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Microsoft Sells 200M Win 8 Licenses: Yawn
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awebb199
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awebb199,
User Rank: Strategist
2/15/2014 | 5:16:51 PM
Re: 100 million since may 2013
Try before you buy

Dell has an article on downgrading to Win7 for the 8500 if you like.  Search "dell How to Downgrade from Windows 8 Pro to Windows 7 Professional"

Or you do some of the fixes in information week make-windows-8-like-windows-7

Or you can just take the most used programs and pin them to the taskbar.

It was silly for Microsoft to break the way users interacted with Win7 just to promote the tiles interface especially on a machine which does not have touch anyhow.

HP was trying to ship systems with Win7 again, but I have not heard that it was a huge success.

Personally, I had bought a laptop withe Win7 and a free upgrade to Win 8.  I dual booted for a while before switching to Win 8 mostly because the boot up times are faster, and I wanted to be able to run both the old and new programs.
PaulS681
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PaulS681,
User Rank: Ninja
2/15/2014 | 5:11:17 PM
Numbers
Great article Michael... Numbers can be made to look any way you want them to look. I think this is a good case that illustrates that. MS is hurting from Win 8 sales I think. I also think they will come back. Why they continue to repeat history is a mystery to me.
moonwatcher
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moonwatcher,
User Rank: Strategist
2/15/2014 | 2:57:51 PM
Re: 100 million since may 2013
awebb, Your comments are well taken, but I wonder how many of those 100 million licenses were FORCED upon consumers instead of actually sought out by them? For instance, a year ago when I wanted to buy a new PC, a Dell XPS 8500, Dell would not sell it with Windows 7, so I was stuck with getting Windows 8 Pro, even though I wasn't very happy about that. But I needed a PC for working from home, so I HAD to buy one. Given the choice, I would have chosen Windows 7 Pro in a heartbeat. Months later, it made me mad to see Dell (and now HP and others) touting that you can still get Windows 7.

If I could downgrade for free I would. Many of us long term desktop users would consider it an upgrade.

 
moonwatcher
IW Pick
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moonwatcher,
User Rank: Strategist
2/15/2014 | 2:48:18 PM
re: MS Sells 200M Win 8 Licenses: Yawn
The article states, "Win 8 also shackled the desktop with knuckleheaded UI changes such as the missing Start menu, which only exacerbated the issue."

That pretty much sums it up for most desktop users. And I know many people with tablets but I know of NO ONE who has purchased a Win 8 tablet. Seems people are happy with Android or Apple in that regard, and aren't that interested in what MS Win 8.1 would offer. The problem is that Win 8.1's main feature, that of running native Windows programs such as MS Office, is not the "killer app" that MS hoped. People still use tablets as media consumption devices, not creation devices. People still go to lap tops or desktops to create "important" documents. And of course, people like me doing engineering work need the power and interface that only desktops provide. Windows 8.1 brings little to the table in that regard that isn't better served by Windows 7.

Perhaps Microsoft should put Windows 8.1 on sale again for $39 until April 8th for those upgrading from XP (assuming that older 2006 vintage motherboards would even run Windows 8.1, which might be a crapshoot).

At this point I think most enterprise customers think of Windows 8 as either a failure or as a "consumer" oriented OS, and will stick with Windows 7 for a VERY long time, and hope that Windows 9 or 10 will be more oriented for getting work done, or at least have an easy way to turn off the Metro apps and lock them out.

 

 
awebb199
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awebb199,
User Rank: Strategist
2/15/2014 | 11:47:24 AM
100 million since may 2013
Windows 8.x has DOUBLED its share of desktop OS in use from around 5% 6 months ago to 10.58% now

#3 neglects to account for the 100 million well after the promotional period.   You can't denigrate the 100 million by claiming that they were discounted when the discount period had expired already.

it is neither a great success, nor a disaster; just a transitional product that needs more polishing.

The big question is will enterprise stop buying laptops and cell phones for employees and consolidate with a touch tablet that runs their existing software?  That decision is yet to be made.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Laurianne McLaughlin
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Laurianne McLaughlin,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/15/2014 | 8:46:56 AM
Important context
Thanks for breaking down the context here, Michael. #2 is one that a lot of people don't mention when they throw around Windows numbers. Based on what we see on our site, many IT pros want to read about Windows 8 tablets, but few are buying yet. Any of you seeing many Win8 tablets in the wild in your enterprises?
Charlie Babcock
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Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Author
2/14/2014 | 3:18:46 PM
Windows 8, a decked out legacy system
Good assessment, Michael. I've heard many explanations of why Windows 8 isn't selling beyond its captive OEM audience but the fact that it's a legacy end user system, decked out as a hipster, is the simplest. 
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