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Windows XP Game Over: 9 Upgrade Options
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Yoavraz
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Yoavraz,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/26/2014 | 9:32:51 PM
Norton 360 - a possible solution for continuing with no upgrade?
I have been using for almost a year Norton 360 after a sever virus infection on my Win machines: Two XP Prof (Pentium 4, one from 2002 which started with 0.25G memory; failed HD replacement years ago under warranty) and two Win 7 (all with memory upgrades to 2G) running standard home apps including video streaming for TVs, being used as main machines at home. Since I statrted with 360 my machines perform smoothly and effectively at a very reasonable speed and look healthy as never before. I hope (and see no reason why not) that Symantec continue to support. The old Wins look stable, and I see no reason to upgrade as long as the HW is functioning...
MikeS048
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MikeS048,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/26/2014 | 3:45:03 PM
Re: Why no independent third party support?
What kind of support are people looking for? OS Support and at what level? Many of us who have been doing this for over 30 years can probably satisfy most levels of need. All it takes is thinking outside the currently popular box which most young people just cannot seem to do. Our company has many customers who after talking to the "geeks" and salespeople and "techs" out there come to one conclusion - that the younger set rationalize everything as - if it wasn't invented yesterday as an "app" ( what a word! ) its not current and not the way to solve a problem. Give us all a break! So what kind of support are you all looking for?

That's not to say that new technologies and innovations don't have their place. But plans have to be rational and appropriate to the customer's current and "slightly" future need. So what kind of support are you all looking for?
AgentG
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AgentG,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/26/2014 | 3:32:26 PM
Microsoft's fails again
There are a number of relevant issues not mentioned here.  For one, upgrading an XP system also will require upgrading all the software, which can easily outweigh the costs of new hardware, if even at all possible.  So, the generic options in this column of all possible upgrade paths are not really anything but a market survey presented as advice.  Also, many vendors chose to discontinue driver support after XP for printers, scanners, etc. so that would also have to be replaced.  These are all tangible costs and wasted time versus *potential* security risks that no one can predict.

Also, having just installed two new XP machines in the last 6 months, I can say with certainty that the performance of XP on any given machine is much better than Win7 or Win8.  It is much faster, more responsive and works great, even with the 4GB limitation of 32-bit memory addressing, because it is a simpler and slender OS.  XP was a major technological achievement after Windows 95 and 2000 and represented the best and most modern OS architecture ever developed.

What is truly amazing is that the IT industry and its pundits have a terrible record at predicting calamities (Y2K !) and not predicting real threats (malware) and generally seem to be unaware of what many users actually experience and are faced with.  This comes from the 'orifice' arrangement as noted by Steve Jobs where most IT products are purchased by someone for use by someone else, so that the industry perceives a distinction between users and customers.  Thus, many 'customers' don't give a crap about user problems, convenience, or wasted time, which feeds back to terrible products produced by the IT industry.  Win8 really comes to mind here, as well as so many other products/platforms that are more about strategic market share of vendors than actual user functionality.  Perhaps the best evidence for this is the 30% market share of XP to this day, which does not scream that the OS needs to be replaced, but that this OS is doing its job very well.  What companies like Microsoft are truly blind to is the great service these older machines are still providing on a daily basis, which does not seem to get recognized or used as a positive marketing tool for Microsoft, though it is the most powerful and compelling economic argument to use MS products.  This is the blindness at MS that has prevented development of products that XP users would have migrated to, so I see it as an abject marketing failure by MS that the adoption rates for Win7 and Win8 are so low in the product lifetime cycle compared to XP.
MikeS048
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MikeS048,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/26/2014 | 3:29:00 PM
Re: Windows XP
Whta kind of support are you looking for?
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
3/26/2014 | 3:09:58 PM
Re: My XP laptop works like a spare tire
Commodore huh? How much storage you have on that puppy :) ?
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
3/26/2014 | 3:08:27 PM
Re: Why no independent third party support?
Excellent question. Why no 3rd party support. Are companies afraid of being sued by Microsoft?
Carney3
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Carney3,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/26/2014 | 1:44:54 PM
Re: My XP laptop works like a spare tire
"Not as old, but my Commodore 64 with a 1541 is still working as well as it did when I first got it. Back then companies build quality and had reliable designs. When I compare that to what Dell delivers these days then we have gone many steps back."

 

The 1541 was notoriously unreliable.
Carney3
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Carney3,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/26/2014 | 1:42:11 PM
Re: Great Options
"Oh - please. Nobody is going to retrain billions and billions ( thanks Carl Sagan ) of desktop people into Linux. Its a pipe dream. And I like Linux for myself. But lets get real."

 

Yes Ubuntu does have a user interface that would be unfamiliar to Windows XP users.

But there are plenty of Linux distros that have the more familiar look and feel, with the taskbar at bottom, clock at the lower right, Start button equivalent at the lower left, open top, menubars in the windows, and windows featuring close button with an X at their upper right. 

 

PCLinuxOS is a good example of a Linux distro that is made with Windows migrants and Linux newbies in mind, needing essentially no retraining for Windows users, and "just works" on the vast majority of hardware.  If you need professional tech support, Red Hat is out there too.
billcird
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billcird,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/26/2014 | 12:31:04 PM
Re: Windows XP
Mike, any ideas where I can find XP support.
AndrewfOP
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AndrewfOP,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/26/2014 | 11:47:00 AM
Upgrade from XP because of hardware? oh, please.
Let's stop pretending that one of the reasons to upgrade from Windows XP because the older PC is not as powerful as the tablets and smartphones that are everywhere today.  If the older PCs indeed have lest computing power than the devices today, we will be see docking stations for the tablets and smartphones.  Granted, the devices power by ARM architecture are far more energy effecient than PCs or any other computing device that requires external power source, yet bit by bit, computation by computation, tablets and smartphones are NOT more powerful than most existing PCs.  They just seem so because of the bloated windows and the applications that run on the OS.

Quite frankly, as someone who works in IT supoort on the side and emphathizes with the average users, as long as you know what the risks about computer security are, and don't do much banking or bill paying online, you DON'T ever need to upgrade until the computer doesn't run anymore.  By then, you can get a device with maybe a decent Windows next time, or you can always go to the library and have someone else do the worrying for you.
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