Comments
Windows XP Game Over: 9 Upgrade Options
Threaded  |  Newest First  |  Oldest First
pajaritomt
50%
50%
pajaritomt,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/25/2014 | 12:02:15 PM
Where to buy Windows 7?
Is there any way to buy Windows 7 without buying an entirely new PC?   My old one works fine but doesn't have a touch screen so it is not suitable for Windows 8.1.  Anybody selling old Win 7 licenses?

 
Michael Endler
100%
0%
Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
3/25/2014 | 12:06:00 PM
Re: Where to buy Windows 7?
Lots of system builder Windows 7 licenses are available online. They don't entitle you to the normal customer support you'd get with a new PC, or with a Windows 8.1 license, however-- so be sure to read the fine print before purchasing. Also, in early April, Microsoft is expected to release a Windows 8.1 update that will make the OS more usable on non-touch hardware. I'd expect to hear details at Build-- that is, a few days before XP loses support. So if you can afford to wait until the last minute, Windows 8.1 might become more viable.
David F. Carr
100%
0%
David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
3/25/2014 | 12:10:13 PM
Re: Where to buy Windows 7?
As the story mentions, it's still possible to buy an OEM license. I found them on NewEgg.
David F. Carr
100%
0%
David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
3/25/2014 | 12:03:14 PM
XP to Linux
Sometime InformationWeek contributor Ellis Booker has built a side business around helping consumers and businesses make the jump to Linux, rather than sending their old PCs to the landfill. Check out YourHomeLinux.
Michael Endler
100%
0%
Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
3/25/2014 | 12:08:00 PM
Re: XP to Linux
Thanks for that link, David. I think Linux is a terrific alternative for machines that would otherwise go into landfills.
anon7520925202
100%
0%
anon7520925202,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/25/2014 | 12:22:00 PM
Microsoft shooting self in foot
With the popularity of XP, Microsoft is shooting the whole world in the foot for not maintaining updates, and virus protection for XP.  With XP computers accessing and co-mingling with Windows 7 and 8 systems XP offers a barn door for access to those systems as well.
billcird
50%
50%
billcird,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/25/2014 | 12:23:43 PM
Installing Auto Cad 2000
I have Auto CAD 2000 on my XP. What system will allow me install this program?
moonwatcher
100%
0%
moonwatcher,
User Rank: Strategist
3/25/2014 | 12:30:59 PM
Re: Installing Auto Cad 2000
i FOUND THIS ON A FORUM: Information to help you load and run AutoCAD 2000 on your Windows 7 (64bit) system.
I had to upgrade from Windows 7 Home edition to Windows & professional ($90.00)
Then I downloded Windows virtual PC and Windows XP Mode (free download). The Windows XP Mode runs in the background (in its own window). I loaded AutoCAD 2000 Architectural Desktop from my software CD. As I was doing this I had to go to the program compatibility (start-programs-accessories-program compatibility - pick 'from C D drive') I changed the compatibility to windows 98/ me.

I was glad to have found this so I don't have to spend $1000 to $5000 to upgrade AitoCAD.

Also I have a driver that lets me run my HP 750c+ plotter on Windows 7 - 64bit if you need that.
moonwatcher
50%
50%
moonwatcher,
User Rank: Strategist
3/25/2014 | 12:54:52 PM
Re: Installing Auto Cad 2000
bill, If you are not creating any 3-D models in AutoCAD 2000 and are using is as a bread and butter 2-D program, you might consider trying the FREE Draftsight program. It works great - as good as AutoCAD LT, and like I said it is FREE, and has a lot of support help files, documents, and forums available. Do a Google search for it. Dassault Systems puts it out as an adjunct to their full blown 3-D solid modeling program called Solidworks.

It will run on several different O/Ses....Windows 7, 8, and maybe even Ubuntu....

We use it a lot where I work for easy manipulation of DXF and DWG files.

Good luck.
billcird
100%
0%
billcird,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/25/2014 | 1:31:36 PM
Re: Installing Auto Cad 2000
thanks, will check it out.
YaarovS134
50%
50%
YaarovS134,
User Rank: Strategist
3/25/2014 | 12:24:39 PM
My XP laptop works like a spare tire
It just sits in the corner of the room, unplugged.

When my Vista laptop crashes for any reason, I will turn on the XP laptop to continue cyberlife journey while getting the Vista fixed.
Fantasm
50%
50%
Fantasm,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/25/2014 | 3:58:23 PM
Re: My XP laptop works like a spare tire
I too have an XP system as a spare... It's not going to get hacked as long as it's not online...

 

Then, for that matter... I saw the quote in the article, " Some of you don't want to say goodbye to Windows XP any more than you wanted to retire the Atari.  "

 My Atari 800 is also sitting here... tested it a couple of months go... still works... Now if I could only find that Star Raiders cartridge...

 
Michael Endler
100%
0%
Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
3/25/2014 | 4:16:27 PM
Re: My XP laptop works like a spare tire
"My Atari 800 is also sitting here... tested it a couple of months go... still works... Now if I could only find that Star Raiders cartridge..."


