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Mobile World Congress: Are Wearables More Fragile Than Fun?
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WKash
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WKash,
User Rank: Author
3/3/2014 | 10:31:50 PM
Re: Moore's Law + 3D printing = cheap wearables
That reminds me of HP's wonderful 200LX PalmTop, which will date me as well, but was a brilliant device that packed all kinds of portable computing power into the palm of your hands long before the smartphone era. It was sad HP eventually abandoned it.

 
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Author
3/3/2014 | 9:45:55 AM
Re: Moore's Law + 3D printing = cheap wearables
What come to mind (and this totally dates me!) is how expensive pocket calculators were when they were first introduced. One of the early models -- The HP-35, launched by HP in 1972 -- retailed for $395 and that was in 1972 dollars! 



 

 
WKash
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WKash,
User Rank: Author
2/28/2014 | 7:03:01 PM
Re: Moore's Law + 3D printing = cheap wearables
Marilyn, I have to agree, wearable devices are bound to get lost (or damaged) pretty easily, so the price points will need to be to the point where it won't be painful to replace them.
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Author
2/27/2014 | 8:15:32 AM
Re: Moore's Law + 3D printing = cheap wearables
You want stylish, Kristen? Check out this 3D printed bracelet courtesay of shapeways, a 3D 3Printing marketplace and community. Now if it could also tell time and deliver emails!

 

 
Kristin Burnham
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Kristin Burnham,
User Rank: Author
2/26/2014 | 9:02:23 PM
Re: Moore's Law + 3D printing = cheap wearables
If I'm going to invest in a wearable device like a smartwatch, I want it to look stylish. I'm not sure 3D printing is there yet. But I can see how 3D printing could be better suited for something like a fitness device.
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
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2/26/2014 | 8:33:02 AM
Re: Moore's Law + 3D printing = cheap wearables
Maybe not supercheap, Wyatt, but if I'm wearing something there will be a good chance that I'll lose it or forget it, so it will need to be something that is not too much of a hardship to replace. (I can't imagine buying $10 a month insurance for every smart gadget that I buy). Your point about securing the data on the wearable is a good one, too. Probably a kill switch or something. Then again, that will add to the cost. But maybe not too much....
PeteJW
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PeteJW,
User Rank: Strategist
2/25/2014 | 11:26:44 PM
Re: Wearable rewards
I agree - there's certainly going to be more featues added and they'll become more useful beyond the fitness community. In the health industries it'll also be interesting to see the blurring of lines between a mobile device and a piece of healthcare equipment -- eg. iPhone doubling as a ECG monitor (already happening) -- obviously issues around data privacy and compliance need to be considered now!
WKash
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WKash,
User Rank: Author
2/25/2014 | 10:32:01 PM
Re: Moore's Law + 3D printing = cheap wearables
Interesting question, Marilyn.  My guess they won't need to be super cheap but cheap enough not care too much what happens to them. The problem remains though, what happens to the data that's captured on or through them? 
WKash
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WKash,
User Rank: Author
2/25/2014 | 10:28:03 PM
Re: Wearable rewards
Shane, I agree, carrying my iphone around the gym to keep  track of my workout progress has it's drawbacks. So I'll be looking forward to that feature rich wrist band that has near-field communications and knows the difference between the leg press and the bicep curl  fitness machines and what weights I'm using and how many reps I've done.

 
PeteJW
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PeteJW,
User Rank: Strategist
2/25/2014 | 6:40:51 PM
Re: Wearable rewards
Excellent point WKash - as with any of these devices I belive success depends on the ability to connect (via apps) to other elements that constitute to a fitness regime. Although not a wearble, Withings with their smart scales have achieved great success using this strategy -- not just because the device is cool, but because it's connected. I'm sure over time we'll see fitness trackers become more connected via apps and API's to many other devices. 
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