Comments
DevOps Demands You Fix Twice
Threaded  |  Newest First  |  Oldest First
Lorna Garey
50%
50%
Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
3/13/2014 | 11:20:56 AM
OHIO principle
This flies in the face of the venerable "OHIO" (only handle it once) principle that says, "once you've taken time to understand a problem you should just fix it." Otherwise, you must circle back and redo that work of garnering insight. And of course, time is no friend of memory.

Would you recommend spending time during the first fix to thoroughly document the problem?
rbhargava
50%
50%
rbhargava,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/14/2014 | 9:04:50 PM
Re: OHIO principle
Lorna – thanks for the comment. Yes, absolutely, if a team has time to document the problem and understand it deeply while it is occurring then that is positive. Saving artifacts and materials that would help you recreate the issue or remind you of the depth of the problem is important if you can do that too. The challenge in all of this, of course, is that in many DevOps / modern environments their infrastructure is their life blood and when that is down they are losing something significant for their business – e.g. ability to accept orders, logistics, support, etc. That means the first priority is just get back to normal operations which leaves little time during an outage or issue to spend time evaluating the best way to solve the issue permanently. This is a tricky issue, but I think with increased pressure on keeping systems operating, fixing a solution quickly ends up becoming the norm. The real challenge is in making sure that you really do go back and solve the problem more completely and sustainably after.

 

-Rajat
akeenan452
50%
50%
akeenan452,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/14/2014 | 11:33:10 PM
Re: OHIO principle
Having been in IT for decades I remember this as finding a workaround. Some software has to run no matter what. So you identify the problem quickly and come up with a workaround that will allow it to run. Think of it as ER stabilizing a patient. This give you breathing room so you can identify a true solution. With the speed software is being produced it is now common for software to be released that is not idea but is useful. It is expected that in the next release refinements and enhancements will be made. It is also common to add a feature only to remove it later. People may believe they need something only to find out later that it is a sortof nice to have. Now we can remove features as well as add them.
richardkmiller
50%
50%
richardkmiller,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/18/2014 | 6:22:05 PM
Re: OHIO principle

Hi Lorna! I think "fix twice" actually goes well with "only handle it once" if we're thinking long-term. When a system fails, everyone makes it first priority to get back to the baseline. It's a fire. Drop everything. Stephen Covey would call this quadrant 1 -- important and urgent.

 

However, once we're back to baseline, there's usually little organizational pressure to do anything more. It takes a special mindset to take the fix further, preventing a future recurrence. This would be quadrant 2 -- important but not urgent.

 

It's the 2nd fix, preventing a future recurrence, that is most loyal to "only handle it once" because (theoretically) we should never have to return to the issue. That's how I think about it.

 

 

Lorna Garey
50%
50%
Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
3/18/2014 | 6:37:01 PM
Re: OHIO principle
Kevin, I guess I'll buy that. I do think it'll be a telling indicator of the maturity of an org's devops practice as to how religiously they do circle back. One a fire is out, it's human nature to move on.


The Business of Going Digital
The Business of Going Digital
Digital business isn't about changing code; it's about changing what legacy sales, distribution, customer service, and product groups do in the new digital age. It's about bringing big data analytics, mobile, social, marketing automation, cloud computing, and the app economy together to launch new products and services. We're seeing new titles in this digital revolution, new responsibilities, new business models, and major shifts in technology spending.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Tech Digest September 23, 2014
Intrigued by the concept of a converged infrastructure but worry you lack the expertise to DIY? Dell, HP, IBM, VMware, and other vendors want to help.
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.