Comments
Mobile Health Apps Reshape Food Industry
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D. Henschen
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D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
3/24/2014 | 10:52:13 AM
Keeping a food diary will open your eyes
I met with a nutritionist five years ago because I was working out but not losing weight. The first thing he recommended was keeping a food diary. It takes a little work to log everything you consume, listing the calories and adding things up to make sure you don't go over 2,500 calories a day (for a man, 2,000 for a woman), but it will open your eyes on your eating habits.

Now there are all sorts of mobile apps that make keeping food diaries much easier, providing drop-down listings of foods with calorie totals and alerting you when you're going off cource. Fitbit, for example, includes a food diary feature. The upshot of my food-diary experience was a 30-pound weight loss, and it's something you sort of internalize after a month or two, so you don't have to keep doing it -- unless you run into trouble again. Think of it as small-data insight that pays big health dividends.
mistyairhead
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mistyairhead,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/24/2014 | 11:03:36 AM
Food Apps for Recipes
There are a lot of apps out there, like the article mentioned, that give recipes but not a lot of apps that explain why eating certain foods cause diseases like diabetes, cancer or glucose intolerance. One good recipe app is Recipes by Ingredients, by AB Mobile Apps. Everyday health has several apps worth checking out.

Sincerely,

Misty
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
3/24/2014 | 12:23:36 PM
Cost of this data
One thing that may be holding food transparency back is cost -- margins are pretty thin except for the niche areas you mentioned (GF and non-GMO, etc.) where consumers are willing to pay to know where ingredients came from. I'm not sure we'll see such willingness for factory producers and restaurants operating with diverse and constantly changing supply chains. 

In Australia and Europe, laws on disclosing GMOs probably play a role in forcing disclosures. Hopefully we will catch up as IoT and other advances make this data more affordable to collect. 
David F. Carr
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David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
3/24/2014 | 1:27:34 PM
Re: Cost of this data
If the accountable care trend succeeds in shifting the emphasis to prevention and wellness, money may start to flow from Medicare to support programs and supporting apps for moving people to a better diet -- keeping people healthy, rather than paying for another prescription. A couple of years ago, Medicare began reimbursing for the program Dean Ornish developed for addressing heart disease with lifestyle changes including better diet and yoga.

The documentary Escape Fire does a good job of laying out the potential for change from a sick care to a healthcare system that emphasizes health. I was able to watch it free with an Amazon Prime subscription.
David F. Carr
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David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
3/24/2014 | 2:14:19 PM
Re: Cost of this data
Dean Ornish: "Obamacare turns economic incentives on their ear, so it becomes economically sustainable for physicians to offer training in comprehensive lifestyle changes to their patients, especially now that CMS is providing Medicare reimbursement and insurance companies such as WellPoint are also doing so."

- Forbes.com interview: The STAT Ten: Dean Ornish On Digital Health, Wisdom And The Value Of Meaningful Connections http://buff.ly/1hgIZaq 
Samanthabigail
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Samanthabigail,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/2/2014 | 2:08:08 AM
Food in our life
As food is very essential for all living organisim to survive, the demand of food is increasing with respect to poulation. People are very health concious and like to take hygenic and organic food. Many people are busy with their life and have no more time to spend for their food. It is the best way to get sufficient nutrition from certain foods. Now it is possible. Our farming sector produce more organic foods which are good for health.


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