Haha, that's pretty awesome. And impressive! I've had some gadgets last a long time, but an Atari 800 has to be around 35 years old. That's a long time for it to remain functional.
moarsauce123
100%
0%
moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
3/26/2014 | 8:04:35 AM
Re: My XP laptop works like a spare tire
Not as old, but my Commodore 64 with a 1541 is still working as well as it did when I first got it. Back then companies build quality and had reliable designs. When I compare that to what Dell delivers these days then we have gone many steps back.
Carney3
100%
0%
Carney3,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/26/2014 | 1:44:54 PM
Re: My XP laptop works like a spare tire
"Not as old, but my Commodore 64 with a 1541 is still working as well as it did when I first got it. Back then companies build quality and had reliable designs. When I compare that to what Dell delivers these days then we have gone many steps back."

 

The 1541 was notoriously unreliable.
Laurianne
100%
0%
Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
3/26/2014 | 3:09:58 PM
Re: My XP laptop works like a spare tire
Commodore huh? How much storage you have on that puppy :) ?
Shane M. O'Neill
100%
0%
Shane M. O'Neill,
User Rank: Author
3/25/2014 | 12:27:41 PM
The Windows/Mac crossroads
Staying on XP just seems reckless at this point due to security and performance weaknesses. At some point old school becomes Old. I imagine most XP users who enjoy the Windows experience will want to stay with it via a Win 7 PC (if they can find one) or Windows 8. But Microsoft should be wary of XP holdouts coming to a crossroads where they're turned off by the radical redesign of Windows 8 and are looking to make a fresh start with a Mac or an inexpensive Chromebook.
Michael Endler
50%
50%
Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
3/25/2014 | 12:39:45 PM
Re: The Windows/Mac crossroads
"But Microsoft should be wary of XP holdouts coming to a crossroads where they're turned off by the radical redesign of Windows 8 and are looking to make a fresh start with a Mac or an inexpensive Chromebook."

Indeed. The May and June desktop usage share reports should be very interesting. In February, there were still upward of half a billion XP systems in use. With a lot of people rushing to upgrade, all that market share has to go somewhere. I think it's safe to say that Windows 7 will absorb more XP users than any other OS. But how many people will stick with XP over the next three months? How many will jump to a Chromebook, a Mac, or Linux? How many of the XP PCs will be replaced by a tablet instead of another PC?

With Windows 7 and 8.1 still accounting for more than half of PC users, it's not like Windows is going to evaporate in importance overnight or anything, especially in the enterprise. But I think it's likely that Windows falls below its historical 90% share of the PC market. But how far below? It might seem far-fetched, but if Windows were to fall to, say, 85% of the PC market, I wouldn't be surprised to see a lot of doomsday commentaries about the future of Windows (as opposed to, say, the future of Microsoft software that lives in the cloud, instead of tethered to the OS). 85% would still be a huge number-- but it would represent tens of millions of lost core customers. It would also suggest a much grimmer share of recent PC sales, and given the prominence of Windows 7 in the workplace, a near-complete flop among consumers.

Since Nadella took over, Microsoft has been emphasizing cross-platform opportunities more than ever. On the one hand, this rhetoric is in some ways a natural extension of Ballmer's "software and services" framework, which was never proposed as a completely closed garden. But on the other hand, the ramped-up emphasis might imply that Microsoft realizes Windows is less important than it used to be, and that the company isn't in position to reverse the tide.
WKash
100%
0%
WKash,
User Rank: Author
3/25/2014 | 2:52:23 PM
Re: The Windows/Mac crossroads
Michael, I'm curious, what's your take on Microsoft's efforts to move enterprise customers to its cloud subscription model, with Office 365, and how that might play out here if users start considering other OSs?. (Microsoft's subscription plans give users the ability to retain a desktop version of MS's Office suite --  Word, Excel, etc..-- so I presume Microsoft has a big incentive to keep users on some version of Windows OS to operate those offline.)   
Michael Endler
50%
50%
Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
4/11/2014 | 6:03:12 PM
Re: The Windows/Mac crossroads
Sorry, Wyatt! I missed this question.

I think Microsoft is doing a strong job moving Office and other core properties to the cloud. It's not a perfect antidote to incfreased OS competition; the Mac Office products haven't been updated in some time, for example, and Microsoft will have to show broader benefits to persuade some people that subscriptions are better than standalone purchases. Indeed, they'll have to show broader benefits to persude some people that subscriptions are better than all the free products that have emerged. 

For enterprise customers, I think Microsoft is already making a good case, and Office for iPad could signal some  consumer progress, though the company still seems to have a hazier strategy there. If Cortana, the Windows Phone 8.1 digital assistant, is released for iOS and Android before the end of the summer, that would be a strong statement.
AndrewL437
50%
50%
AndrewL437,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/25/2014 | 12:35:03 PM
Windows XP
There are countless work and personal computers using XP that will continue to function after April. For computers working without an internet connection or behind adequate firewalls and security systems XP will continue to work just fine. The real issue is when a replacment is required. As computers age the components become more difficult to find.
Michael Endler
50%
50%
Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
3/25/2014 | 2:23:06 PM
Re: Windows XP
Absolutely, many XP computers will continue to run after April, especially in businesses. And that's not necessarily a problem, if those computers aren't connected to the Internet and/or are otherwise receiving their due attention from IT.

But I'd hesitate to say the "real issue" is component degradation. That's not to say it's a bad point—in fact, it's a really good one. I'm constantly amazed that some people put so much effort into defending 12-year-old computers; unless you replace everything inside the machine, at some point, everything starts to slow down or fail. Even if XP keeps working for your needs, the hardware itself is hardly immortal.

