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DevOps: The New Outsourcing
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Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
2/25/2014 | 4:43:14 PM
DevOps and IT Titles
Steve, can you share examples of specific IT roles changing -- how are the titles changing when an IT org embraces DevOps?
GregAirWater
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GregAirWater,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/6/2014 | 5:22:08 PM
Re: DevOps and IT Titles
 

You points are very valid and have been in play for years though many firms have failed to realize the benefits of such actions. I have spent over 20 years adjusting automated tasks to reduce down time and improve overall efficiency of the entire development cycle - requirements, design, coding, QA, deployment, production, maintenance and bug fixes.

Many organizations have low hanging fruit where tasks can be used to:

1.     Reduce delays in getting senior management involved in determining when clients could or should be notified. 

2.     Prevent production failures or automatically scheduling review of non critical processes.

3.     Streamline support through publication of recovery steps in alerts.

4.     Provide Independent analysis and pre QA review of vendor updates.

5.     Create Pattern recognition of development schedule conflicts and coding failures.

6.     Do Maintenance / Oil change work that routinely targets poor code.

7.     Perform Analysis of systems business rules with the ability to see complex failure points.

I don't think that it is so much a "convert or be redundant" situation for programmers since some of these trends take many years to evolve and are full of failures "lots of silver bullets around", rather I see this as an opportunity for the industry to evolve and in many ways go back to its roots to when quality was paramount and most programmers thought of work as a career and not just a job.

If what you say does come true then I welcome it for maybe we will finally see the end of companies like Yahoo and Google spreading poor coding practices and pathetic customer response practices. Yahoo's recent email disasters would have been laughed at as "Junior Mistakes" only a short time ago ... yet are currently praised by the likes of google as the "Way to develop".

Companies that take on your proposed approach can not only benefit from reduced development costs but much lower maintenance costs, higher customer satisfaction and probably more importantly the subtle benefit of dealing with a company whom you can trust to provide you with a quality product or service.  
Drew Conry-Murray
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Drew Conry-Murray,
User Rank: Ninja
2/26/2014 | 10:00:44 AM
Retraining?
What skills or capabilities do you see being in demand in this new environment you're predicting?
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
2/26/2014 | 10:28:22 AM
Re: Retraining?
We talked with the head of Bank of America's global infrastructure (David Reilly) about the skills he'll need in tomorrow's datacenter, and he talked about needing more software-centric infrastructure pros. An excerpt: 

Changing to a private cloud architecture and a software-centric datacenter will require different skills. Infrastructure pros today define themselves by the gear they run: "I run my company's million-port Cisco network," or "I manage our 50,000 servers." In a cloud model, as those technical silos get blown away, infrastructure pros will need more software skills. "The infrastructure professional will look a lot more like the software development professional," Reilly says.

Here's the full article:

http://www.informationweek.com/strategic-cio/executive-insights-and-innovation/bank-of-americas-why-stop-there-cloud-strategy/d/d-id/1113685


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