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Microsoft's Windows Strategy: A New Hope
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mikemuch
75%
25%
mikemuch,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/28/2014 | 9:27:38 AM
Not just for touch.
Really sick of hearing this stuff about Windows 8/8.1 being only for touch devices. I've been using it on a desktop with mouse and keyboard and find it smooth and quick. After learning just a couple new habits, I feel like I can get around the OS faster than in legacy Windows OSes. Also sick of hearing the lamentation over the loss of the start button. The Start screen is just a full screen start button! With a little experience and setup, you can actually get to what you want--new or old-style app--faster with it. Just as with the old start button, just start typing to show the program you want. Or just put tiles for programs you use all the time in easy click reach.

Another thing I'm tired of hearing is that no one wants a touch-screen on a desktop or laptop. I just visited an older friend who got a new touch-screen Windows 8.1 laptop, and he very much likes the ability to just poke the item on the screen to start it.
ricegf
0%
100%
ricegf,
User Rank: Guru
2/28/2014 | 11:03:20 AM
The Elephant in Microsoft's Living Room
The elephant in the room, not mentioned in this enthusiastically optimistic story, is Microsoft / Nokia's introduction this week of 3 new Android phones. While the announcers tried to put on a brave front as to how this would "drive more volume to Microsoft services", it's pretty much an admission that they need Android to compete in the high-growth emerging market segments - in effect, the (very nice) Windows-based economy phones just aren't cutting it.

This is further evidenced by the actual market research, which shows that while Windows smartphones show promising growth rates as a percentage of market percentage (!), both Android and Apple sold a lot more additional phones than Microsoft / Nokia (the article hints at this quite gently). In effect, the math tricks hide the actual dismal state of Windows mobile product sales, to which the slow growth of the Windows application store attests.

And then there's Chrome OS's incredible surge in the 4th quarter (as every major laptop vendor introduced new Chromebook models), and utter domination of such bellweathers as the Amazon laptop bestseller list (4 of 5 are now Chromebooks, not Windows 8 laptops). This only adds to Windows 8's dismal failure in the desktop and laptop market. As XP's long delayed demise finally arrives only 5 weeks hence, XP still has a far larger installed base than 8.

Microsoft almost certainly has several more years of locked-in rich corporate "software assurance" revenues on which to subsist, not to mention their patent fees extracted from Android vendors under threat of massive legal action, which to date has kept their balance sheet looking healthy. Unfortunately, BYOD threatens to tip even corporate income into a death spiral, as when people bring their own devices to work, they tend to buy what they use at home, where Android and Apple reign and Chrome OS shines - which may leave Microsoft as a mere patent licensing and litigation shell of its former self in a few years.

The monopoly has clearly cracked, and competition has returned to computing. Finally.
rradina
50%
50%
rradina,
User Rank: Ninja
2/28/2014 | 11:24:31 AM
Re: Not just for touch.
I agree.  Every time Microsoft has ever changed something they alienate some/most/all existing customers.  I'm certainly not dismissing the idea that improvements to Win8's non-touch UI aren't needed or welcome  I'm just agreeing that any change always generates a certain amount of hate and that it's way past being thoroughly debated.
rradina
50%
50%
rradina,
User Rank: Ninja
2/28/2014 | 11:27:07 AM
Re: The Elephant in Microsoft's Living Room
Competition restored?  Maybe.  We might just be witnessing a passing of the torch to a new monopoly.
ricegf
50%
50%
ricegf,
User Rank: Guru
2/28/2014 | 12:12:40 PM
Re: The Elephant in Microsoft's Living Room
Yes, you're exactly right - with 81% of the worldwide smartphone market, Android is looking suspiciously like a monopoly-in-waiting on its own. I'm not really a proponent of Windows as a reaction, though - they already had a desktop monopoly, and that didn't end well.

Fortunately, we have several recent Linux-based challengers from which to choose - Firefox OS is shipping from several vendors on low-end phones, Jolla (the guys who bolted from Nokia when they switched to Windows) just began shipping a well-received mid-range smartphone from Finland colloquially known as The Other Half (cool hardware!), Canonical just announced two Ubuntu-based phones that will ship late this year, and Samsung has announced an actual Tizen-based phone and smartwatch after several delays.

If you're concerned about Android becoming a monopoly, I'd suggest supporting one of these products - but the price is that none of them are yet as polished as Android or iOS.