But even so, I think the security  risks are a "real issue." Perhaps not for knowledgeable IT folks (or at least I hope not, given how much sensitive information some of them are safeguarding). But for average users who don't ravenously follow technology? For at least some of them, I fear it could be a very real issue.
johnggold
50%
50%
johnggold,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/25/2014 | 3:27:12 PM
Re: Windows XP
I think that when you talk about defending XP, it is really looking at the problem the wrong way round. In fact you are defending the need to upgrade.

There has to be a benefit to users for an upgrade to be justified. For many users there are threats e.g withdrawal

of security support, but precious few benefits.

In many businesses, PCs are single function - running company specific software, mostly blocked from Internet access.

Windows 7 offers little benefit to those users, so why upgrade.

Many factory machines are networked for data transfer. We see many DOS machines as well as Windows NT, still functioning perfectly well, but now a real pain to connect to the last OS. These machines cannot be upgraded. An XP PC in the server room has to remain as a bridge.

The industry should not forget what happened to IBM, when it tried to force PS2 architecture on a market that just wanted faster PCs and bought Compaq instead, because it offered PCs that were simply faster.

For those users who are really worried about security or have to buy a new PC or laptop, I can thoroughly recommend Classic Shell - a free download that converts Windows 8 to look like XP, Vista or Windows 7, without losing Windows 8 features, as and when you feel the need.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
MikeS048
100%
0%
MikeS048,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/25/2014 | 4:57:52 PM
Re: Windows XP
With over 35% of users still using XP - most do not care if Microsoft issues updates or security fix, etc. WIndows 8 is a bust and is going the way of WindowsME and WindowsVista. Most users running XP legacy applications also do not want to migrate to Windows 7. There are many companies out there that are going to continue to support XP and XP applications until the market share of XP drops below 10% whicj could take another 5-10 years. Those that do jump to Windows 7 "feel" they need to because they "feel" they are being left out on the Web not because of a pressing need. Windows 7 or Windows "9" is the way to go for most users of XP feeling left out from the web.
billcird
50%
50%
billcird,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/26/2014 | 12:31:04 PM
Re: Windows XP
Mike, any ideas where I can find XP support.
MikeS048
50%
50%
MikeS048,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/26/2014 | 3:29:00 PM
Re: Windows XP
Whta kind of support are you looking for?
Michael Endler
50%
50%
Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
3/25/2014 | 5:55:12 PM
Re: Windows XP
@johnggold,

Thanks for the comments. You bring up many good points, but regarding "defense of upgrades," please allow me to clarify.

Certainly, there are a number of valid reasons that some XP users will choose not to upgrade. As you point out, there are a lot of locked-down, single-application systems out there. It's an issue we explored in some detail in a recent article. I can appreciate why these people aren't upgrading, or why they're doing so somewhat grudgingly. That said, I'm not sure this is the group that's vocally criticizing Microsoft, or painting the company as some kind of bully that's forcing everyone to buy new products. After all, these people are the ones who have the least urgency the upgrade. They know the risks, how to contain them, and what they're gonna do. As far as their needs go, newer computers and operating systems don't provide enough benefit, so there's no reason to upgrade. Case closed.

But remember—sources like Net Applications indicate that nearly 30% of desktop Internet users relied on Windows XP machines last month. It derives its data from Web use, so these statistics are very much derived from real Internet traffic. Other sources peg the figure closer to 20%-- but either way you slice it, we're talking about hundreds of millions of XP computers that are still connected to the Internet. These aren't PCs being carefully safeguarded by a knowledgeable IT admin; they're just normal computers used by normal people. With so many people still using XP to get online, many of them will almost certainly become vulnerable if they maintain their current usage patterns.

There's a variety of scenarios at play. Some people (e.g. IT professionals) will keep using XP because it's actually the best choice for their needs. Others will keep using it because they consider it a compromise but still the best overall value. And so on.

But then there are the people who use XP because they're genuinely dragging their feet, or because they truly don't understand the risks. I know average people who use their computers for email and the web every day, and who generally have almost no idea what operating system is running. For people in this position, it's hard not to defend upgrading.

I also know of businesses that still shackle knowledge workers with decrepit XP laptops. XP might be fine for running a few applications in isolation. But suppose you have, say, my job-- the OS would quickly become a productivity killer! Research on a deadline requires multi-tasking, as does collaboration. All of those screen freezes and system crashes are eventually going to take a toll. I thankfully haven't had to use XP for several years—but again, this is not a hypothetical situation. I have friends who lose hours of productivity every week simply because their XP computers are so darn slow. A few months ago, I might have interpreted these corporate-issued XP laptops as a sign of managers and decision-makers who have no idea what's actually going on among the rank and file. Now, it just seems pretty irresponsible.

My point is, there are reasons both to defend sticking with XP and to defend upgrading. Sorry if that got lost at certain points!

Also, good call with Classic Shell. Windows 8.1 users who've wanted a Start menu generally seem pretty pleased with it.
dlats
50%
50%
dlats,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/25/2014 | 12:42:35 PM
ReactOS
Another alternative is ReactOS. http://www.reactos.org/ It's compatible with all software and drivers written for win xp. Fittingly there is a new version that will be available on April 8.
moonwatcher
50%
50%
moonwatcher,
User Rank: Strategist
3/25/2014 | 12:42:57 PM
If Microsoft really cared, they'd offer $100 off the upgrade price of Windows 7
Instead of using the demise of XP as an excuse to further push an unloved O/S (Windows 8, etc.) on the masses, it would have been far better to have offered Windows 7 Home Premium (or whatever version) at $100 off the suggested retail price.

