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Second Life Founder Pursues Second Chance
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WKash
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WKash,
User Rank: Author
2/3/2014 | 1:56:48 PM
Second chance
Thanks for reporting this. It will be interesting to see if the new features the 2nd time around will be enough to overcome the learning curve and latency issues that hamped Second Life.  There's still a lot of pent up interest in the government, notably from military, homeland security, and engineering folks who saw Second Life as a great way to stage mock training events.   
David F. Carr
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David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
2/3/2014 | 4:10:33 PM
Never went back
I enjoyed playing around with Second Life for as long as it took me to write a cover story about the technology and the company for one of my former employers. But even though I got really into it at the time, learning how to do scripting and graphics in the Second Life environment, I essentially never went back once the story wrapped. I found it very cool, but ultimately not that compelling or engaging.

Good observation about communities like Facebook allowing engagement with much less effort. You can have a snack, rather than a 3 course meal you have to cook yourself.
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
2/3/2014 | 4:33:44 PM
Re: Second chance
Second Life would have fared better if it had appealed to MMORPG fans, the primary proven market for such activities. Philip Rosedale, you need orcs.
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
2/3/2014 | 5:50:00 PM
Re: Second chance
Second Life always felt like a technology in search of a purpose. Here at InformationWeek we experimented with "virtual events" in a Second Life-like environment, and they didn't take off. With the technology at the time, they didn't replicate the connection of our live, in-person events (informationweek.com/conference, for the next one coming up) yet they weren't as efficient as a straight webcast or online radio chat.  

We didn't think to have orcs, Tom. 
RobPreston
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RobPreston,
User Rank: Author
2/3/2014 | 6:40:26 PM
Re: Second chance
I simply never saw the point. It had nothing to do with the sophistication of the technology or graphics; I just had no interest in adopting an avatar personna and interacting with people in a virtual world. I'd rather pick up the phone or meet someone in person. 
Li Tan
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Li Tan,
User Rank: Ninja
2/3/2014 | 8:18:47 PM
Re: Second chance
I am with you - the technology has advanced quite a lot in the past few years and the effect of PC game has amazing effect. But I never bother to play long time with it. No matter how good it is, it's a virtual world and you are interacting with computer eventually. In addition to pick up the phone and call my friends, I am more than happy to meet them and have afternoon tea together.:-)
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Ninja
2/4/2014 | 7:05:20 AM
Virtual Worlds have never been dead
Mitch, 

Virtual Worlds have never been dead. They just didn't go mainstream as we thought they would at the beginning. Education keeps on using them, like this event in Manchester, UK. 

-Susan
Drew Conry-Murray
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Drew Conry-Murray,
User Rank: Ninja
2/4/2014 | 11:01:52 AM
Re: Second chance
I think the Orcs comment is spot on. It's one thing to fix the technological elements, but Second Life never appealed to me because it was so open and amorphous. Part of the fun of an immersive experience is having an objective and a set of limitations to work within (or against). An open world where you can do anything sounds great, but then you run up against the limits of your own imagination.
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
2/4/2014 | 5:01:54 PM
Re: Never went back
In a way, Second Life suffers from the same problem as the 3D printing -- the power and capabilities are amazing, but the motivation isn't there. Games provide us with a motivation to participate that Second Life, with its open-endedness, did not. Likewise, 3D printing (as it currently exists) offers infinite possibilities in terms of creating objects, but when it comes down to it, we don't really need to custom manufacture much stuff (outside of those in the business of doing such things) on a regular basis. As a consequence, these are activities that have value, but only to a niche audience.
DavidC681
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DavidC681,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/4/2014 | 11:56:57 PM
Re: Second chance
A lot of us DO do training simulations for the US and other militaries. We just use OpenSim, or MOSES or OLIVE, rather than Second Life. It's too damned expensive and they have the worst customer service EVER. And they don't like guns. Regardless of that I still find Second Life satisfying and enjoyable, because I have a secret fantasy life there as an architect. Other people, other fantasies; some of them quite odd, yes. I don't think Second Life really appeals to people unless something is just not there in their real lives. Interpersonal relationships, a family, the ability to walk. Whatever. The latency and all that, it's been greatly improved the last year, and the sims are able to support a lot more people in them now, but the greatest mistake they made at Linden Lab was in going with backwards compatability. They've trapped themselves.
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