Personally I'm fond of Ubuntu, as they have a cleaner convergence story that anyone else I've seen. YMMV, of course - but if you're concerned about Google's growing market dominance, do consider voting with your dollars for ABA (anyone but Android).  ;-)
anon5351707475
0%
100%
anon5351707475,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/28/2014 | 12:31:18 PM
Re: Not just for touch.
Really sick of this, tired of hearing that. What's next...tell those darn kids to get off your lawn!
Lorna Garey
0%
100%
Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
2/28/2014 | 1:10:00 PM
Re: The Elephant in Microsoft's Living Room
Exactly - meet the new boss, same as the old boss. Or maybe not the same - at least MS is a known quantity.
Laurianne
100%
0%
Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
2/28/2014 | 2:43:14 PM
Re: The Elephant in Microsoft's Living Room
Thanks for bringing up the Nokia angle. We covered that news, too. See this article
ricegf
50%
50%
ricegf,
User Rank: Guru
2/28/2014 | 3:33:24 PM
Re: The Elephant in Microsoft's Living Room
We know some differences, of course. Microsoft's OS is based on a proprietary kernel, while Google's is open (Amazon, Microsoft / Nokia, Samsung, etc. have based products on it). Microsoft requires vendors to pay licensing fees for both their product and (through threat of lawsuit) Google's, while Google charges for neither. Microsoft's profits come from these licensing fees, while Google's come primarily from advertising. We also know some similarities. Both collect reams of personal data with which to personalize your experience (and to monetize). Both seek to license their products to third parties while also branding similar items themselves. I've used both products, but I'm more inclined to use Google at the moment - largely because of Microsoft's heavy-handed license enforcement. However, I'm even more inclined to explore other options, just to keep Google and Microsoft (and Apple) honest. ;-)
jtiggy@gmail.com
67%
33%
jtiggy@gmail.com,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/28/2014 | 3:45:47 PM
Re: Not just for touch.
I agree with mikemuch.  I was a beta tester for Windows 8 and its updates.  It was (and is fast on my desktop HP with a fast processor) not a touch screen computer.  But I learned something early on.  Microsoft's marketing tripped over its own feet as when you install Windows 8 you really get two OS and not just one.  Had Microsoft said Windows 8 desktop pretty much what you have been using all along but if you have programs you use a lot you can create a tile for them and just click on them to go to them faster.  Well, I thought so much of the beta product that I bought 8.0 and I thought so much of that, even with its need for fixes (which have been done) that I bought my wife a Windows Eight phone with the idea that once she was use to that I would introduct to her Surface.  Which I did!  She had adapted well to the phone and is adapting well to the Surface RT as she understands the tiles.  All she does is surf the internet, FaceBook and e-mail.  I am still weeing her off her 5 year old Nokia booklet which she had a lot of trouble with keeping it in the Wi-Fi mode.  When I showed her that the Surface could be either the new interface or the old desktop she warmed up even better.  As it turns out she is using the new interface more and more and not reverting to the desktop as much (I set that up for her just like the Nokia booklet). But, I also set the new OS up with tiles that went right to the programs and things she liles to do most. 

 

What about me?   Well, I still have a couple XP programs I need to run and therefore have to run XP in the Windows 7 OS or the 8.1 HYPER-V mode.  I one of those probrams will convert but the ACT! 6.0 won't and I 4,000 names in that database PLUS I can write letters with Word from office 2003.  I think what I am going to do, when money permits, is get a Surface Pro 2 with docking station.  I understand I can run Hyper-V on it (not on the 8 inch tablets form Dell or other sourcs) and move on that way.  I will then abanon my desktop HP running 8.1 execept for back up, and the HP notebook running Windows 7 for the Surface Pro 2.  I found my wife's Surface RT to be an amazing machine it does a lot stuff, but as it will not runn those two programs I will have to move to the Surace Pro Two.  Why would I want to do all this.  I need something I can do all my work on and take with me and not have to tranfere stuff back and forth, the note book is to heavy to keep carrying.  AND when I finally find it time to change my iPhone 4 (which I paid 650 for when I got it in 2010 so I am not ready to toss it yet) out I'll get the Windows phone as it  and the Surface can keep each other upto date via Skydrive. 

 

To bad GM screw up its marketing on the Volt.  They made the same mistake in only pushing the electrica aspect of the it which left the people worried about running out of power.  They should have said right up front that the Volt had a gas generator on board to keep the thing charged.  Had they done that the Volt would have sold more.
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