Many would jump at spending $30 to $40 to move to Windows 7, especially those with circa 2006 hardware.

Well they didn't, so I've done the next best thing: Installed Ubunutu as a dual-boot option and made a back up of my drive image to an external drive and the necessary rescue disk. I plan on only using the XP box on the Internet for iTunes and perhaps a subscription music service called MOG. Otherwise I'll use Ubuntu for Yahoo, Facebook, and other sites.

My 73 year old neighbor is using Ubuntu already and was up and runing after only 20 minutes of instruction. She is happy, but has also moved to an iPAD and a wireless AirPrint printer.

I still hate to see so many millions of perfectly good PCs end up in the landfills. That will be sad.

And please. No one I know still running XP has a machine that takes more than just a few minutes to boot. In fact, it is almost as fast as my Windows 8.1 box and far easier to navigate.

I will drink a toast on April 8th to good old XP. We knew you well, and will mourn your passing. Imagine, some of those Microsoft young employees might have gone from grade school through college only using one O/S: Windows XP.

One can only hope that memory will serve them well as they morph the disaster of Windows 8 into Windows 9.

Ross
pajaritomt
50%
50%
pajaritomt,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/25/2014 | 12:43:01 PM
Should I buy Win 7 Pro or Win 7 Ultima?
What does Ultima offer than Win 7 Pro 64 bit doesn't offer?   How do I decide which to buy?
Michael Endler
50%
50%
Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
3/25/2014 | 2:07:56 PM
Re: Should I buy Win 7 Pro or Win 7 Ultima?
I'm pretty sure the difference is that Ultimate includes BitLocker and support for more languages, and takes up more drive space. Otherwise, it's essentially the same as Pro. Windows 7 Ultimate is basically a repackaged version of the Enterprise edition that Microsoft sells in volume license deals to businesses.
codyhalter281
0%
100%
codyhalter281,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/25/2014 | 1:45:01 PM
Good Info
just as Rebecca said I can't believe that you able to get paid $8327 in four weeks on the computer . site here>
>>>>>> w­w­­w­.­b­a­y­9­1­.­C­ℴ­M
billcird
100%
0%
billcird,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/25/2014 | 2:02:20 PM
up grading XP
Can I upgrade my XP to Windows 7, or 8?

Just had it upgraded the past year, so have good system. 

 
Michael Endler
50%
50%
Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
3/25/2014 | 2:15:07 PM
Re: up grading XP
Possibly. Here are the system requirements for Windows 8.1 and Windows 7. If your computer is objectively a "good system" by any modern standard, then you have a decent shot.
billcird
50%
50%
billcird,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/25/2014 | 4:21:07 PM
Re: up grading XP
Have 3.20 GH, 3.17 GH ram
Michael Endler
100%
0%
Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
3/25/2014 | 4:32:06 PM
Re: up grading XP
That sound promising. You can get the Windows 8.1 Upgrade Assistant here. Run it and it will tell you if your system is up to snuff. Also, it might be useful to check out some of the other posts in this thread about motherboard compatibility and other possible hardware issues. Just because your machine has enough RAM and a fast enough processor doesn't necessarily mean it will run Windows 8.1, depending on other components.
moonwatcher
50%
50%
moonwatcher,
User Rank: Strategist
3/25/2014 | 3:12:38 PM
Re: up grading XP
Google the Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor program utility. It is still out there on MS web sites...Download it and run it. It will report what, if anything, will need to be upgraded in order to run Windows 7.
mklink923
50%
50%
mklink923,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/25/2014 | 3:56:11 PM
Re: up grading XP
Using the equivalent of slut-shaming to "encourage" people to move to a newer OS from XP is hardly worthy of a professional magazine, but then, professional behavior is getting harder to find anywhere.
mklink923
50%
50%
mklink923,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/25/2014 | 3:57:52 PM
Re: up grading XP
It is the processor that must support DEP, as it is the arbiter of whether one can move to Windows 8.x or not.
moonwatcher
50%
50%
moonwatcher,
User Rank: Strategist
3/25/2014 | 3:09:59 PM
Data Execution Prevention required for Windows 8?
Michael, please correct me if I'm wrong, but don't you need a motherboard that has a BIOS (or UEFI) that supports DEP (Data Execution Prevention) in order to be able to run Windows 8 or 8.1?

Is that is what is meant by "Secure boot requires firmware that supports UEFI v2.3.1 Errata B and has the Microsoft Windows Certification Authority in the UEFI signature database"?

In other words, CAN you even run Windows 8 without using Secure Boot on a motherboard that does not support DEP?

I've been under the impression THAT was the reason the most logical upgrade for XP folks was Windows 7, not 8.

Thanks,

 

Ross
Michael Endler
100%
0%
Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
3/25/2014 | 4:12:15 PM
Re: Data Execution Prevention required for Windows 8?
Thanks for the question, Ross. I asked Microsoft to clarify the specific details regarding motherboard compatibility, since I'm pretty sure replacing the motherboard can involve not only technical issues, but also licensing entanglements. I'll post their response once I receive it.

