Comments
Drones In Action: 5 Non-Military Uses
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FrankB223
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FrankB223,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/14/2014 | 8:46:23 PM
Better "harden" them
Most of the guys I know would be offended by a drone like this coming near private property and may "flash back" to the good old days of 65 thru 74 and perhaps display some remnants of their PTSD. Seriously, what the hell has become of the government doing everything in the name of security, safety, citizen protection etc. with equipment that clearly has the potential to violate, indeed erase many constitutional rights.  At least a manned helo has less potential to be deployed frivilously, due in part to the high operating costs.
Madhava verma dantuluri
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Madhava verma dantuluri,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/11/2014 | 11:10:27 PM
Interesting
Very interesting article, i believe usage of drones would increase more in the future in the areas of survellience and safety.
UberGoober
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UberGoober,
User Rank: Strategist
3/11/2014 | 10:24:28 AM
Scary Drones!
Frankly, severral of the posts about this article are more than a little silly; the scary word 'drone' makes a lot of otherwise sensible (or not) people drift off into night sweats; the 'community outrage' over a radio controlled helicopter with cameras on it run by the Seattle PD is a perfect example.  As someone else pointed out, how exactly is it different in concept from a perfectly acceptable but infinitely more expensive (and capable) manned helicopter?  Don't even get me started on the frankly silly suggestion that the noise from drones is impacting the health of Afghanis; even neglecting the fact that an F-16 is about 30dB louder than a Reaper, have you ever seen an Afghani celebrating by ripping off a clip from his AK using ear protection?


Right now today in America, TV shows are using RC camera copters to get overhead shots all the time; watch vitrually any show on HGTV and realize they aren't hiring boom trucks anymore.  These are 'drones,' and if I'm sunbathing naked in my fenced back yard next door, someone might get a brutally unattactive view.   Anyone want to ban that?  Is the loss of privacy offset by the huge savings in carbon footprint versus the boom truck?  Should we ban aircraft, which can do the same thing, but are mostly owned and operated by the evil 1%? 


Technology marches on, and it is important to be aware of what it means, but the 'drone' genie is out of the bottle.  We're going to have to learn to live with it.
WKash
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WKash,
User Rank: Author
3/11/2014 | 9:08:20 AM
Re: Drones and privacy
vchristy601, this list does a great job of illustrating the challenges policy makers have in front of them. One thing's for sure, these are questions that go beyond the FAA's jurisdictional air space. Even if we work out what rules and regulations should be established for operationg domestic drones, the big question remains, who will be able to really enforce them?

 
vchristy601
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vchristy601,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/10/2014 | 2:40:28 PM
Re: Drones and privacy
Many issues with drones start to pop up as we begin to explore some of the issues including:
  • Noise from overhead (a constant issue for many in Afganastan where it affects health),
  • Air rights (where will I loose my ability to build up for what ever reason in order to allow others to fly over),
  • liability (if I don't register my antenna, your drone crashes who is liable for the damage to drone, and property below),
  • privacy (if you can just hover over the 'hood' with infrared imaging, you can count how many people are congregating inside my home - are we watching Monday night football or overthrowing Saddam?), 
  • traffic - If I set up routes to look at an area and you jump into my 'route' (delivering pizza) and crash into my security monitoring (I am running a security company and now patrol by drone). Who pays?
  • Why will only good guys use? If I am burglar, I will 'monitor' an area until I can see who has left, and monitor if they are coming back. Let's all spend more on security and paranoria.
  • Drone fighters by the bad guys fighting the police drones (who pays for when they crash on my kid)
  • How will this change the expectation of response by public serices? If the drone can see an issue, how quickly can I expect a human (and car) to respond?
  • Using drones to bring medical help - telemedicine, 1st aid supplies, lighting to dark situations, road block to dangerous road areas after accident.
  • Will the assumption that everything will be recorded (will a drone monitoring be admissable in court as evidence for a traffic accident)?
  • The ability to eavedrop on my WiFi traffic (by NSA or private enterprise)

There is a whole series of issues to look at when our world moves from basically 2 dimensional to 3 dimensional in how we measure, monitor and record. When action move from 2 dimension to 3 dimension, the complexity goes from playing 'normal chess' to 3-d chess.  Who is ready?  Too bad, the future is here. We will need to build our legal structure in '3d' where much is still in 1 dimension.

 
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
3/10/2014 | 2:35:27 PM
Re: Forest Fire Detection
msmith,that is an interesting example. Thanks for bringing it up. the next question is what else do the fire-watching drones get to scan for -- and what is off limits.
Dengood
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Dengood,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/10/2014 | 1:12:09 PM
Police Drones
Its okay to operate a police chopper to chase a suspect at a cost of who knows what but a drone, no way?  This does not make sense.
jagibbons
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jagibbons,
User Rank: Ninja
3/10/2014 | 12:35:58 PM
Re: Forest Fire Detection
There has to be a way to utilize drones in lifesaving and crime fighting applications without trampling the 4th Amendment. Putting a machine a place where human lives are routinely lost or, at least, very much risked, is too compelling to sit on the sidelines. It will take time and various checks-and-balances, but these issues will be resolved in the next couple of years.
msmith801
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msmith801,
User Rank: Strategist
3/10/2014 | 12:14:40 PM
Forest Fire Detection
In 2012, the High Park Fire in Northern Colorado smoldered as a small fire for a day and a half before erupting into a firestorm that consumed 87k acres of forest.  Could it have been detected by a drone when it was still small and effectively dealt with?  I think the answer is yes, but oversight governing which instruuments are on a drone that is flying over private property needs to be in place.
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
3/10/2014 | 11:12:49 AM
Drones and privacy
Law enforcement use of drones could create plenty of controversy during the next few years. What other uses worry you on a privacy level, readers?


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