They just haven't been caught yet.

What about other nations.  Do you really believe that Germany, France, Spain, Italy, Russia, Poland, Sweden, Norway, China, etc. are not doing the same thing the NSA is doing?  Naive people.  The only way to protect your privacy is to not put it on the Internet.

This is a made up tempest while other organizations with less oversight are doing the same or worse.
mak63
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mak63,
User Rank: Ninja
1/28/2014 | 1:29:05 PM
Angry Birds?
The only way to protect your privacy is to not put it on the Internet.
I disagree with that comment. It's like saying if I leave my car running and unlock at night, someone has the right to steal it. He doesn't.
Anyhow, I can't believe they collect data from Angry Birds. Angry Birds, really? If you tell me Candy Crush, well that will be another story.
DAVIDINIL
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DAVIDINIL,
User Rank: Strategist
1/28/2014 | 1:32:05 PM
Re: Not surprised about NSA, but what about Angry Birds?!
I have read those user acceptance agreement statements.  they don't tell you anything.  Where in the angry bird agreement does it tell me that the NSA will have access to my demographic and mapping details?  And why does Angry Birds need access to my buddy list and my location anyway?
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
1/28/2014 | 10:18:53 PM
Rovio's denial
FWIW, the best headline I saw on Rovio's response to this today was "Angry Birds Doesn't Give Data to Pigs."
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Ninja
2/1/2014 | 8:45:13 AM
Re: Not surprised about NSA, but what about Angry Birds?!
Shane, 

Have you ever diagreed to app/software license agreements? How often do you read them before agreeing? 

-Susan 


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