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Microsoft Sells 200M Win 8 Licenses: Yawn
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SachinEE
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SachinEE,
User Rank: Ninja
2/20/2014 | 6:00:55 AM
Re: Microsoft Sells 200M Win 8 Licenses: Yawn
@ Brian.Dean, It is really amazing how many times we have to read about difficulty to use new UI of Windows 8 from people fairly well conversant with technology. I have used Windows 8 on a non-touch display and found it not-so-difficult to use, though one can enjoy full features of Windows 8 on touch displays.
SachinEE
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SachinEE,
User Rank: Ninja
2/20/2014 | 6:00:35 AM
Re: Microsoft Sells 200M Win 8 Licenses: Yawn
@ Joe Stanganelli, well that's a fairly balanced analysis I must say. Microsoft is playing its cards very carefully it seems. They are trying to penetrate the mobile market (Tablets and Smart Phones) slowly but surely deploying different techniques like lowering the prices of their tablets etc. Although we can't be sure, yet we can see some gains for Microsoft if they could persistently try to boost their tablets and smart phones and come up with smooth integration of all their devices with one platform.

 
SachinEE
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SachinEE,
User Rank: Ninja
2/20/2014 | 5:14:08 AM
Re: Microsoft Sells 200M Win 8 Licenses: Yawn
Windows 8 and Windows 8.1 sales may have fallen short of Windows 7 sales but 200 million is still a healthy figure to talk about standalone.  Your analysis is a valid one, but we have to take into account the post-Bill Gates problems faced by Microsoft. Overall slump in PC market and Microsoft's recent debut in tablets world are also things to be considered.

 
David LC
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David LC,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/19/2014 | 8:30:00 PM
Great news!
Funny how everyone always discounts Microsoft as a company.  Come on....can I actually get any work done on my iPad?  I have had an iPad for several years and mostly use it to check email, linkedin/facebook, read articles and read magazines.  I must have around 40 apps but they just don't compare to the productivity of using my laptop with 3 large monitors attached.  The high end HP Elite laptops have display ports.  I'm also switching over to a Windows 8 Pro tablet to replace my iPad.  The HP laptop Split X2 to be exact.  i5 Intel and 12 hours of battery life AND can run all my Windows software.  I use as an Ultrabook or detach and use it as a tablet.  I love it.

I recently updated my main machine to Windows 8.1 a few months ago.  I was worried because of all the negative press but Window 8.1 is actually great.  The tiles are much better than the start button.  I can now configure exactly how my tiles (shortcuts) are organized.  With the start button, you are stuck looking at every single thing you ever installed, even thou you may only use 5% of those shortcuts during a normal week.  I would also love to get a nice 24 or 27inch TOUCH  screen to go with windows 8.1.  The experience is just great.  I would still use a mouse for regular activity but what a nice convenience to just use touch at times.  I'm looking forward to it.
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
2/19/2014 | 12:52:06 PM
Re: 100 million since may 2013
I think on one level it shows that customers do not trust third party tools that are not well know and would open up their system to a possible security threat -- Win 7 has had that problem at times through third party widgets, in the enterprise security becomes a bigger concern. If win 8 was received in a better fashion at the consumer end then most probably it would have also found its way into the enterprise, making for better sales figures.
rradina
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rradina,
User Rank: Ninja
2/19/2014 | 8:49:40 AM
Re: Unbelievable
That's the challenge in today's "digital magazine" era.  As consumers of this media, we have to make sure we understand what we're consuming.  Is it reporting or editorial.  I think there's also a new class of media which is blogging.  Blogging can be reporting, editorial or what I call ranting/venting.  The latter category is quite broad and it's generally easy to spot because it begins with a sensational title designed to call attention to itself.

Since print died, I believe this is a natural outcome of our expectations of magazines to be more like a daily newspaper.  We want new daily content.  We want to know about new product announcements TODAY, not a month from now as is typical when trying to schedule a weekly paper publication (or far longer if it was a monthly publication.)  That puts tremendous pressure on sites to create new daily content.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
2/19/2014 | 2:11:47 AM
Re: "Failure" seems a bit much
FWiW, and maybe this is just me, but I think the rush among UI designers to make everything "tablet-friendly" (whatever that means) is based upon an imagined, false demand.  We're not at a point where everyday users want big things to slide around.  We're happy with little and medium things to point and click.  Obviously, tablets present some interfacing issues when it comes to this, but there must surely be a happy medium.  I don't think MSFT has found that with Windows 8.
bttlk
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bttlk,
User Rank: Strategist
2/19/2014 | 12:45:17 AM
Re: Only a few Tablets so far
I have experienced the logon problem you describe with tablets (Samsung and HP) from time to time, and also an HP Windows 7 Slate when using the touch screen, but not with a USB or bluetooth keyboard.  Doesn't happen on every logon, but when it fails it takes several tries to logon; most of the time I find a keyboard to get logged on and to start working!
bttlk
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bttlk,
User Rank: Strategist
2/19/2014 | 12:30:47 AM
Re: Unbelievable
Articles with titles such as "hate Windows 8" or "failure" are poor journalism.  You may not like the new product, or worse yet not understand it and criticize it wrongly, but hate or fail do not belong in a reputable article.  I am offended by InformationWeek and ZDNet's approach in many articles, which I classify as "opinion" not reporting.  I often pass on reading them due to the titles, or the same titles running for weeks.  After a few days, it's old info, not news.  Take it down.  More objective articles should be written, not some bash Apple or MS or any other company or platform.  These two companies are doing nicely with their billions of profits. Not every product is a hit.
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
2/18/2014 | 10:26:22 PM
Re: Unbelievable
Thanks for the follow-up, petey.

"Not that their products are or were ever perfect, I think it's important to realize just how much of today's technology depends on their products."


Very valid point. Commentators sometimes act like Microsoft is dying, and I know I've sometimes described its problems too aggressively (such as my use of the word "failure" at the end of this story!). But as you suggested, the company is damn-near indispensable to the way the world works today. A lot of people don't realize how much of our business and societal infrastructure relies on Microsoft technologies. Windows 8 is problematic, but legacy Windows software is incredibly important, as are a number of other Microsoft products.

Windows is important to the company's overall strategy, but Microsoft is actually pretty diversified. We can debate how much power and influence Microsoft is positioning itself for, and what that might mean for customers and partners. But it will remain powerful and influential in almost all scenarios I can foresee.

You seem to feel strongly that Microsoft should be given its due respect as a phenomenally important company-- and I agree. Windows 8 is a legitimate sore spot that could open some of the company's strategies to disruption, but most companies would kill to have Microsoft's "problems."
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