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NASA's $17.5B Budget Keeps Asteroid Mission On Track
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Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
3/5/2014 | 11:23:24 AM
Re: Good news
Everyone is hailing the public/private partnership to end our deal with Russia -- however, consider that this is not just about money and rides to space. It's about international cooperation. No, it wasn't enough to make Putin a responsible actor on the global stage, as the Crimea situation shows, but it must foster some goodwill among the Russian people.

The world is getting smaller and more interconnected and I'd like to see more partnerships for lofty human endeavors like landing on asteroids, not fewer.
ElenaMalykhina
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ElenaMalykhina,
User Rank: Author
3/5/2014 | 11:15:46 AM
The next great observatory
One fact that didn't make it into the story: $4.97 billion of NASA's budget will go toward science, including the 2018 launch of the James Webb Space Telescope, dubbed the "next great observatory." It will serve thousands of astronomers worldwide and allow them to study every phase in the history of our universe.
Whoopty
IW Pick
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Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
3/5/2014 | 10:01:11 AM
Good news
It's great to hear that the US space programme is going to regain some measure of independence from Russian spacecraft soon enough. 

I'm also blown away that it's a feasable goal to land humans on an asteroid. Hitting a target that small in space takes some incredibly impressive calculations, especially since they won't really be able to rely on their target's gravity to capture them as they could with a planet. 


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