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Startup Aims To Unlock Family Medical History
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Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
3/26/2014 | 3:21:23 PM
Interesting food for thought
Really intriguing issues, David. Would have to be a heck of a privacy agreement. What happens when the company gets acquired? 
David F. Carr
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David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
3/27/2014 | 10:11:06 AM
Re: Interesting food for thought
This really got me thinking about whether healthcare privacy is too much of a sacred cow. Jeff Jarvis has a book called Public Parts, on the value of sharing vs. privacy, that I'd like to go back and read in the context of healthcare IT (I remember it's something he discussed in the context of his own illnesses).

The question of what happens when the company goes belly up applies to any cloud service, including the cloud EHRs, and can only be determined by law and regulation. I don't think we have a lack of regulation to protect the patient (although how it works in practice is not always consistent). The question here is whether we've protected ourselves in a way that makes it difficult to achieve certain benefits. The easiest work around, without changing the law, is to put the individual/consumer/patient in charge of deciding what to share. One of the big questions about that as a business plan is whether people will be motivated to do so.

BTW, I downloaded the Zibdy app but didn't get very far with it because (I'm glad to say) I'm not on any medications at the moment and didn't have much to record there. Getting my parents into the system could be interesting, but they don't even have an Internet connection or a smart phone.
asksqn
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asksqn,
User Rank: Ninja
3/27/2014 | 2:50:07 PM
A breach waiting to happen
Wow, talk about a massive breach waiting to happen.  Printing out health info and handing it to a family member  is one thing, but the creation of apps for the purpose brings all kinds of security breaches into the mix, particularly since (1) the average person has no clue as to security; (2) the great majority of apps (unless the user is tech savvy and isn't using Android) allow an app to phone home to the mother ship without notice or permission to the user.  Nothing good can come from the wholesale sharing of health info despite the best intentions of the individual who stands to make millions from it.
David F. Carr
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David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
3/27/2014 | 3:12:39 PM
Re: A breach waiting to happen
Whether he stands to make millions is still open to question, at this point. But I'm not sure I'd characterize the approach as "wholesale sharing of health data" -- it's sharing of data between people who choose to share their data. Convincing consumers that this is a good idea would be the first major challenge.
social-biz.org
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social-biz.org,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/4/2014 | 5:17:24 AM
Re: A breach waiting to happen
I did a survey of similar tools, including some that allowed you to assign tasks and help coordinate family members care at:

Zibdy is new to me, however I am sure there will be many more of these before the market shakes out years from now.


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