But you are correct that Windows 8 requires a motherboard that supports DEP. The article didn't dive into this level of detail, but this sort of difficulty is one of the reasons we said a lot of old XP systems simply won't support Windows 8.1. EDIT-- After digging around, it seems it would be more accurate to say Windows requires BIOS-level DEP support. I'm not sure what the implications are for all components, since BIOS is part of the motherboard generally but not exclusively. I'll update again when Microsoft sends me more specifics.

In fact, some older PCs lost motherboard compatibility between Windows 8 and Windows 8.1. Win 8.1 required motherboards with CMPXCHG16b support whereas Win 8 did not. So some people with old computers upgraded to Windows 8, found it horribly inappropriate for their non-touch PCs, and then were unable to access Windows 8.1's numerous mouse-and-keyboard improvements. Talk about a bummer.

The next update will reportedly shrink the OS's footprint and enable it to run on cheaper hardware. I think that probably has more to do with incenting OEMs to build new budget Windows 8.1 devices to compete with Chromebooks, but maybe Microsoft will also find a workaround for XP users who don't want to buy new machines. The update looks like it will hit right as Windows XP loses support.
moonwatcher
50%
50%
moonwatcher,
User Rank: Strategist
3/27/2014 | 2:10:36 PM
Re: Data Execution Prevention required for Windows 8?
Thank you for trying to get to the bottom of this issue. Knowing what will and what won't work for Windows 8.1 will give folks a clearer path to consider what to do come April 8th.  Like I've said before ad nausem: If they really wanted to help out as many XP people as possible, they would have offered Windows 7 for $39 up until April 8.
Michael Endler
50%
50%
Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
4/11/2014 | 6:05:15 PM
Re: Data Execution Prevention required for Windows 8?
So, it's not the categorical response we might have hoped for, but here's what Microsoft said on the issue:

"'NX' is the hardware feature that enforces Data Execution Protection, so in effect yes, Windows 8.1 computers require support for NX for hardware-assisted data execution protection. But there are additional requirements as described here."
TheKLF99
100%
0%
TheKLF99,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/25/2014 | 4:38:58 PM
Re: Data Execution Prevention required for Windows 8?
I've got quite an old desktop computer running Windows 8.  The motherboard is an old Gigabyte that doesn't support secure boot.

Windows 8 works fine with it, the only thing that doesn't work fine is my LG Blu-Ray writer, for some reason I've only been able to get that to work as an external USB drive ever since upgrading.  All my other DVD burners work fine though (most probably because it's an LG - Lifes Good for Lucky Goldstar!)
Michael Endler
100%
0%
Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
3/25/2014 | 5:03:41 PM
Re: Data Execution Prevention required for Windows 8?
Interesting. Thanks for sharing your experience. Microsoft hasn't sent over clarification about motherboard compatibility yet, but digging around online, it seems some people with older processors and motherboards were able to make Windows 8.1 work, whereas others had to upgrade components or abandon plans. Good to know there are more options for the older machines!
EJW
50%
50%
EJW,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/25/2014 | 3:52:41 PM
Zorin OS - A Windows XP replacement?
Another O/S that may be of interest is Zorin OS...

From their web site (http://zorin-os.com/index.html)

"Zorin OS is a multi-functional operating system designed specifically for Windows users who want to have easy and smooth access to Linux. It is based on Ubuntu which is the most popular desktop Linux operating system in the world."

It has a number of different desktops that look like various other O/S's...

"The Look Changer lets you change your desktop to look and act like either Windows 7, XP, Vista, Ubuntu Unity, Mac OS X or GNOME 2 for ultimate ease of use."

I looked at it briefly a while ago and it looked good, but I didn't use it regularly as I didn't need it at the time. I'll probably load up my old Xeon system with it after April 8th.

I've no affiliation with them, but I thought it may be of interest.

Best Regards,

                     Eric.

rradina
50%
50%
rradina,
User Rank: Ninja
3/25/2014 | 3:55:20 PM
Challenging Chrome Books on Price
Last week I was travelling and had some time to kill in Little Rock, AK.  I spent some time browsing a nearby Best Buy.  I was shocked that I could buy a Windows laptop for the same price as a Chrome Book.  Unless Microsoft has already started these incentives, it appears the cost difference is minimal or doesn't even exist.
Charlie Babcock
50%
50%
Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Author
3/25/2014 | 5:02:53 PM
Why no inde;pendent third party support?

Why doesn't someone start a third-party XP support business? It's well documented, and security patches follow known update procedures. Would such a thing be viable, outside Microsoft? 
rickyjha
50%
50%
rickyjha,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/26/2014 | 7:58:27 AM
Re: Why no inde;pendent third party support?
HI Charlie,

Well your idea for starting a XP support seems like a good business idea. Do you wnat to actually think and make a layouton this.

