Comments
Windows 8 Devices Get Cheap
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JohnD985
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JohnD985,
User Rank: Strategist
2/22/2014 | 12:03:01 PM
CRAP IS CRAP, EVEN IF IT'S FREE
I'm sorry, but Microsoft has lost it.

 

RIP
anon1906250919
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anon1906250919,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/22/2014 | 12:23:38 PM
Re: CRAP IS CRAP, EVEN IF IT'S FREE
I have to agree with John, MS has lost it big time.  They keep pushing crazy, like Bing, Window 8, and their terrible Windows Phone.  Pushing billions at these loser products isn't going to make people buy them.  I used to be excited about the latest MS Office and their newest OS.  Now I want nothing to do with them as the UI gets worse each release.

And as far as the article about "MS need to be commited to their new UI", I think the author meant they needed to be "commited for coming up with such a lame UI".  They didn't design it for desktops, yet they are pushing it for desktop usage - CRAZY!


I really hope MS can turn it around with Windows 9, and come up with a desktop OS that is usable.  No more hidden "secret" menus, no crazy tablet or phone features for my desktop.  No touch screen requirements for my desktop - I'll never be raising my arm hundreds of times a day to smear my monitor.  I'm a developer, using MS products to develop software.  I'll never be using a tablet to do that.
PaulS681
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PaulS681,
User Rank: Ninja
2/23/2014 | 5:53:06 PM
Re: CRAP IS CRAP, EVEN IF IT'S FREE
@Anon... Have you looked at 8.1 yet?  I have it on my laptop which basically is my desktop. I have it configured so it looks and acts just like windows 7. You can avoid all that metro UI "junk" if you don't like it. I would agree with you that windows 8 wasn't meant for a desktop but they have corrected some things in windows 8.1.
shakeeb
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shakeeb,
User Rank: Black Belt
2/28/2014 | 7:04:57 PM
Re: CRAP IS CRAP, EVEN IF IT'S FREE
@anon- When it comes to windows phone I have to agree that Microsoft is a failure. The navigation itself is driving me nuts. (The same way it did when Windows 8 desktop version was launched)
AsokS489
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AsokS489,
User Rank: Strategist
3/2/2014 | 12:24:34 AM
Re: CRAP IS CRAP, EVEN IF IT'S FREE
Microsoft Flunky to New CEO: Sir, people don't think our Windows poop-on-stick sandwich 8.1 is very tasty.


New CEO: No problem. Lower the price 70% on Windows poop-on-a-stick sandwich 8.1. It'll still taste horrible but at least it will be cheap.

Microsoft Flunky to New CEO: But sir, why not make it tastier instead?

New CEO: Are you kidding me? Then we would have to admit we were wrong about the taste. Boy, do you have a lot to learn! That's why you're a flunky and I'm a CEO!

 
mrazpv
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mrazpv,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/22/2014 | 12:25:39 PM
Re: CRAP IS CRAP, EVEN IF IT'S FREE
Just come out and say it, your a no-brain Apple loving zombie.    So obvious you have not tried the windows 7 or 8 platform.  My wife has an ipad I have a windows tablet.  No comparison, if you want to do "real" work ie, word, powerpoint, or excel the windows tablet is far superior.  If you want to update your facebook or play candy crush or some other mindless game, the ipad is great for that. I know so many people that regret there ipad purchase, its an overpriced toy.
Stratustician
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Stratustician,
User Rank: Ninja
2/22/2014 | 2:09:29 PM
Re: CRAP IS CRAP, EVEN IF IT'S FREE
I'll back you up here.  I have devices on just about every platform, and which ones do I use the most?  My windows 8 devices.  iPads are great consumption devices in that they play games beautifully, are intuitive and have great apps.  But that's really it.  I love the fact that my Windows 8 device runs both apps (granted they do need to beef up their app catalogue) but it also allows me to do actual productive things on the device and use it like a proper laptop.  This means when my laptop dies a horrible death, I'll be less likely to replace it since I have a full-fledged laptop/tablet hybrid that can do anything a laptop needs to do.  
bttlk
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bttlk,
User Rank: Strategist
2/24/2014 | 5:36:23 PM
Re: CRAP IS CRAP, EVEN IF IT'S FREE
My plan also.  I am using a Windows 8 phone (Nokia Lumia 928) now, and love it. The integration with the phone, desktop, laptop, and soon an 8-9"Windows tablet is so efficient.  Saying goodby to Android phone and tablet. Recently retired XP and Vista PC's, both of which were still running perfectly, but lacked 8.1 features I use. 
danielcawrey
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danielcawrey,
User Rank: Ninja
2/22/2014 | 6:57:12 PM
Re: CRAP IS CRAP, EVEN IF IT'S FREE
I don't think that Microsoft has lost it, but they do need to continue to think differently about their licensing model. Think about it: although Chromebooks are becoming popular, even this article discussed that VMWare deal where Chromebooks can have Windows VMs running. 

