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SOPA: 5 Key Provisions Of Anti-Piracy Bill
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GDROPPED000
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GDROPPED000,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/25/2011 | 5:26:27 PM
re: SOPA: 5 Key Provisions Of Anti-Piracy Bill
Why do you think Google does not like SOPA?
jobardu
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jobardu,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/18/2011 | 2:05:40 PM
re: SOPA: 5 Key Provisions Of Anti-Piracy Bill
The last such law, I think it was the DMCA, passed in the Clinton administration, had the same justification. The official who herded the bill through eventually renounced it saying that it didn't serve the purpose and was used precisely to protect outdated and dysfunctional business models and practices. The last time it was US companies were able to fill the digital music gap. This time, the more global and comprehensive nature of the law will end up leaving the field to foreign companies and cost the economy billions, if not trillions. It will encourage protectionism in foreign countries by giving them an excuse to "protect" their people from US corporate whatevers.

The worst part of the bill is the failure to demand a quid pro quo from the corporate beneficiaries of the law. For example, drug companies should not be allowed to charge US consumers a price multiple for the same drug that they sell in other developed companies. There need to be provisions for competitiveness and new technology. One person's pirate is another persons competitor. SOPA is store bought legislation that benefits a very limited subset of the population and could likely hurt the economy. We need to protect IP as a precious national resource, it's just that SOPA isn't the way to do it.
danm50
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danm50,
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11/18/2011 | 1:49:09 PM
re: SOPA: 5 Key Provisions Of Anti-Piracy Bill
If the court must consider the same level of evidence that it would have to do if financial compensation were being requested by the plaintiff and if the site is given the opportunity to cease and desist the judged offending offering before any blocking would go into effect this might be reasonable; however, if a simple complaint leads to an injunction blocking the site until a full judgement can be made (which is of, course, possibly "never") you can be sure that companies would abuse this power to a very large and detrimental degree.

Blocking access to a website should be no easier than shutting down a magazine or a newspaper for claims of plagiarism or false advertising or offering illegal access to goods or services.
YMOM100
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YMOM100,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/18/2011 | 4:36:56 AM
re: SOPA: 5 Key Provisions Of Anti-Piracy Bill
It will do absolutely nothing to stop piracy. All this will do is block sites on the domain level (the whole "www.blahblahblah.blah" part). If you know the IP address of a site (the whole "198.1.1.1" thing), there is no blocking that.

Write to your member of congress today to put a stop to this.


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