Comments
H-1B Visa Demand Spike Predicted
Oldest First  |  Newest First  |  Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
Laurianne
100%
0%
Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
3/13/2014 | 10:27:47 AM
Talent shortage?
The statements about not being able to fill entry-level jobs will not ring true with many job seekers, I am sure. It is not surprising that security skills are in high demand this year; this is one area where non-H-1B applicants have an edge in some verticals right now. A friend at a defense contractor told me recently that security stars at that company write their own tickets right now.

 
Lorna Garey
100%
0%
Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
3/13/2014 | 11:12:29 AM
Re: Talent shortage?
Seems like one way to ensure employers aren't passing over qualified US applicants is to require an H-1B hire be paid the going rate for the role, based on industry salary data. Is that an area subject to verification?
n6532l
80%
20%
n6532l,
User Rank: Strategist
3/13/2014 | 12:15:56 PM
Left and Right Agree
Conservative Nobel winning economist Milton Friedman said "There is no doubt, that the [H-1B] program is a benefit to their employers, enabling them to get workers at a lower wage, and to that extent, it is a subsidy."  Socialist Senator Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) says "What many of us have come to understand is that these H-1B visas are not being used to supplement the American workforce where we have shortages but, rather, H-1B visas are being used to replace American workers with lower cost foreign workers."
DDURBIN1
100%
0%
DDURBIN1,
User Rank: Ninja
3/13/2014 | 12:25:40 PM
Lack of investment in Americans continues
After over 20 years of "filling the gap" with foreign IT workers you would think there would be Americans available by now.  When we are short of ICU nurses we don't go to India for them.  When we are short of teachers for special needs students we don't go to India for them.  When we have a shortage of ANY other profession we build at home.  Why are we still NOT doing this for IT jobs? 
DavidF222
100%
0%
DavidF222,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/13/2014 | 12:29:01 PM
What they government
What the government is doing is a disgrace

There are plenty of American's that can do these jobs.  There are enough people on unemployment that can fill these voids in IT and other areas.  They only differences are that

The American works are more experienced and have higher salary expectation.  The foreign workers are willing to take lower salary handed out to them because the government doesn't

step in to protect American workers like the foreign governments do.   Most foreign countries protect their workers from layoffs, downsizing, etc.  They aren't allowed.  We should be more

like Canada, where all jobs must be filled with an Canadian before it can be outsourced to someone from another company, they have to prove that there aren't any workers available to fill that spot.

Why is the US government allowing big companies to outsource to foreign companies without being penalized, they should lose all tax breaks when they close up shops or IT departments outsource

to foreign workers.  It's about time that the US government stands up for the American people.
RobPreston
100%
0%
RobPreston,
User Rank: Author
3/13/2014 | 2:48:39 PM
Re: Talent shortage?
That's already a requirement, Lorna. "You must be paid at least the actual or prevailing wage for your occupation, whichever is higher." But that doesn't mean employers don't skirt the rules.
 
DAVIDINIL
100%
0%
DAVIDINIL,
User Rank: Strategist
3/13/2014 | 3:15:00 PM
Re: Talent shortage?
Absolutely correct.  The companies that seek H1-B visas have no desire to hire American workers.  They have no desire to provide training for Americans to aquire these skills.  Industry wants IT workers to come ready made and to have born the cost of training out of the workers pockets.   Industry prefers younger immigrants who are willing to put in hundreds of hours of unpaid overtime. 

How can American I.T. applicants compete against Indian workers that have had training subsidized by the Indian government?   Workers that do not have family obligations.  Workers that are young and come without any healthcare needs.  Workers that are here for a few years and then take the money and go back home to India. 

It is disgraceful that our legislators are selling American jobs to oversees workers. 

Let's also add that this is huge contributor to the income gap that we see in America.  These are the middle class jobs that are being offshored.  Of course we now have a widening gap between the haves and the have nots.  Congress is seeing to it that we do by using H1_B's. 
tka2013
100%
0%
tka2013,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/13/2014 | 6:39:31 PM
Re: Left and Right Agree
While he espouses certain socialist ideas Sen. Sanders is not a part of any of the Socialist parties in the US. It would be accurate to classify Sen. Sanders is a registered Independent who frequently caucuses with Democrats. What is more relevant is how few Democrats or Republicans come out expressly for or against the H1B programs for fear they will alienate their high tech industry contributors.
n6532l
100%
0%
n6532l,
User Rank: Strategist
3/14/2014 | 12:53:14 AM
Re: Left and Right Agree
Regarding Sander’s political leanings point taken. I was trying to say that smart people see the H-1B for what it is. Two who have expressed candidly about the H-1B are former Senator Robert Bennett (R-Utah) and Representative Tom Davis (R-VA). Bennett said "Once it's clear (the visa bill) is going to get through, everybody signs up so nobody can be in the position of being accused of being against high tech. There were, in fact, a whole lot of folks against it, but because they are tapping the high-tech community for campaign contributions, they don't want to admit that in public." Rep. Tom Davis (R-Va.), said, "This is not a popular bill with the public. It's popular with the CEOs. This is a very important issue for the high-tech executives who give the money"
n6532l
100%
0%
n6532l,
User Rank: Strategist
3/14/2014 | 1:35:57 AM
Re: Talent shortage?
While there is a requirement that H-1Bs be paid the “prevailing wage” when the rules for determining that wage are applied the resulting wage is 20-30 percent less than what an American would earn. As entrepreneur turned academic Vivek Wadhwa of Duke University put it: “I know from my experience as a tech CEO that H-1Bs are cheaper than domestic hires. Technically, these workers are supposed to be paid a ‘prevailing wage,’ but this mechanism is riddled with loopholes. In the tech world, salaries vary widely based on skill and competence. Yet the prevailing wage concept works on average salaries, so you can hire a superstar for the cost of an average worker.”
Page 1 / 2   >   >>


The Business of Going Digital
The Business of Going Digital
Digital business isn't about changing code; it's about changing what legacy sales, distribution, customer service, and product groups do in the new digital age. It's about bringing big data analytics, mobile, social, marketing automation, cloud computing, and the app economy together to launch new products and services. We're seeing new titles in this digital revolution, new responsibilities, new business models, and major shifts in technology spending.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Tech Digest - July 22, 2014
Sophisticated attacks demand real-time risk management and continuous monitoring. Here's how federal agencies are meeting that challenge.
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.