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Can Wearable Tech Prevent Healthcare Errors?
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Truthis!
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Truthis!,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/13/2014 | 8:57:27 PM
Re: Fatigue
Very much agree
David F. Carr
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David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
3/12/2014 | 3:30:15 PM
Re: Fatigue
If the hospital is sufficiently worried about medical errors (and lawsuits), its managers ought to be paying attention to issues like fatigue.
David F. Carr
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David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
3/12/2014 | 3:28:24 PM
Re: Fatigue
@Whoopty,

This particular column was about using wearables to track the hospital workforce, not the patients, although any system that tracked factors like fatigue would by definition be recording some health relevant data about the employees.

You raise an important big picture question about protecting healthcare data if we're going to start collection a lot more of it, as seems to be the trend.
@sreeseRNMBA
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@sreeseRNMBA,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/12/2014 | 10:51:37 AM
Re: Potential ... and potential stumbling blocks?
David, I think you've hit the nail on the head...how the technology is introduced will be critical to its adoption!
@sreeseRNMBA
IW Pick
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@sreeseRNMBA,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/12/2014 | 10:49:51 AM
Re: wearable tech
Great question Lorna! There are devices today used in the transportation industry that can detect an individual's ocular 'blink' rates and determine if they are fatigued. I can only imagine the technology will improve and be increasingly less intrusive.
Whoopty
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Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
3/12/2014 | 10:23:49 AM
Re: Fatigue
That's something I'm more than a little worried about though. While I can see the benefits would be huge with having masses of consistently recorded data on a patient, where is that being stored? How secure is it? Will the NSA be able to look through it for whatever reason? How valuable would that information be if it was stolen? 

Big data has so much potential, but it needs to be very carefully thought out so that should a problem arise, we're three steps ahead. Especially when it comes to people's health. 
Gary_EL
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Gary_EL,
User Rank: Ninja
3/11/2014 | 10:54:41 PM
Fatigue
When the nurse manager detects fatigue, she'll allow the nurse to take a rest??? Not any hospital any of my nurse pals have ever worked at. Call in a replacement?  There aren't any available, because every one of them who wants to be is already employed. The greatest health care potential for wearables is in patient monitoring. Imagine the wealth of information that can be gathered stored, and studied. This is a job for Big Data.
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Ninja
3/11/2014 | 3:43:44 PM
Re: Potential ... and potential stumbling blocks?
@David definitely, the presentation and explanation of its use is key to getting real utility out of it.
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
3/11/2014 | 2:48:42 PM
Re: wearable tech
Question -- how can a wearable device detect fatigue?
David F. Carr
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David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
3/11/2014 | 9:32:50 AM
Potential ... and potential stumbling blocks?
What potential can you see for wearables in the hospital? Is this likely to be a category of technology hospital employees will embrace or resent for the way it tracks their activities? My guess is that how the technology is introduced will make a big difference.
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