 

Best - ricky
MikeS048
100%
0%
MikeS048,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/26/2014 | 10:40:48 AM
Re: Why no inde;pendent third party support?
Isn't that what most SMB support firms do anyway. Most of our clients do not want to jump at the drop of Microsoft's hat no matter what. How many SMB companies are working just fine with XP and MS Word 2003 because there is nothing compelling in later releases. We have SMB companies with 20 to 30 employees that would not jump unless we the support companies " guarantee " no problems - and we wont.
Laurianne
50%
50%
Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
3/26/2014 | 3:08:27 PM
Re: Why no independent third party support?
Excellent question. Why no 3rd party support. Are companies afraid of being sued by Microsoft?
MikeS048
100%
0%
MikeS048,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/26/2014 | 3:45:03 PM
Re: Why no independent third party support?
What kind of support are people looking for? OS Support and at what level? Many of us who have been doing this for over 30 years can probably satisfy most levels of need. All it takes is thinking outside the currently popular box which most young people just cannot seem to do. Our company has many customers who after talking to the "geeks" and salespeople and "techs" out there come to one conclusion - that the younger set rationalize everything as - if it wasn't invented yesterday as an "app" ( what a word! ) its not current and not the way to solve a problem. Give us all a break! So what kind of support are you all looking for?

That's not to say that new technologies and innovations don't have their place. But plans have to be rational and appropriate to the customer's current and "slightly" future need. So what kind of support are you all looking for?
moarsauce123
0%
100%
moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
3/26/2014 | 7:59:28 AM
External hardware?
Aside from software that might not run on any other OS than XP there is a also plenty of external hardware that will not work with any of the suggested upgrade paths, maybe except for Linux. A common reason not to move away from XP is cost. I don't see where going the Mac, new Windows PC, or tablet route overcomes that problem. As far as cost goes, switching to Linux appears to be the best approach assuming that there is a suitable alternative for needed software.

I switched several XP systems over to Lubuntu. That flavor of Ubuntu uses less hardware resources and works fine on the older and still working hardware. The UI is different, but since Lubuntu does not use the dysfunctional Unity as window manager the switch is not that bad.
Indian-Art
50%
50%
Indian-Art,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/26/2014 | 9:40:17 AM
Great Options
There is a very good chance Linux OS will run well with older hardware with lower specs
Switch to the free, safe, secure & awesome OS: www.ubuntu.com/download
Its the worlds most popular free OS. It has free upgrades & security updates.

For those who like the Windows look, I would recommend: www.kubuntu.com & for older computer with lower specs www.xubuntu.com or http://lubuntu.net

Or try Linux Mint: http://linuxmint.com/
MikeS048
50%
50%
MikeS048,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/26/2014 | 10:43:53 AM
Re: Great Options
Oh - please. Nobody is going to retrain billions and billions ( thanks Carl Sagan ) of desktop people into Linux. Its a pipe dream. And I like Linux for myself. But lets get real.
Carney3
50%
50%
Carney3,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/26/2014 | 1:42:11 PM
Re: Great Options
"Oh - please. Nobody is going to retrain billions and billions ( thanks Carl Sagan ) of desktop people into Linux. Its a pipe dream. And I like Linux for myself. But lets get real."

 

Yes Ubuntu does have a user interface that would be unfamiliar to Windows XP users.

But there are plenty of Linux distros that have the more familiar look and feel, with the taskbar at bottom, clock at the lower right, Start button equivalent at the lower left, open top, menubars in the windows, and windows featuring close button with an X at their upper right. 

 

PCLinuxOS is a good example of a Linux distro that is made with Windows migrants and Linux newbies in mind, needing essentially no retraining for Windows users, and "just works" on the vast majority of hardware.  If you need professional tech support, Red Hat is out there too.
AndrewfOP
100%
0%
AndrewfOP,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/26/2014 | 11:47:00 AM
Upgrade from XP because of hardware? oh, please.
Let's stop pretending that one of the reasons to upgrade from Windows XP because the older PC is not as powerful as the tablets and smartphones that are everywhere today.  If the older PCs indeed have lest computing power than the devices today, we will be see docking stations for the tablets and smartphones.  Granted, the devices power by ARM architecture are far more energy effecient than PCs or any other computing device that requires external power source, yet bit by bit, computation by computation, tablets and smartphones are NOT more powerful than most existing PCs.  They just seem so because of the bloated windows and the applications that run on the OS.

Quite frankly, as someone who works in IT supoort on the side and emphathizes with the average users, as long as you know what the risks about computer security are, and don't do much banking or bill paying online, you DON'T ever need to upgrade until the computer doesn't run anymore.  By then, you can get a device with maybe a decent Windows next time, or you can always go to the library and have someone else do the worrying for you.
AgentG
100%
0%
AgentG,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/26/2014 | 3:32:26 PM
Microsoft's fails again
There are a number of relevant issues not mentioned here.  For one, upgrading an XP system also will require upgrading all the software, which can easily outweigh the costs of new hardware, if even at all possible.  So, the generic options in this column of all possible upgrade paths are not really anything but a market survey presented as advice.  Also, many vendors chose to discontinue driver support after XP for printers, scanners, etc. so that would also have to be replaced.  These are all tangible costs and wasted time versus *potential* security risks that no one can predict.

Also, having just installed two new XP machines in the last 6 months, I can say with certainty that the performance of XP on any given machine is much better than Win7 or Win8.  It is much faster, more responsive and works great, even with the 4GB limitation of 32-bit memory addressing, because it is a simpler and slender OS.  XP was a major technological achievement after Windows 95 and 2000 and represented the best and most modern OS architecture ever developed.

