Comments
Is Your Company Running A Data Dump?
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
anon4483228301
50%
50%
anon4483228301,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/18/2014 | 12:36:33 PM
Re: Data dump by another name
right,

good 

<a  href="http://www.fmed.bu.edu.eg">information</a>
jagibbons
50%
50%
jagibbons,
User Rank: Ninja
2/12/2014 | 8:10:46 AM
Re: E-discovery
There's big money in e-discovery. At least for the lawyers and vendor making e-discovery tools. The enterprise being targeted is the loser because of time, effort and cost to dig through all of that stuff.

I suspect that many companies are keeping too much data because they don't have a strategy well enough defined to outline a use or purpose for that data. Then, since storage is relatively cheap, they keep everything.

The flip side of that coin are the companies run by executives who've been bitten before by lawsuits and keep everything for CYA purposes.

Either way, it's to the company's detriment to keep absolutely everything. Decide what you need and keep that. Much better and more effective than keeping everything and eventually (or not) deciding what you need.
Lorna Garey
50%
50%
Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
2/11/2014 | 1:45:54 PM
E-discovery
We hear all the time about companies spending millions on e-discovery requests and lawyers coming up with a 'smoking gun' from some obscure data source that no one thought to delete. To wit: Chris Christie as Jersey digs for Bridgegate evidence.

Do you think the 'keep everything forever' mindset is going to play into this, making money for e-discovery software firms and consultancies and teams of lawyers?
Michael Fitzgerald
50%
50%
Michael Fitzgerald,
User Rank: Moderator
2/11/2014 | 1:17:59 PM
Re: Data dump by another name
I had the same thought about creating a smell for bad data.  We all know data decays over time. It would be fun, and telling, to have data records take on a different hue as they aged, perhaps.  You could then apply a little data air freshener. Or put it in a data coffin...
RobPreston
100%
0%
RobPreston,
User Rank: Author
2/11/2014 | 10:45:59 AM
Re: Data dump by another name
"Data lake" doesn't do the practice justice. Lakefront property fetches a premium. No one's looking to drain lakes (for the most part) or reduce their size. For those subjected to driving through Staten Island, think Arthur Kill. Local residents couldn't close up that dump fast enough. Perhaps if rotting data smelled (a perverse market opportunity here?), companies wouldn't hoard so much of it.  
Laurianne
50%
50%
Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
2/11/2014 | 10:27:54 AM
Data dump by another name
EMC likes to use the term "data lake" to describe the vast amount of data customers are grappling with. That sounds more pleasant -- but at some companies, data dump must certainly be more accurate.


IT's Reputation: What the Data Says
IT's Reputation: What the Data Says
InformationWeek's IT Perception Survey seeks to quantify how IT thinks it's doing versus how the business really views IT's performance in delivering services - and, more important, powering innovation. Our results suggest IT leaders should worry less about whether they're getting enough resources and more about the relationships they have with business unit peers.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Government Oct. 20, 2014
Energy and weather agencies are busting long-held barriers to analyzing big data. Can the feds now get other government agencies into the movement?
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Archived InformationWeek Radio
A roundup of the top stories and trends on InformationWeek.com
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.