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2 Reasons Videoconferencing Remains A Niche
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Chip the AV geek
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Chip the AV geek,
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11/22/2011 | 4:59:27 PM
re: 2 Reasons Videoconferencing Remains A Niche
Traditional videoconferencing adds an image to a conversation, but does not provide the rapport and ease of conversation that a face-to-face meeting does. No wonder many users conclude it is of little value. Low-latency conferencing, such as Vidyo and Magor, make video meetings far more comfortable, as visual cues accompany lively dialog. Virtual eye-contact, such as provided by Magor videoconference systems or room integrations by DVE, complete the virtual presence experience. That experience provides an ease of conversation, and personable interaction. Add Magor's easy click-to-connect user interface and ad-hoc multipoint conferencing and you will see why Magor users would have responded much differently to the survey. The biggest barrier to videoconferencing adoption is the poor experience from traditional VC systems and webcam chat.
TMENA000
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TMENA000,
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11/7/2011 | 6:23:40 PM
re: 2 Reasons Videoconferencing Remains A Niche
Many progressive companies and business people find Video Conferencing a cost effective - efficient way for them to do business. It combines two of the senses audio and visual for better retention and comprehension. Yes, there are sometime glitches using it but the benefits far outweigh the challenges. As time goes on there will be an increase in use as systems are improving.
ThePrisoner6
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ThePrisoner6,
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11/4/2011 | 4:45:26 PM
re: 2 Reasons Videoconferencing Remains A Niche
Deb,

Quite true, in fact our video usage has ramped up considerably in the last 5-10 years, however it remains a "nice to have" and not a "must-have".
Deb Donston-Miller
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Deb Donston-Miller,
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11/1/2011 | 1:02:58 PM
re: 2 Reasons Videoconferencing Remains A Niche
I agree that logistics are a huge piece of it. In my experience, the majority of meetings at a company are ad hoc, and I can't think of too many weekly update-type meetings that would be made more efficient or productive with video. It tends to get distracting. That's not to say that there isn't an important place for video in most companies.

Deb Donston-Miller
Contributing Editor, The BrainYard
therapy
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therapy,
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10/31/2011 | 10:10:04 PM
re: 2 Reasons Videoconferencing Remains A Niche
Cost is also always an issue. Sure, a web cam is cheap, but shoveling the excessive growth in bandwidth usage across networks does not come for free.
jrapoza
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jrapoza,
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10/31/2011 | 7:18:20 PM
re: 2 Reasons Videoconferencing Remains A Niche
It's funny, I've heard from lots of people who talk about faking bad video on those weekly conferencing calls just so they don't have to be seen.
I think one reason that so many companies give up on video is that they focus on conferencing first, and that is often the least valuable form of video. The video that can really pay off for businesses is more in offline, for things like training, demos and sales.

Jim Rapoza is an InformationWeek Contributing Editor
ThePrisoner6
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ThePrisoner6,
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10/31/2011 | 6:13:13 PM
re: 2 Reasons Videoconferencing Remains A Niche
I have worked with video conferencing internally, most often for remote office training purposes, but it is a "walled garden" as described in the article. The conference appliances exist only in certain meeting rooms which must be scheduled for that purpose, and they are only for internal communications with other branch offices. They were a large up-front investment, required training to use, and have been problematic from day 1. Some user feedback we have received has been that a phone conference is preferred. Reasons given include that it is easier to set up and can be done from someone's desk if necessary. As long as the same screen can be viewed by all participants, a visual of the speaker(s) is unnecessary for most meetings.


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