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Microsoft's Windows Strategy: A New Hope
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moonwatcher
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moonwatcher,
User Rank: Strategist
2/28/2014 | 7:05:22 PM
Windows 8.1: A New Hope
"The update coming this spring appears to still lack a Start menu, which will disappoint desktop users."

Then it will be a NON-STARTER for many users...pun intended, but VERY TRUE. What we desktop users who do real work want is for Windows 8 to look like Windows 7 (why throw out that nice Aero interface right when low end graphics cards can do it justice?), and have a freaking START menu that we've all become accustomed to over the last 13 years. It isn't that they couldn't do it to please users, its that Microsoft doesn't give a crap about their users...Well, maybe users should return the favor...
mak63
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mak63,
User Rank: Ninja
2/28/2014 | 5:09:37 PM
title
I like the title of the article: Microsoft's Windows Strategy: A New Hope. What's next, The Empire Strikes Back?
RobertT901
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RobertT901,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/28/2014 | 4:48:55 PM
IT Dinosaur
Having used almost every flavour of Microsoft's OSes (DOS, 3.1, 95, XP, NT, 2000, 7), I find myself increasingly wary of MS's products. I don't get more proficient in using it, especially the more recent iterations. I feel like a newbie, and my reaction to 8 is akin to a completely strange new product. I am still a heavy user of 7, and that's because some software I need to use have no Mac versions. In a sense, I've become an IT dinosaur.
mak63
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mak63,
User Rank: Ninja
2/28/2014 | 4:47:39 PM
Re: Not just for touch.
@mikemuch
Another thing I'm tired of hearing is that no one wants a touch-screen on a desktop or laptop.
I couldn't agree with you more. It's getting old, isn't it. Perhaps people who hate touch devices never touch one. (pun intended)
funkydow
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funkydow,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/28/2014 | 4:24:41 PM
Understating the threat to Microsoft
I think you have understated the threat to Microsoft: "Samsung is the only Android OEM that really makes much on devices. It's a problem with emerging-market domination. High volumes of low-margin devices don't necessarily translate to a lot of profit." Last quarter, Apple and Samsung accounted for 120% (sic) of net profits in mobile devices. That means all other competitors are not making "a lot of profit," rather they are losing huge amounts of money, more than 30% of net sales. Microsoft has deep pockets but giving away devices at a loss is not a strategy for success, at best it's survival until they find new markets or hope Apple and Samsung vanish. I don't think they have more than a couple of years before their mobile strategy has to be terminated. Perhaps they will find some very supportive enterprise partners who are willing to force their devices on unwilling employees. 
Greenleaf
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Greenleaf,
User Rank: Strategist
2/28/2014 | 4:24:12 PM
Re: Not just for touch.
Anyone who has used Windows 8/8.1 knows that it behaives a bit schizophrenically. I believe that trying to add touch to an operating system which wasn't made for touch was the problem with Windows 8. In order to have a smooth experiance an operating system needs to be designed from scratch. Microsoft did not have that luxury to do that because they had to carry their legacy software with them. Because of this Micosoft's OS now looks buggy with some applications responding to touch while others do not. Furthermore, third party applications which we made before Windows 8 don't work very well on Windows 8 so Microsoft broke a lot of legacy software with Windows 8. I believe that Windows 8 was a rush job to get Microsoft in the tablet game faster but I believe it over all hurt Microsoft and got Ballmer fired. 
jtiggy@gmail.com
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jtiggy@gmail.com,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/28/2014 | 3:45:47 PM
Re: Not just for touch.
I agree with mikemuch.  I was a beta tester for Windows 8 and its updates.  It was (and is fast on my desktop HP with a fast processor) not a touch screen computer.  But I learned something early on.  Microsoft's marketing tripped over its own feet as when you install Windows 8 you really get two OS and not just one.  Had Microsoft said Windows 8 desktop pretty much what you have been using all along but if you have programs you use a lot you can create a tile for them and just click on them to go to them faster.  Well, I thought so much of the beta product that I bought 8.0 and I thought so much of that, even with its need for fixes (which have been done) that I bought my wife a Windows Eight phone with the idea that once she was use to that I would introduct to her Surface.  Which I did!  She had adapted well to the phone and is adapting well to the Surface RT as she understands the tiles.  All she does is surf the internet, FaceBook and e-mail.  I am still weeing her off her 5 year old Nokia booklet which she had a lot of trouble with keeping it in the Wi-Fi mode.  When I showed her that the Surface could be either the new interface or the old desktop she warmed up even better.  As it turns out she is using the new interface more and more and not reverting to the desktop as much (I set that up for her just like the Nokia booklet). But, I also set the new OS up with tiles that went right to the programs and things she liles to do most. 

 

What about me?   Well, I still have a couple XP programs I need to run and therefore have to run XP in the Windows 7 OS or the 8.1 HYPER-V mode.  I one of those probrams will convert but the ACT! 6.0 won't and I 4,000 names in that database PLUS I can write letters with Word from office 2003.  I think what I am going to do, when money permits, is get a Surface Pro 2 with docking station.  I understand I can run Hyper-V on it (not on the 8 inch tablets form Dell or other sourcs) and move on that way.  I will then abanon my desktop HP running 8.1 execept for back up, and the HP notebook running Windows 7 for the Surface Pro 2.  I found my wife's Surface RT to be an amazing machine it does a lot stuff, but as it will not runn those two programs I will have to move to the Surace Pro Two.  Why would I want to do all this.  I need something I can do all my work on and take with me and not have to tranfere stuff back and forth, the note book is to heavy to keep carrying.  AND when I finally find it time to change my iPhone 4 (which I paid 650 for when I got it in 2010 so I am not ready to toss it yet) out I'll get the Windows phone as it  and the Surface can keep each other upto date via Skydrive. 

 

To bad GM screw up its marketing on the Volt.  They made the same mistake in only pushing the electrica aspect of the it which left the people worried about running out of power.  They should have said right up front that the Volt had a gas generator on board to keep the thing charged.  Had they done that the Volt would have sold more.
ricegf
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ricegf,
User Rank: Guru
2/28/2014 | 3:33:24 PM
Re: The Elephant in Microsoft's Living Room
We know some differences, of course. Microsoft's OS is based on a proprietary kernel, while Google's is open (Amazon, Microsoft / Nokia, Samsung, etc. have based products on it). Microsoft requires vendors to pay licensing fees for both their product and (through threat of lawsuit) Google's, while Google charges for neither. Microsoft's profits come from these licensing fees, while Google's come primarily from advertising. We also know some similarities. Both collect reams of personal data with which to personalize your experience (and to monetize). Both seek to license their products to third parties while also branding similar items themselves. I've used both products, but I'm more inclined to use Google at the moment - largely because of Microsoft's heavy-handed license enforcement. However, I'm even more inclined to explore other options, just to keep Google and Microsoft (and Apple) honest. ;-)
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
2/28/2014 | 2:43:14 PM
Re: The Elephant in Microsoft's Living Room
Thanks for bringing up the Nokia angle. We covered that news, too. See this article
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
2/28/2014 | 1:10:00 PM
Re: The Elephant in Microsoft's Living Room
Exactly - meet the new boss, same as the old boss. Or maybe not the same - at least MS is a known quantity.
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