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Google, Microsoft Pressure Asus To Cancel Dual-Boot Tablet
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Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
3/14/2014 | 3:49:59 PM
Dual-boot tablet appeal?
What do you think, readers? Would you like a dual-OS tablet te get access to Android apps? For another reason? 
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
3/14/2014 | 4:14:48 PM
Re: Dual-boot tablet appeal?
These seem niche at best. If you're an enterprise or gov/edu shop looking to issue machines that can run Windows apps and Android, there are ways to do that without buying Frankenhardware. So that leaves consumers.
Charlie Babcock
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Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Author
3/14/2014 | 5:30:38 PM
Windows used to 'fix' Linux
This reminds me of the time I tried to put Linux in its own disk space on a Windows Machine, and Windows detected it immediately. It wouldn't allow any processes to continue until it was allowed to adjust Linux. When it was done, Linux was several files shorter. It was clear Windows had snipped something off, I couldn't tell what, but Linux wouldn't run. I guess the guest has been "fixed," I decided. There was even a third party product to block this action.
moarsauce123
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moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
3/16/2014 | 8:18:52 AM
Re: Dual-boot tablet appeal?
Dual-boot tablets have zero appeal. If anything, I want to run Android and Windows apps side by side with full integration. There is point in having to swap out the entire OS and wait for it to boot just so that I can start one app, find one piece of information, write that down on a piece of paper or push it to cloud storage, then boot back into the other OS to continue my work.

Asus should be happy that MS and Google put the breaks on, even when the motives are very questionable. Especially from Google's side as they always claim that Android is 'free'.
rradina
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rradina,
User Rank: Ninja
3/16/2014 | 9:11:13 PM
Re: Windows used to 'fix' Linux
Can you expand on this?  I've never heard of this "feature" in Windows.  When was this?  Which version of Windows?  Which version of Linux.  When you say you put it in it's own disk space in the machine, can you explain further?

Was this along time ago before things like VMWare, VirtualBox or Parallels?  I've never used parallels, but I haven't had trouble when using VMWare or VirtualBox to run Linux under Windows.
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
3/17/2014 | 8:58:57 AM
A big step by Intel
"Intel is the biggest loser here. It engineered processors that are capable of running two operating systems, and these chips were to play a crucial role in the dual-boot machines in question"

 

This is the first I have heard about these processors and I have to say that this is incredible news.  Even if the bigger manufacturers don't put out a dual boot device if Intel has the chipset then someone is going to do it.  This will be a nice step up from running Android applications in an emulator.
kgreenhow530
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kgreenhow530,
User Rank: Strategist
3/17/2014 | 9:39:46 AM
good idea, but whats with special intel processors?
Why do we need a special processor to run both? I thought windows 8 rt and android could run on processors like snapdragon? I think the public should demand this kind of product. Consumers are the ones who are spending the money and already carrying multiple devices. Besides if the giants continue to say no, the tech savy public will just create what they want through other third party methods.
CraigHerberg
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CraigHerberg,
User Rank: Strategist
3/17/2014 | 1:49:56 PM
Re: Dual-boot tablet appeal?
Personally, I would love to be able to run Windows and Android apps side by side, or at least be able to run Android apps in a virtual machine within Windows.  Dual-boot may have more appeal to software developers.  Craig Herberg 
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
3/17/2014 | 5:43:56 PM
Re: good idea, but whats with special intel processors?
@kgreenhow530, you make a good point. Windows Phone-Android smartphones seem to be coming along, regardless of this reported hurdle to Windows 8.1-Android tablets and hybrids. Running Android and Windows on an ARM chip seems to be one thing; running Windows 8.1 and Android on an Intel Core chip seems to be another.
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
3/17/2014 | 5:48:06 PM
Re: A big step by Intel
"Intel is the biggest loser here. It engineered processors that are capable of running two operating systems, and these chips were to play a crucial role in the dual-boot machines in question"


Here's an interesting point that's tangential to this quote... at CES, Intel reps strongly implied, though did not say, that "dual OS" had Google's blessing. Specifically, they said Intel worked with Google to make Android run on x86 chips-- but that likely refers to Atom smartphones and tablets, not the Core-based "dual OS" chip in the Asus Transformer. It struck me at the time that the comments were carefully worded.
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