Comments
VMware, Google Team On Chromebooks
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
Thomas Claburn
50%
50%
Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
2/13/2014 | 8:27:23 PM
Re: VMware Google move
It seems to me that virtualization is the beginning of the end. Once people aren't directly involved with Windows, seeing it only through a virtualized instance, the less affinity they're going to have for it. Microsoft can't afford to be disintermediated that way.
Charlie Babcock
50%
50%
Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Author
2/13/2014 | 7:22:40 PM
DaaS Vs. VDI
The difference between virtual desktop infrastructure and desktop as a service is basically the difference between an  enterprise service and a cloud service. You could also say the only difference is scale, but in fact the two will need different mangement and control software. Both operate on similar principles of provisioning end user desktops on central servers and sending the display down the wire (or through the air) to the end user device. VDI is aimed at one enterprise; DaaS is meant to supply many enterprises. VMware is using PCoIP and RDP protocols to move the presentation to the end user. RDP would be what Windows Server uses to serve dumb terminals, just in case some people are starting to think this is rocket science.

 
Michael Endler
50%
50%
Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
2/13/2014 | 5:24:41 PM
Re: New commercial obsolete
Yeah, Laurie, I wonder how much longer the "worthless without the Internet" stigma will stick. I see more and more articles refuting it, but a lot of people still seem to think Chromebooks turn into paperweights without WiFi. With Microsoft putting some marketing muscle behind anti-Chromebook efforts, the stigma might persist. But the very existence of those marketing spots demonstrates that Chromebooks have made a lot of progress-- enough to influence Microsoft's PR attitude, anyhow. 
Michael Endler
50%
50%
Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
2/13/2014 | 5:15:35 PM
Re: New commercial obsolete
When I heard about this news, I thought about that commercial too. It's clear Microsoft is concered about Chromebooks eating into the lower end of the market. Apple owns a big, big chunk of the higher end, so that leaves Microsoft and Windows OEMs with an uncomfortable spot in the middle. Google's strategy for negotiating/leveraging the Windows base is getting pretty interesting.
Marilyn Cohodas
50%
50%
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Author
2/13/2014 | 4:59:25 PM
Fat clients
Based on the number of hard drive crashed I've experienced over the years, I'd be willing to chuck my hard drive for a Chromebook. But how reliable is the  virtualized access to files and apps? 
WKash
50%
50%
WKash,
User Rank: Author
2/13/2014 | 4:43:03 PM
Re: VMware Google move
I suspect the main difference between desktop vitualization and desktop as a service has to do with the ability to provision a desktop.  That's one of the services the Department of Homeland Security has made strides trying to create internally for employees, so that they can essentially open an account, secure a virtual desktop and related apps, and have the monthly billing go to the correct accounting line.
rayheffer
50%
50%
rayheffer,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/13/2014 | 3:00:57 PM
Re: VMware Google move
Yeah licensing is a pain, but essentially you need Microsoft Virtual Desktop Access licenses (VDA) which they include as part of Software Assurance (SA). If you don't have SA then you'll need to buy the VDA license from Microsoft.
TerryB
50%
50%
TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
2/13/2014 | 2:38:32 PM
Re: VMware Google move
Thanks Ray. I'm thinking you may be correct if not for the problem of connecting the Chromebook to RADIUS WiFi. You have to be connected to internal DHCP server to even logon to the domain.

If the Chromebook has USB port, and I'm thinking it did, you could use a USB to Network Adapter to hard wire to internal network. Then I suspect you are exactly right when signing on to virtual Win session.

In our case, we needed WiFi so was a hurdle that stopped us in our tracks. It was also somewhat cumbersome that device wanted to connect to internet at startup with a Google account. On our internal network, you can not connect to internet thru proxy server without being in AD group authorized to internet, a Catch-22 with Chromebook.

These Chromebooks did not have this built in VMWare ability this article is about, maybe it would have changed the game a little bit.

So, where does the Windows license come from? Surely MS isn't let this happen for free? Most old Win desktops are, at least here, OEM Win licenses which can not be transferred to other hardware. Seems like you would have to have a lot things setup a certain way in your Win environment to pull this off.
rayheffer
100%
0%
rayheffer,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/13/2014 | 2:10:36 PM
Re: VMware Google move
Hi Terry,

Whilst the Chromebook itself won't be joined to the domain, the Windows virtual desktops will be. This provides businesses to treat the Chromebook similarly to a BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) if they so desire, whilst the corporate desktop (Windows XP, 7 or 8 virtual machine) will be secure and adhere to company IT security policies. If the Chromebook is lost or damaged, then there is no data to lose. The Acer C7 Chromebook has Ethernet and I'm sure others will.

Using virtual desktops in this way also provides compatibility with web apps that only support a particular version of Internet Explorer. By bringing ThinApp packaged applications (part of VMware Horizon Suite) to the virtual desktop, you'll have IE6 web apps launch in IE and other web services launch in Firefox or Chrome (or IE11!).

Looking forward to getting my hands on a Chromebook!


Ray
Gary_EL
50%
50%
Gary_EL,
User Rank: Ninja
2/13/2014 | 1:44:43 PM
Re: New commercial obsolete
I don't think you can with a just-out-of-the-box Chromebook. The device, by itself, gives you the Chrome browser, which, when you have an internet connection, allows you access anything online. There is an array of apps that you can install on a chrombook that don't need the internet. You can also install Ubuntu (freeware Linux), which will give you a VERY wide array a freeware applications to work with.
Page 1 / 2   >   >>


The Business of Going Digital
The Business of Going Digital
Digital business isn't about changing code; it's about changing what legacy sales, distribution, customer service, and product groups do in the new digital age. It's about bringing big data analytics, mobile, social, marketing automation, cloud computing, and the app economy together to launch new products and services. We're seeing new titles in this digital revolution, new responsibilities, new business models, and major shifts in technology spending.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek - September 2, 2014
Avoiding audits and vendor fines isn't enough. Take control of licensing to exact deeper software discounts and match purchasing to actual employee needs.
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Archived InformationWeek Radio
In in-depth look at InformationWeek's top stories for the preceding week.
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.