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Windows 8.1 Update 1: 10 Key Changes
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Mark532010
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Mark532010,
User Rank: Strategist
3/7/2014 | 12:37:39 PM
all ui and no internal changes?
no mention of internal changes such as the ability to actually uninstall a metro app? (right now, metro apps only uninstall for the current user, anyone else that logs in has all the apps installed again. You have to go into powershell to actuall uninstall something) which makes it almost unusable in a corporate environment.

 
barely_normal
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barely_normal,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/7/2014 | 1:39:08 PM
Re: all ui and no internal changes?
I did not know that, but it shows how much Microsoft is losing sight of its greatest cash cow, the enterprise. When Windows 7 is no longer available, they'll really have businesses exercising their downgrade rights, while looking to move away from Windows ASAP.
UberGoober
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UberGoober,
User Rank: Strategist
3/7/2014 | 1:43:49 PM
Yawn...
Contratulations, Win8.1 Update 1 now sucks less on a desktop.  Compared to every other modern desktop OS it still sucks A LOT, though. 

Its time to admit failure and bring back a UI that closely resembles Win7, at least as an option. Win7 was the highly polished (for Microsoft) end-result of a couple of decades of evolution.  It does what Windows users want to do in a pretty decent fashion that over half a billion people already know how to work.

If we can't admit failure, give us something like OS-X.  Or KDE.  Or Gnome.  Ad nauseum.  There are a dozen or more shells out there that are vastly better than Win8.
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
3/7/2014 | 3:24:22 PM
Re: Yawn...
Thanks for weighing in. Desktop user frustration coming through loud and clear here. Perhaps the tweaks did not go far enough?
UberGoober
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UberGoober,
User Rank: Strategist
3/7/2014 | 3:27:17 PM
Re: Yawn...
There is no way anything that can be called a 'tweak' will fix Win8.  If M$ wants to keep the 'Modern' UI for real computers (as opposed to tablets, which are primarily entertainment-consuming platforms), it should be in a window inside the traditional desktop.
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
3/7/2014 | 3:37:17 PM
Re: Yawn...
I would disagree that tablets are primarily "entertainment-consuming platforms." In all manner of industries, salespeople are using tablets as primary device now -- at home office and in the field. Many knowledge workers can do what they need to on a tablet. Tablets may have started out as "nice to have" but they have become must-have at many enterprises. Also, go to any C-level gathering (board meeting, conference, etc.) and you will see all tablets.
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
3/7/2014 | 3:44:38 PM
Re: all ui and no internal changes?
Oh, PowerShell... There's an industry of Microsoft partners who exist just to make PowerShell less difficult to deal with.

Anyhow, you bring up an interesting point. Microsoft brought a bunch of enterprise capabilities online with Windows 8.1, but some are still missing. But is that really what's keeping enterprises from adopting?
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
3/7/2014 | 3:50:53 PM
Re: Yawn...
Agreed, Laurie. I find tablets limiting for certain kinds of productivity, but I think it's inaccurate and myopic to whitewash tablets as consumption devices. We explored various workplace tablet use cases in a magazine article last spring, and just today, Eric Zeman stated most knowledge workers could probably get by with Samsung's new 12-inch tablet.
UberGoober
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UberGoober,
User Rank: Strategist
3/7/2014 | 3:52:46 PM
Re: Yawn...
I don't suppose you would care to make a small wager on how most tablets are used, would you?


Yes, many are used essentially as big-screen smart-phones in business, but even then, the vast majority are used for information consumption; very few are used for much besides reading or looking stuff up.  For consuming information they are unquestionabley handy, but for most uses, tablets are terrible for creating it; typing on glass and pointing with a half-inch-wide finger makes for terrible ergonomics.

You can trot out the old bromide about salespeople all you want (people have been doing it for well over a decade), but you can't say with straight face that 20% of tablets are used primarily for business; I'd bet the number is much less than 10%. 


For the C-level meetings, c'mon.  Nobody is more style-obsessed than a high-level corporate guy.  Actual business use is not guaranteed by having an iPad in your hand.

 
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
3/7/2014 | 3:55:47 PM
Re: Yawn...
Interesting point, UberGoober. Some of the same people who leaked accurate Update 1 rumors claim that windowed Modern apps will arrive in Windows 9 next year. But by then, too little too late? It seems like a feature that might have been included from the start-- what's the delay? And are there any Modern apps that users are hankering to run in a window on the desktop?
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