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Google Glass Prompts Attack, Woman Claims
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WKash
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WKash,
User Rank: Author
2/26/2014 | 12:25:44 PM
Re: Who's Fault?
Well said, Rob:  "...someone looking for attention. And she got the wrong kind."

Certainly she didn't deserve to be robbed. But the incident does illustrate how the use of Google Glass pushes into uncomfortable social territory -- and people's reactions aren't always going to be "Gee whiz."
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
2/26/2014 | 12:20:31 PM
Re: Who's Fault?
You're right; Google Glass bring up interesting social contracts. This incident happened inside a bar, in which case other patrons might have a reasonable expectation against being recorded without their consent by other customers. Certainly, the bar can (as some others already have) ban Google Glass and similar devices from being worn inside the premises.

But what about on the street? People are already legally allowed to take pictures of virtually anything they want in a public space. Google Glass will be a lot trickier in situations like that.

But the incident in SF seems to be about more than privacy inside a dive bar; it also seems to be about growing sentiment within the city that the tech boom is ruining local culture. Canter's comments in this article reflects that viewpoint, and the SF Chronicle's report on this incident tapped the same vein.

If the issue is not only privacy but also social inequity, this kind of aggression makes no sense-- just like the Google bus vandalism didn't. I think for a lot of angry people in the city, the focal point shouldn't be that techies are paid so well, given so many great perks, and positioned to have such a big impact on the rental market; wage and social inequality issues are systemic, much bigger than Google buses, and they should be treated as such.
Whoopty
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Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
2/26/2014 | 12:01:06 PM
Re: Who's Fault?
Nobody should blame her for the violence, that was clearly way too far. However, some measure of blame for at the very least, rudeness, if not somewhat anti-social behaiour, could be considered in her case. 

If someone is looking in your direction with a Glass headset on and you aren't familiar with its recording clues (though the fact that Google didn't opt for a red light suggests it's somewhat ok with the idea of stealthy recording) it would be the same as someone standing there with their phone pointed in your direction. You might assume they were filming you. 

While that should never give you the right to attack someone physically, asking them to stop shouldn't be beyond the realm of possibility. 
RobPreston
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RobPreston,
User Rank: Author
2/26/2014 | 11:59:13 AM
Re: Who's Fault?
...someone looking for attention. And she got the wrong kind.
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
2/26/2014 | 11:55:11 AM
Re: Who's Fault?
OK, let's be real: The biggest crime here was against fashion. Who goes out to a club wearing an ugly set of Google Glasses?
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
2/26/2014 | 11:44:42 AM
Re: Who's Fault?
"Canter said, 'It's 100% her, dude.'" This Canter guy evidently has a taste for hyperbole. Dude, "100%"? Really?

I agree, Rob; Maybe it's not a great idea to wear Google Glass into certain venues-- but to assign blame to the victim??? Unless there's a lot more to this story, that's ridiculous.
RobPreston
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RobPreston,
User Rank: Author
2/26/2014 | 10:22:13 AM
Who's Fault?
So it's her fault she was attacked and robbed? Bad judgment, maybe. But I've been in enough dive bars in my life to know that acting like a "hipster" isn't an excuse for assualt and robbery.
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