What is truly amazing is that the IT industry and its pundits have a terrible record at predicting calamities (Y2K !) and not predicting real threats (malware) and generally seem to be unaware of what many users actually experience and are faced with.  This comes from the 'orifice' arrangement as noted by Steve Jobs where most IT products are purchased by someone for use by someone else, so that the industry perceives a distinction between users and customers.  Thus, many 'customers' don't give a crap about user problems, convenience, or wasted time, which feeds back to terrible products produced by the IT industry.  Win8 really comes to mind here, as well as so many other products/platforms that are more about strategic market share of vendors than actual user functionality.  Perhaps the best evidence for this is the 30% market share of XP to this day, which does not scream that the OS needs to be replaced, but that this OS is doing its job very well.  What companies like Microsoft are truly blind to is the great service these older machines are still providing on a daily basis, which does not seem to get recognized or used as a positive marketing tool for Microsoft, though it is the most powerful and compelling economic argument to use MS products.  This is the blindness at MS that has prevented development of products that XP users would have migrated to, so I see it as an abject marketing failure by MS that the adoption rates for Win7 and Win8 are so low in the product lifetime cycle compared to XP.
jgood920
50%
50%
jgood920,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/27/2014 | 5:12:46 PM
Re: Microsoft's fails again
Maybe Agent G should have written or contributed to the article.

He brings salient points that should have been covered, especially the obsolescence of existing periferals. I have to maintain an older machine to host my tape backup archive. No, I no longer use it for archiving, but I am not throwing away my history and archived data. It is far too large to migrate to another solution.

It is time to condemn Microsoft for their CRIMES.

First off the word "support" and "update" are generally misused with this company. GM has to call it a "recall" when defects and manufacturing mistakes are sold to the public. Microsoft never sells anything that doesn'y need "fixes" and "patches". In the sales experience it is never admitted that they are selling you a horribly FLAWED PRODUCT; they emphasize that they support their customers. I think it is about time for Congress to enact a law that for the RIGHT to hold a Copyright on software, a company MUST support thet software for the life of the company that owns it.

Microsoft is famous for buying out developers and bundling applications within their operating systems.i.e. Movie Maker, Migration Tool, Microsoft Works, etc. They have NEVER built Anti-Virus into any Operating System, even though it became apparent with the original Windows in the 80s. It must be inferred that Microsoft wants "planned obsolescence" as an integral part of it's business strategy. All that money you must spend to haul away and dispose of monitors, computers, and electronic waste is greatly the fault of Microsoft's business strategy. They get rich - their customers get poorer.

With Windows 8, it is a perfect time to take a stand and say, "NO MORE"! Microsoft have had their chance and blown it enough times. Until Congress passes the Software Responsibilty Law, refuse to buy any new Microsoft product.
PaulS681
50%
50%
PaulS681,
User Rank: Ninja
3/31/2014 | 7:54:27 PM
Re: Microsoft's fails again
I can see MS thinking. They cant support every OS forever. They have ended support for Win98, ME, 2000, NT ....

Why is everyone so surprised they are doing it for XP???

All software manfactures do it. You can't support every version of software you put out.
Yoavraz
50%
50%
Yoavraz,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/26/2014 | 9:32:51 PM
Norton 360 - a possible solution for continuing with no upgrade?
I have been using for almost a year Norton 360 after a sever virus infection on my Win machines: Two XP Prof (Pentium 4, one from 2002 which started with 0.25G memory; failed HD replacement years ago under warranty) and two Win 7 (all with memory upgrades to 2G) running standard home apps including video streaming for TVs, being used as main machines at home. Since I statrted with 360 my machines perform smoothly and effectively at a very reasonable speed and look healthy as never before. I hope (and see no reason why not) that Symantec continue to support. The old Wins look stable, and I see no reason to upgrade as long as the HW is functioning...
Yoavraz
50%
50%
Yoavraz,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/30/2014 | 9:42:54 PM
Re: Norton 360 - a possible solution for continuing with no upgrade?
A friend has just told me that an hour after installing Norton 360 on his Win 7 lap that almost came to halt (infected?), it started to operate like new.
PaulS681
50%
50%
PaulS681,
User Rank: Ninja
3/31/2014 | 7:51:02 PM
Re: Norton 360 - a possible solution for continuing with no upgrade?
The issue with using XP means that when security holes are expoited by hackers MS will not be fixing them. Norton 360 will not detect everything and I'm sure they will not support an unsupported OS for very long.
Yoavraz
50%
50%
Yoavraz,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/31/2014 | 8:31:16 PM
Re: Norton 360 - a possible solution for continuing with no upgrade?
To PaulS681:

If Win XP does not change, adding the identified (anyhow for other Wins) new threats fixes to the XP protecting version does not look to me too expensive for Symantec (I suspect new threat authors will not bother to attack only the discontinued XP). Especially that Symantec still have a substantial customer base who paid them for protecting XP, which will not vanish immediately...

