Comments
New Domain Names For Sale: 4 Facts
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
Lorna Garey
50%
50%
Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
6/5/2014 | 9:18:33 AM
Re: Custom Top Level Domain names
Thank you for clarifying that. Is there a term for speculatively buying a domain not trademark-related, say "pizza.com," with no intent to use it for ecommerce but rather to sell it for a profit?
jeepsjeeps
50%
50%
jeepsjeeps,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/4/2014 | 8:25:41 PM
Re: Custom Top Level Domain names
Unfortunately, you're misinformed as to the actual definition of "squatting" or "cybersquatting" on a domain. Let me help clarify...

"Cybersquatting (also known as domain squatting), according to the United States federal law known as the Anticybersquatting Consumer Protection Act, is registering, trafficking in, or using a domain name with bad faith intent to profit from the goodwill of a trademark belonging to someone else. The cybersquatter then offers to sell the domain to the person or company who owns a trademark contained within the name at an inflated price."

Good day.
Chris3B
50%
50%
Chris3B,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/27/2014 | 2:15:35 PM
Re: Impossible Domain Names
more extensions more trash

I dont think any extension can have the same value once compared with .com

 
jgherbert
50%
50%
jgherbert,
User Rank: Ninja
1/31/2014 | 11:59:26 PM
Impossible Domain Names
My biggest fear is that this whole thing just becomes unmanageable. Want to go to Target's web site?

 

target.com?

target.shop?

target.retail?

target.discount?

target.store?

etc.

 

Where does it stop? At least now, you can have a stab at "company.com"... Selfishly I kind of like that. The whole thing just ends up sounding like a massive scam to make money for registrars, not to really make it easier for end users.
jgherbert
50%
50%
jgherbert,
User Rank: Ninja
1/31/2014 | 11:56:04 PM
Domains
I saw that .io was coming out (or came out recently, I forget which). Is it wrong that I went straight away to a registrar and checked for availability of "eie.io"? Or "scorch.io"? 

 

Just me? Ok then. ;)
Rick Vidallon
50%
50%
Rick Vidallon,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/30/2014 | 9:02:47 PM
Re: Custom Top Level Domain names
Ditto That Kevin!! On that same note circa 2001 I had applied to become a limited domain registrar per the reqirement of a web application we were developing. The processing fee for simply 'submitting' the application for 'consideration' was $25,000. -- LOL- NO WAY! --

Needless to say; I passed, but did picked up an interesting tid-bit. If I had became a certified registrar our internal cost for a domain name registration would have been 25 cents per name. It's probably closer to 37 cents today. Now we all know why Go Daddy can buy those million dollar Super Bowl commercials every year!   
KevinRCasey
50%
50%
KevinRCasey,
User Rank: Moderator
1/30/2014 | 8:42:48 PM
Re: Custom Top Level Domain names
Rick, this has been the leading criticism I've heard of the gTLD expansion -- that it's exclusionary and favors deep pockets -- dating back to 2011 when I first started writing about it. It's not baseless, either. It cost $185,000 to apply to own and manage one of these gTLDs. ICANN brought in upwards of $350 million just in application fees during the initial application window.

The less-reported element is the "declining price" feature, which by design favors those willing and able to spend (potentially much) more on the domain names they want. A commonly listed benefit of the expansion is that small businesses, individuals, etc. will have more choice, but this declining-price process means those with deep pockets will have first choice.
danielcawrey
50%
50%
danielcawrey,
User Rank: Ninja
1/30/2014 | 10:57:33 AM
Re: Information about gTLDs for Website Development
It was inevitable that this expansion of domain naming would have to happen. But yes, now I can see what kind of problems there will be as a result of this.

It's no wonder it took so long for these to come to market. They are needed, but problematic issues will end up arising. 
Lorna Garey
50%
50%
Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
1/30/2014 | 10:38:26 AM
Re: Custom Top Level Domain names
I remember having a debate with a colleague years ago about the practice of squatters jumping in and buying .com names that they forsaw as possibly valuable down the road, and just sitting on them, paying the yearly fees. I don't see how that's any different from a real estate speculator buying up property hoping to make a profit. She saw the practice as shady and harmful to the growth of ecommerce. How do you think this expansion plays into that?

Seems like by increasing the volume of desirable names, squatters will need to buy more. And, I guess, in that way, it's now NOT like real estate. They're not making more land, but they can make more tlds!
Rick Vidallon
50%
50%
Rick Vidallon,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/30/2014 | 8:53:14 AM
Custom Top Level Domain names
While this is a great idea to generate cash; but the application process is inherently flawed. If Joe the plumber ever dreams of owning 'dot.plumber' for his online business name, then he needs to get in line with the 1000 pound gorilla's; ServPro, Roto-Rooter and so on. Same goes for every small business in the US.

So you want to be 'name'.realestate? HA! Forget it. And I can think of 500,000 other small business TLDs' that will be swallowed up by huge companies, large franchises and national chains.

Thinking of owning a custom (Top Level Domain names) TLD's for your business? You have better chances winning the Power Ball.  
Page 1 / 2   >   >>


IT's Reputation: What the Data Says
IT's Reputation: What the Data Says
InformationWeek's IT Perception Survey seeks to quantify how IT thinks it's doing versus how the business really views IT's performance in delivering services - and, more important, powering innovation. Our results suggest IT leaders should worry less about whether they're getting enough resources and more about the relationships they have with business unit peers.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Must Reads Oct. 21, 2014
InformationWeek's new Must Reads is a compendium of our best recent coverage of digital strategy. Learn why you should learn to embrace DevOps, how to avoid roadblocks for digital projects, what the five steps to API management are, and more.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Archived InformationWeek Radio
A roundup of the top stories and community news at InformationWeek.com.
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.