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Microsoft Windows 8.1 Update Takes Shape
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Gary_EL
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Gary_EL,
User Rank: Ninja
2/11/2014 | 10:01:11 PM
Moving on from XP
I've moved on from XP, alright. This comment is written on my new backup laptop, which runs Ubuntu.

 
TerryB
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
2/12/2014 | 1:07:57 PM
Re: Moving on from XP
All about the apps, Gary. If all you do is use browser, smart move. But good luck joining that Ubuntu to an Active Directory domain or a RADIUS WiFi access point.

Leaving that stuff out of mix, did you hear Google Chrome passed the latest hacker contest without anyone earning a reward for finding a flaw?  Linux has some new competition in the non Windows arena.
proberts551
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proberts551,
User Rank: Strategist
2/12/2014 | 3:04:12 PM
Re: Moving on from XP
Microsoft has dominated the desktop for decades, but now faces new technological changes that may be the writing on the wall for its doom if it does not change.  The decline of Microsoft has begun with its arrogance in forcing the consumer away from the desktop. It will take time because of the power and presence of Microsoft.

  In all its glory, it Hurriedly pushed out a new OS that is not friendly to the desktop, and only to a new tablet / Laptop touch market which it serves fairly well.  Sure, the Windows 8 can be customized to start the Desktop, but it is difficult to stay away from the GUI touch screen.  After all, that is the "New" start screen.

 With the Advent of Chrome, android, cloud services, improved Linux available and easy to use ( Also very cost effective) ,  and others are on the horizon.   Microsoft cannot afford to lose the Business desktop base of customers.  It also has upset many home users because of the drastic change. Windows 8 is just not easy to use!   With murmurs of Windows 9 being ahead, we wonder if there will be any back peddling by Microsoft to save it's self, and give users at the desktop what they really want?   Simplicity, Security, performance, and affordability.
proberts551
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proberts551,
User Rank: Strategist
2/12/2014 | 3:16:07 PM
Support 25 years of Microsoft.
Linux can do your Network, and your security.  It can do your Word Processing, Spreadsheets, and many other functions needed by business.  Linux Servers are used throughout the web.  If they were not secure, they would not have a huge presence.  Networking Linux is also Cheaper. Not all those CALS, and per user racking.  Tell me how fun Microsoft is when you install a new Server, and have to sit there with 85 updates before you can get to work. We have Linux at the desktop, and never touch the Susie V11 box.  It never needs a reboot because of a crash, hang or update.  Ouch!  no insult intended.   
Gary_EL
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Gary_EL,
User Rank: Ninja
2/12/2014 | 10:32:34 PM
Re: Moving on from XP
@TerryB

You're right, of course. But when I consider that almost all of what I do involves producing documents that can be read by MS Word, spreadsheets that can be read by Excel, communicating by cloud-based email such as Yahoo, and posting to boards such as this, Ubuntu will work for a backup machine. I still spend most of my time on my Windows 7 machine. I learned last week, on this forum actually, that you can run some apps on a Chromebook, so it's not dead in the water when the internet is temporarily down. And, speaking of Chrombooks and Ubuntu, I also just found out that it is possible to install Ubuntu on Chrombooks, so you'll have a lot of capability even when the internet isn't available
rjones2818
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rjones2818,
User Rank: Strategist
2/12/2014 | 12:18:32 PM
M$ is learning a well known truth....
Businesses tend to hang on to what works for them (mainly because they're trying to save money however they can).  If XP is running well for them, and they know that 8.1 won't run well on the hardware they have, a business will keep using XP until they can't any more (yes, it's a broad brush stroke, but it's true often enough that it's worth pointing out).
moonwatcher
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moonwatcher,
User Rank: Strategist
2/14/2014 | 3:05:09 PM
Windows 8.1 Update this Spring
Ok, so it makes sense for Microsoft to help consumers move away from Windows XP. Security reasons alone would dictate that. All those Windows XP boxes will be ripe for malware takeovers for denial of service attacks and perhaps worse. So how about making Windows 8.1 (with its fixes for desktop users) be had for the $39 that Windows 8 was offered originally. Or even better, give consumers a choice of Windows 7 or Windows 8.1.

Now that the time is fast approaching (April 8th) many people who were hedging their bets on upgrading an older PC would be more likely to bite on an offer than they were 15 months ago.

To hedge my own bets I've already installed Ubuntu on my older lap top and my Dell Dimension E520 that is still going strong. I mean, why throw perfectly usuable hardware in the landfill? Makes no sense. I just wish Apple would write iTunes for Ubuntu...rats! so I guess I'll be moving my music library, which is on an external drive, to my new but not much loved Windows 8.1 box.

 


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