I'm hopeful...
PaulS681
50%
50%
PaulS681,
User Rank: Ninja
3/31/2014 | 9:35:41 PM
Re: Norton 360 - a possible solution for continuing with no upgrade?
I see where you are coming from. But Norton can't plug security holes in XP. I would bet that hackers already know about some holes and are just waiting for the deadline to act on them.
J_Brandt
50%
50%
J_Brandt,
User Rank: Ninja
3/28/2014 | 2:09:44 PM
Reality - More Limited Options
I'm working with several organizations on their XP issue and while I am aware of multiple options, I couldn't come up with 9.  "9" options is a rather bogus title.  You only have all those options to you if the Windows software you currently run is unimportant to you, or the vendor happens to have cross platform support. Chromebooks, iPads, Macs, Androids and Linux aren't options for most small businesses looking to keep their investment and upgrade. 
PaulS681
50%
50%
PaulS681,
User Rank: Ninja
3/31/2014 | 7:48:27 PM
Risk
Xp is going to be a HUGE target for hackers. If you have XP machines on your network you are taking a big risk. One option, though not a solution, might be to use XP mode for legacy applications. You can get upgraded to Windows 7 but still have XP for legacy apps. It may just buy you some time to get that app updated.
Joe Stanganelli
100%
0%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
3/31/2014 | 11:17:43 PM
Re: Risk
Is it too late to downgrade to MS-DOS 5.0?
jgherbert
50%
50%
jgherbert,
User Rank: Ninja
3/31/2014 | 10:22:25 PM
Common Usage
I've been pretty staggered by quite how many XP systems are still in use out there. It seems like it's the OS that won't die.

I have to assume that the systems in use are just unable to run Windows 7, because Win 7 (unlike Vista) is in my opinion a good upgrade from XP. Or maybe it's cost - that has been something that has turned me off in the past as well. That said, I only have one XP laptop left and I really don't use it any more, and thank goodness.

 
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
3/31/2014 | 11:22:33 PM
Re: Common Usage
My opinion/experience: The consumer tech market secretly drives the enterprise tech market -- at least when it comes to upgrading and adopting new technology.  Execs and their families get the toys at home, then want to adopt them in the enterprise from there.  (iPhone, anyone?)

A great example was Windows 95/98.  What helped drive adoption in business was the fact that many game developers (and other software developers) started developing exclusively for Win 95+ -- with no backwards compatibility.

In the consumer market, however, there has been very little compelling reason to upgrade from XP to 7 unless you're particularly conscious about security (and, let's face it, most consumers aren't).  We are seeing the result of that apathy in the enterprise.
PaulS681
50%
50%
PaulS681,
User Rank: Ninja
4/1/2014 | 12:43:42 AM
Re: Common Usage
I can see cost being an issue to upgrade and running legacy apps as well. But if cost is not an issue and you dont run any old apps I don't see the problem. Windows 7 is a much improved OS. I don't understand why some want to stick with XP.
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
4/1/2014 | 9:57:07 PM
Re: Common Usage
One thing that I REALLY like in XP more than in 7.  If you have multiple tabs or documents open in the same program, and minimize them or hide them, when you click on the icon, you are forced to switch the particular tab/document you want right then and there.

In XP, it simply took you back immediately to whatever document or tab you had most recently worked with/opened.  This was FAR more efficient and far less time consuming.

So boo on Windows 7 for that.  Mleh.
Michael Endler
50%
50%
Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
4/11/2014 | 6:11:01 PM
Re: Common Usage
That was a personal pet peeve for me, too. It might sound like a small change, but I really didn't like it the first time I used Windows 7. Eventually, though, I got used to it and found ways to make it work for me.
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
4/24/2014 | 10:00:46 AM
Re: Common Usage
@Michael: One thing I've noticed is that Firefox doesn't have this problem in Windows 7.  Yet another reason to not use IE, I guess.  (At least, in Windows 7.)
Michael Endler
50%
50%
Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
4/11/2014 | 6:08:21 PM
No love for Mac or Chrome among the XP loyalists?
It's interesting that in all these comments, there's been talk about upgrading an old XP PC to Windows 7, Windows 8.1, or even Linux-- but pretty much no one who's advocating Macs, Chromebooks, or tablets.

Google's been baiting XP users for months-- anyone out there move from Windows XP to a Chromebook? Anyone decide that OS X was a better upgrade option than Windows 8.1?
pjdxxxwa
50%
50%
pjdxxxwa,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/28/2014 | 3:03:15 PM
The BEST option

Your best option to replace XP -  if you are worried about security or viruses (and being expensive forced to buy anti-viruses internet security software yearly), and a company trying to bully you even couple years to upgrade their software, or a computer that does not last is to buy a MAC.

Bought my Mac Pro desktop in 2006.  The only think I ever needed was to add more memory and that is only because of all the bells and whistles that all these interet sites think they need. Sure,  I needed to get MS WORD for Mac (only because I am used to it), but it comes with its own Office suite of Safari, Numbers (think Excel)  and Keynote.  And many of the MAC software is Free on the Internet if you want more,  because Apple users believe in shareware.  

With MS trying desperately to make a Mac-like computer (and failing big time) I am so glad I did choose to switch. In the long-term its less money going out, less worry about viruses, and far more reliable. Something    to think about.



The Business of Going Digital
The Business of Going Digital
Digital business isn't about changing code; it's about changing what legacy sales, distribution, customer service, and product groups do in the new digital age. It's about bringing big data analytics, mobile, social, marketing automation, cloud computing, and the app economy together to launch new products and services. We're seeing new titles in this digital revolution, new responsibilities, new business models, and major shifts in technology spending.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Tech Digest - August 20, 2014
CIOs need people who know the ins and outs of cloud software stacks and security, and, most of all, can break through cultural resistance.
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.