People are going to continue to use Windows, it just depends how Microsoft is able to monetize it going forward. 
PaulS681
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PaulS681,
User Rank: Ninja
2/23/2014 | 5:40:25 PM
Re: CRAP IS CRAP, EVEN IF IT'S FREE

I would hardly call MS windows 8 crap. You can dislike some or all of the features but it's far from crap. What might give your post a little credibility is if you can explain why you think its crap. A comment that simply says Crap is crap with no backing is crap itself I'm afraid. I just upgraded my laptop to 8.1 and I'm surprised at how much I like it. I have made it look like windows 7 but its still windows 8.

Gary_EL
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Gary_EL,
User Rank: Ninja
2/24/2014 | 12:45:21 AM
Re: CRAP IS CRAP, EVEN IF IT'S FREE
The whole Windows 8(.1) experience might be summed up as: "Microsoft gave a party, but nobody came." It's a product with no market and a solution where there was no problem. I admire them for trying, for sticking with it as long as it long as they did, and essentially giving up before it was too late. The problem is that there was nothing wrong with XP to begin with.
bttlk
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bttlk,
User Rank: Strategist
2/24/2014 | 5:26:43 PM
Re: CRAP IS CRAP, EVEN IF IT'S FREE
Wow, show your ignorance with a post like yours Gary_EL.  XP is obsolete, dead, not supportable due to security concerns.  Wake up and get off of XP now if you are connected to the Internet.  Sorry that you didn't make the party, but many of us did and love 8.1 on the desktop or laptop, with a KB and mouse.  You do not need touch, and can ignore tthe tiles if you want and just boot to desktop.  Microsoft has not given up, quite the opposite.
bttlk
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bttlk,
User Rank: Strategist
2/24/2014 | 5:41:29 PM
Re: CRAP IS CRAP, EVEN IF IT'S FREE
JohnD895, you are the one who has lost it.  Quit your bitchin.  8.1 is a great OS, easy to learn, and you don't need touch on a desktop or laptop. 
shakeeb
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shakeeb,
User Rank: Black Belt
2/28/2014 | 7:02:16 PM
Re: CRAP IS CRAP, EVEN IF IT'S FREE
@Johnd985 – Don't you think reducing the prices will make Microsoft devices more attractive to the customers? 
PaulS681
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PaulS681,
User Rank: Ninja
2/23/2014 | 5:47:46 PM
Vmware deal

If MS spins it right that can make money off vmware's deal with the chromebook. Running windows as a virtual machine on a chromebook will still require a windows license. I do like they are lowing the cost for OEM licenses on devices less than $250.

bttlk
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bttlk,
User Rank: Strategist
2/24/2014 | 5:39:28 PM
Grow up and stop complaining about Windows 8.1
You don't need Windows 9, Windows 8.1 is fine as is, with more changes coming soon to pacify you whiners.
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
2/24/2014 | 7:38:25 PM
Crap or not crap?
I think the fact that most comments here are of the "crap" or "not crap" variety demonstrates how polarizing Windows 8 is.

The divisiveness surprises me a little, to be honest. Sure, it made sense at first, but I expected it to diminish after Windows 8.1-- not because 8.1 is amazing or anything, but because it made the OS functional enough for two distinct groups of users. As anyone who's read my editorials about 2-in-1 devices knows, I think Microsoft's convergence play will cater to niches for the immediate future-- so I'm not surprised that Windows tablet sales are still a bit soft. But I am surprised that desktop users have been so unimpressed by Windows 8.1.

