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Two Approaches To In-Memory Database Battle
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D. Henschen
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D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
3/4/2014 | 12:26:21 PM
The two camps explained
One camp is adding in-memory features to conventional database management systems -- Data Stax, IBM, Microsoft, Oracle, Teradata -- the other camp is starting with all-in-memory DBMSs (Aerospike, MemSQL, SAP Hana, VoltDB and a few others). Interestingly, MemSQL recently added flash and disk storage options, acknowledging the occassional need for longer-term, historical data that doesn't belong in RAM.
BRIAN_CIAMPA
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BRIAN_CIAMPA,
User Rank: Strategist
3/5/2014 | 12:34:44 PM
Re: The two camps explained
Thanks so much for the article.  Forgive the question if it seems too basic (I'm kind of new to the in-memory stuff) but what is the purpose of having two in-memory options?  Is it that Oracle will be offering a relational database that can be used as both a transactional system and allow for in-memory analytics while HANA only offers in-memory analytics?
D. Henschen
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D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
3/6/2014 | 5:31:49 PM
Re: The two camps explained
No, you didn't get that quite right. SAP and Oracle are competitors and both are proposing in-memory technology to provide speed advantages where needed. SAP Hana is an all-in-memory database, and it says its platform won't just speed cruicial processes up, it will also allow you to eliminate data aggregates, materialized views and other copies of data that were created to get around disk I/O constraints. Oracle has a very popular incumbent database, and it's adding an option to put selected databse tables into memory while still being compatible with legacy deployments of its database and legacy apps that run on that database. Microsoft is also taking this approach (and will get there first, by mid 2014) with SQL Server 2014.

Readers should dig into this column and the deeper feature to get deeper insight on what each strategy promises and what customers using these products have to say about advantages and benefits.
MarkF018
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MarkF018,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/10/2014 | 7:07:38 PM
What Attributes Makes It an In-Memory DBMS?
Doug -

Although I've been doing quite a bit of reading, I'm still trying to get my head around just what makes something an In-Memory DBMS.  One of my touch stones for comparing what appears to be a relatively new notion is the relatively older IBM i operating system (a.k.a., AS/400, S/38) with its integrated DBMS.  Within this OS, every byte of the DB resides persistently within the system's address space from the moment the byte of created.   Although IBM i does support a notion of Process-local addressing, there need not be any notion of mapping of DB files into an address space since the tables and indexes (and what have you) already have an address that any process/thread can use during its access.  Now couple that with a large amount of DRAM - I understand now approaching or above the terabyte range - the DRAM then acts as a cache for the DB objects residing persistently on HDD/SDD.  Given all of that, picture a DRAM large enough to hold the active DB objects and all other control structures.  So does this constitute an "In-Memory DBMS"? 

 

Mark
McObject
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McObject,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/11/2014 | 12:15:36 PM
Inaccurate dates
Doug, SolidDB didn't have an in-memory option (then called the Boost Engine) until the mid- 2000s.  Prior to that, it was a conventional disk-based DBMS. It's not really relevant to the main thrust of your article, but I thought the historical record should be clear.


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