Comments
Google, Microsoft Pressure Asus To Cancel Dual-Boot Tablet
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
anon0238696789
50%
50%
anon0238696789,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/11/2014 | 7:20:47 AM
Great Shame
I would have loved to have a dual-boot tablet or better still side-by side Windows/Android. 

I have some favourite programs on Windows and there are lot of nice apps on Android. I can't see myself buying a very experive Android tablet, just as I can't see myself buying a very expensive Windows tablet as both are limiting for me.  Having a combined platform makes for an interesting proposition. 


I had my eye on the Samsung ATIV Q, but it has not been released due to problems with Windows/Android co-existence. The Samsung ATIV Q, had everything keyboard for Windows use and touchscreen for android. I am sure it would have been expensive knowing Samsung, but at least people have options. 

The tablet also needs to have mini-HDMI and capability for 4k monitor output.... thats the future.  
Etoxqui
50%
50%
Etoxqui,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/10/2014 | 9:46:34 AM
Asus and Intel in the right path. The market want what they have ready to share...
Right now the expanding market is in the youngest and future buyers segment. They know what they are looking for. Those companies that don't recognized it will lose market participation very soon. Asus has built a rock solid business computers (as years ago were recognized Thinkpads because were built to last), also has powerful gaming laptops, and has recognized a big market to reach into, first with students and after with professionals. For millennials generations, don't like the rules and are used to constant change. And the game's rules are changing. Intel has the right perception and Asus as Huwei the right products but not the regulated rules by their side. Younger owners said Win 8.1 is not as bad but has a big weakness: Application market. Android has a rock solid Application market. The future in short to middle term is for dual products. I don't want to spend money in three physical devices: laptop, tablet and phone. But logically only have two: Android or windows. The best will be have all devices in one has Asus showed to the market: Business laptop, excelent tablet and I have two world in one device. Only missing the phone. Apple is the solid challenger to defeat...for a while.
Stratustician
0%
100%
Stratustician,
User Rank: Ninja
3/19/2014 | 2:53:24 PM
Re: Dual-boot tablet appeal?
It's not hte hardware that worries me, its the cross contamination of platforms via apps, or at least the potential chaos that could come from it.  For one, if the two OSs are sitting in their own partitions, there is data duplication issues, causing less than ideal performance from the device.  If they do indeed talk to each partition, where does support lie?  is it an Android tablet or a Windows tablet?  from a marketing perspective, Microsoft would probably want to piggyback on one of the hottest platforms (Android) to help boost numbers, but it might also fear that users who purchase it for using Windows will falter to the Android platform, although the opposite could potentially happen as well.
SaneIT
100%
0%
SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
3/18/2014 | 8:37:38 AM
Re: A big step by Intel
That is interesting.  When one party sees the benefit I guess it makes people wonder if it's really good for them too.  I don't know that the fear should be a dual boot system though. I think the bigger fear should be applications being run natively or with minimal emulation inside another OS.
Michael Endler
100%
0%
Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
3/17/2014 | 5:48:06 PM
Re: A big step by Intel
"Intel is the biggest loser here. It engineered processors that are capable of running two operating systems, and these chips were to play a crucial role in the dual-boot machines in question"


Here's an interesting point that's tangential to this quote... at CES, Intel reps strongly implied, though did not say, that "dual OS" had Google's blessing. Specifically, they said Intel worked with Google to make Android run on x86 chips-- but that likely refers to Atom smartphones and tablets, not the Core-based "dual OS" chip in the Asus Transformer. It struck me at the time that the comments were carefully worded.
Michael Endler
50%
50%
Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
3/17/2014 | 5:43:56 PM
Re: good idea, but whats with special intel processors?
@kgreenhow530, you make a good point. Windows Phone-Android smartphones seem to be coming along, regardless of this reported hurdle to Windows 8.1-Android tablets and hybrids. Running Android and Windows on an ARM chip seems to be one thing; running Windows 8.1 and Android on an Intel Core chip seems to be another.
CraigHerberg
100%
0%
CraigHerberg,
User Rank: Strategist
3/17/2014 | 1:49:56 PM
Re: Dual-boot tablet appeal?
Personally, I would love to be able to run Windows and Android apps side by side, or at least be able to run Android apps in a virtual machine within Windows.  Dual-boot may have more appeal to software developers.  Craig Herberg 
kgreenhow530
50%
50%
kgreenhow530,
User Rank: Strategist
3/17/2014 | 9:39:46 AM
good idea, but whats with special intel processors?
Why do we need a special processor to run both? I thought windows 8 rt and android could run on processors like snapdragon? I think the public should demand this kind of product. Consumers are the ones who are spending the money and already carrying multiple devices. Besides if the giants continue to say no, the tech savy public will just create what they want through other third party methods.
SaneIT
100%
0%
SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
3/17/2014 | 8:58:57 AM
A big step by Intel
"Intel is the biggest loser here. It engineered processors that are capable of running two operating systems, and these chips were to play a crucial role in the dual-boot machines in question"

 

This is the first I have heard about these processors and I have to say that this is incredible news.  Even if the bigger manufacturers don't put out a dual boot device if Intel has the chipset then someone is going to do it.  This will be a nice step up from running Android applications in an emulator.
rradina
50%
50%
rradina,
User Rank: Ninja
3/16/2014 | 9:11:13 PM
Re: Windows used to 'fix' Linux
Can you expand on this?  I've never heard of this "feature" in Windows.  When was this?  Which version of Windows?  Which version of Linux.  When you say you put it in it's own disk space in the machine, can you explain further?

Was this along time ago before things like VMWare, VirtualBox or Parallels?  I've never used parallels, but I haven't had trouble when using VMWare or VirtualBox to run Linux under Windows.
Page 1 / 2   >   >>


The Business of Going Digital
The Business of Going Digital
Digital business isn't about changing code; it's about changing what legacy sales, distribution, customer service, and product groups do in the new digital age. It's about bringing big data analytics, mobile, social, marketing automation, cloud computing, and the app economy together to launch new products and services. We're seeing new titles in this digital revolution, new responsibilities, new business models, and major shifts in technology spending.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Tech Digest - August 27, 2014
Who wins in cloud price wars? Short answer: not IT. Enterprises don't want bare-bones IaaS. Providers must focus on support, not undercutting rivals.
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Archived InformationWeek Radio
Howard Marks talks about steps to take in choosing the right cloud storage solutions for your IT problems
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.