When Windows 8 initially launched, I thought it offered an okay tablet UI that, thanks to Microsoft's strong arm tactics, significantly detracted from the desktop. When Windows 8.1 arrived, I thought it would silence some of this discontent. No, there's still not a Start Menu, but in less than five minutes, you can enable boot-to-desktop, disable hot corners, and otherwise banish most signs of the Modern UI and its touch controls. In essence, you can turn Windows 8.1 into a faster, more stable version of Windows 7 (minus the Start Menu). Even so, less than 40% of combined Windows 8/8.1 users are running the update (according to Net Applications), which doesn't suggest desktop users are rushing to upgrade.

As for the upcoming update to Win 8.1-- sounds pretty reasonable to me. It makes the OS friendlier to people with non-touch devices but doesn't retreat from the Modern UI on touch hardware-- not a bad way to go, considering the position in which Microsoft found itself heading into the update's development.

But Windows 8.1 hasn't caused much of a stir-- so will this update achieve more? In some ways, 2015's rumored Windows 9 sounds a lot like what Windows 8 should have been originally. But will this spring's update be enough to sustain things in the meantime? With Windows XP losing support just as this Windows 8.1 update (and allegedly cheaper devices) are set to debut, maybe Microsoft's new OS can finally make more than an incremental market share gain.
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
2/24/2014 | 7:43:59 PM
How does a $250 Windows 8 laptop sound? Or a $200 2-in-1?
Chromebooks don't generally offer the nicest hardware experience, but they've become popular because they balance functionality and cost. Microsoft didn't confirm this licensing deal at Mobile World Congress, but it forecast its intention to pursue cheaper price points. Would a $200 or $250 non-touch Windows 8.1 laptop that boots to the desktop be equally attractive? As Microsoft likes to point out, Windows can do more than Chrome. If Windows beat Chrome on functionality, matches Chrome on price, and is close on user-friendliness, shouldn't the scales tip more fully in Microsoft's favor?

And what about the cheap tablets that Microsoft promised at MWC? In my experience, low-cost tablets become pretty unsatisfying if OEMs skimp too much on components.

 
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
2/24/2014 | 8:08:09 PM
Re: How does a $250 Windows 8 laptop sound? Or a $200 2-in-1?
I would be very interested in that kind of laptop for my middle school students. But part of the story here also is Office. My kids prefer Office apps, but they don't have it on their laptop because of the cost, and they also use Google Apps because they're so easy to share. They don't love Google Apps, but they're getting very used to them.  
rradina
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rradina,
User Rank: Ninja
2/24/2014 | 9:07:28 PM
Re: How does a $250 Windows 8 laptop sound? Or a $200 2-in-1?
Try an Office 365 Home Subscription.  $10month and you can install it on up to 5 desktop devices and 5 mobile devices.

I have three boys and they all have the latest Office.
JohnD985
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JohnD985,
User Rank: Strategist
2/25/2014 | 5:12:05 AM
Re: How does a $250 Windows 8 laptop sound? Or a $200 2-in-1?
Subscription is not the way to go.

I'd much rather pay for the software I use.

There are many free or cheap alternatives to Office these days, that Office has become irrelevant.
rradina
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rradina,
User Rank: Ninja
2/25/2014 | 7:37:28 AM
Re: How does a $250 Windows 8 laptop sound? Or a $200 2-in-1?
The OP said his kids prefer Office.  As such, your comment is irrelevant.  Besides, a subscription is paying for the software you use.  Perhaps what you meant to say is that you prefer to pay once for a perpetual license.

 
GBARRINGTON196
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GBARRINGTON196,
User Rank: Strategist
2/25/2014 | 8:42:45 AM
Re: How does a $250 Windows 8 laptop sound? Or a $200 2-in-1?
As far as the Win 8 controversy goes, I think of it as a product being sold out of its time.  The Metro interface would have been a HUGE hit in 1994.  But now, it's a "me too" touch UI, and as a desktop UI, it addresses needs people simply don't have.  It is aimed at people a bit afraid of the computer, who have no experience with them and who have no pre-concieved ideas of how computers should work, and how they should work with computers.  There just aren't many people like that left.   Win 8 adresses issues that stopped being issues 15 years ago.

