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It's A New Dell
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sammythehead
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sammythehead,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/29/2011 | 12:58:15 AM
re: It's A New Dell
Simon,

I believe he was actually recognizing that IBM is his greatest competitor here by making this comment. He was merely saying that the market for providing comprehensive business solutions is still limited in certain areas, such as Tier 4 cities. I would imagine the market for "business outcome" solutions would be great in Tier 1-3 cities in China. By making this comment he's making the point that Dell understands their is still a market for their laptops and PC's.
WVORIS000
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WVORIS000,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/21/2011 | 9:47:37 PM
re: It's A New Dell
If you go out into the future 10 years ... maybe you talk to your computer, maybe it's a hologram, maybe it's blasted on your retina, who knows? Me, see William T. Voris' web site for details.
gwebster329
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gwebster329,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/21/2011 | 1:21:39 PM
re: It's A New Dell
I donG«÷t want to get into any argument about who makes the best G«£stuffG«•. I can only pass on our personal experience as a business customer. In this recent case, Dell went from being and exceptionally good vendor to really poor.
And, I also mistakenly left out our Apple experience. Our music department does have a cart of 25 MacBooks, a couple of iMacs and a MacBook Pro. On the downside, they have had a very high failure rate (and high initial cost). The upside, Apple service and repair has been first rate.
Guest
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Guest,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/21/2011 | 4:24:17 AM
re: It's A New Dell
If you are going for quality, it is Apple on the PC side and IBM on the server side. They may cost you a bit more, but they will last twice as long and you will spend less time on the phone with support telling you that they understand and can't help.
gwebster329
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gwebster329,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/19/2011 | 4:06:39 AM
re: It's A New Dell
I wish that Mr. Dell could (would) read the pages of email trying to keep this summerG«÷s purchase of OptiPlex desktops working. Unfortunately, we own 60 of these computers that are only four months old. The mini-towers have a failure rate of 40% and the small form factor rate is now more than 10%. (In four months!)
I have spent dozens of hours of working with Dell Support across the last three (3) months. Only one Dell individual, Lee Kahler (Lee_Kahler@dell.com) has been able to provide any real help. And, even in that case, it appears to be a workaround rather than a permanent solution for some of our issues with the OptiPlex 390 desktops. I am certain that I will need to continue my relationship with Dell support. I am equally certain that there is nothing I can do that will improve the once great product or once adequate service.
We are a small charter high school of 650 students. Until very recently, we have been a postcard advertisement for Dell. All 14 of our physicals servers are Dell. Two years ago we made our first non-Dell purchase of 25 HP thin clients. That same year, we began to have failures of that summerG«÷s purchase of 30 Dell, Vostro Desktops. This summer we purchased a cart of 25 HP laptops for the math department with no issues to date. That purchase decision was based on price/performance comparisons with Dell. Today, 90 days later, Dell would not be considered based on their demonstrated lack of reliability. Also, at anything below the supervisory level, their service personnel have demonstrated an equal lack of knowledge, professionalism and even basic manners.
I continue to be a great admirer of Michael Dell. I believe that he is providing first class leadership in very difficult times. I believe he has no one else watching the other sides of his ship. Will I buy more of his computers or recommend them to my kids? Not likely!

Guest
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Guest,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/17/2011 | 8:52:51 AM
re: It's A New Dell
Michael Dell is talking out of both sides of his mouth. He wants to drive "customer outcomes" and work on business solutions, yet he is belittling IBM's "Smarter Planet" initiative, which Dell apparently doesn't realize are industry "business outcome" solutions, and thinks companies want to focus on "basic computing." He wants to work on "Big Data" (never mind that Dell has no ECM software, analytics software, or even infrastructure optimized to the task), but he is focused on growing the commodity PC market and maybe smartphones and tablets, not sure.

Net: Dell is going to try to be great at everything. It sounds like a company trying to find its way. They want to be IBM... and Oracle... and Apple... and still beat HP and Lenovo on the commodity side.


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