To a different poster, MS Office isn't irrelevant, but what it provides has become a commodity that can't really be sold at a premium.  It's like trying to get people to believe that a chicken sold by Tyson is significantly better than one sold by Perdue.  Chickens are still relevant, but a chicken is still a chicken.
rradina
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rradina,
User Rank: Ninja
2/25/2014 | 2:04:00 PM
Re: How does a $250 Windows 8 laptop sound? Or a $200 2-in-1?
Metro a huge hit in 1994?  I'd like to see that.  It would run on a 640x480 256 passive LCD screen that sports a microwave-oven-quality touch screen, 5lb NiCad battery, coax Ethernet port whose signal terminator doubles as a handle and a 486 SX2/66 that might, might offer 8MB of RAM with the right EMS TSR to load drivers into high memory.  That would be something!
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
2/25/2014 | 1:18:01 PM
Re: How does a $250 Windows 8 laptop sound? Or a $200 2-in-1?
I don't think Office is irrelevant by any means, though it doesn't appear invincible in all markets any more. For enterprises, I think Office 365 presents a lot of legitimate benefits. For consumers, the advantages are less obvious-- especially because, as you point out, a lot of free/cheap alternatives are "good enough" unless you're a power user. But even for consumers, the multi-device licenses can be useful, and as Office apps become increasingly integrated with one another, the suite's collaboration and social tools could become a bigger deal, in the office and at home. In any case, even if there are good alternatives to Office, I think a market clearly exists for sub-$250 Windows PCs. Give students a non-touch, $200 laptop that runs Office, for example, and I think you'll see a lot of happy school administrators. The 8-inch Windows tablets that come close to that price point aren't all that useful for Office-- but a 13-15 inch, no frills laptop offers clear utility at that price.
GBARRINGTON196
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GBARRINGTON196,
User Rank: Strategist
2/25/2014 | 3:02:31 PM
Re: How does a $250 Windows 8 laptop sound? Or a $200 2-in-1?
A market for a sub $250 tablet that runs Windows? Sure I can believe that, but a version of of MS Office to run on it that costs (either through susscription or outright purchase of license) that costs in the neighborhood of $120 a year? For Students? Sounds like a dumb purchase to me.
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
2/25/2014 | 3:13:53 PM
Re: How does a $250 Windows 8 laptop sound? Or a $200 2-in-1?
Maybe, but Microsoft runs interesting promotions-- e.g. buy Office 365 for your teachers and all of your students get it for free. That stuff had already sweetened the deal enough to persuade some, and cheap devices can only help.

My bigger concern is that the new devices end up too cheap. The first low-cost Windows mini-tablets (i.e. that used the previous generation Atom chips) were almost unusable because of poor hardware-- I'm talking about at you, Acer Iconia. The newer, post-8.1 batches have been much better, thankfully. Anyhow, the same point could apply for these forthcoming, low-cost Windows laptops and 2-in-1s. Budget devices can filter users toward more lucrative services and higher-end machines-- but if the device components are too cheap and the experience suffers, it won't help.

Plus, as I've noted elsewhere, Windows 8.1 hasn't appeased mouse-and-keyboard concern as much as I'd expected. The upcoming update takes things a step further than 8.1-- but if it also produces less-than-anticipated adoption, what then? The idea that a $250, non-touch Windows PC will satisfy is predicated on the UI being agreeable to the average user.

Suffice to say, I see the market, but I also see the ongoing concern.
rradina
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rradina,
User Rank: Ninja
2/24/2014 | 9:20:06 PM
Re: How does a $250 Windows 8 laptop sound? Or a $200 2-in-1?
Don't forget malware.  Sadly, it's still a huge problem for the Windows space.  Even with all of the code signing and confirmation prompts, one wrong download and you'll have a spyware/adware problem requiring the the device to be wiped and reloaded.

Even with nearly 30 years of IT experience under my belt, it's often difficult for me to determine which "download" button I should click to get the software I want.  Most links lead to "download managers" or browser "toolbars" that are infested with malware, that don't uninstall themselves and even when you find something that will remove them, are you ever really sure?
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
2/27/2014 | 2:58:54 PM
What is the right price?
I am helping a family member shop for a new tablet right now. (I brought up Chromebooks as an option, for the price advantage. But not everyone wants to learn a new interface.) What do people think the right pricepoint is for a Windows 8 tablet?


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