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Android Vs. iOS Vs. Windows Phone 7: Enterprise Shootout
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FritzNelson
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FritzNelson,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/29/2011 | 4:30:10 AM
re: Android Vs. iOS Vs. Windows Phone 7: Enterprise Shootout
Fun stuff. Now I want to get the phones back! I did try voice commands using WP7 -- there's a built in capability. But it wasn't very accurate. I probably tend to under enunciate, however.
FritzNelson
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FritzNelson,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/29/2011 | 4:28:57 AM
re: Android Vs. iOS Vs. Windows Phone 7: Enterprise Shootout
Good point on Office Mobile. I had that in my notes but completely forgot to add that to the article. I'm also sure that Microsoft will expand some of those capabilities over time.
FritzNelson
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FritzNelson,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/29/2011 | 4:27:50 AM
re: Android Vs. iOS Vs. Windows Phone 7: Enterprise Shootout
I absolutely agree. I've pointed this out numerous times in other articles I've written. I am curious, however, whether people really use all of those features & policies -- do they use 20%? 50%? How many do you need? I'm sure for govt & large business, this is very much required, however. The problem is what to do about all of your end users who bring in other devices and demand they be supported. A "BlackBerry Only" approach is probably not going to last too long.
FritzNelson
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FritzNelson,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/29/2011 | 4:25:26 AM
re: Android Vs. iOS Vs. Windows Phone 7: Enterprise Shootout
Thank you for this. Microsoft didn't exactly make this easy for me, and what I did find online (in terms of making a universal inbox) took some doing, nor was your explanation included. So I appreciate that this can happen as you say (I sent my phones back, so I can't try it) and hopefully others will find it useful as well. This is precisely why I invited everyone to comment. I knew I wouldn't find everything.
Walt French
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Walt French,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/29/2011 | 4:07:40 AM
re: Android Vs. iOS Vs. Windows Phone 7: Enterprise Shootout
GǣDespite all of these procedures (or lack thereof,) all three companies have had malware distributed through the app stores.Gǥ

Yes, and fatal accidents happen to both Volvo drivers and Apollo astronauts. That doesn't mean that the challenges of staying safe are remotely of the same order of magnitude.

It was just two years ago that iPhones were deemed GǣunsuitableGǥ for Enterprise use due to lack of remote wipe, etc. Now that the platform has it (and a certain OTHER one doesn't), we see long-term observers like Tim Bajarian say that IT people tell him Androids are not acceptable.

This is really striking that Google's wide-open, inherently insecure system (with all GǣsecurityGǥ being closing the barn doors after the cows are out), is equated to Apple's system that has multiple security mechanisms that sometimes still don't catch malware.

Perhaps the reviewer is not involved in security in an Enterprise that is terribly conscious of it, as the firm where I work is? How does this casual dismissal of disproportionate insecurity mechanisms seems incredibly casual.
YMOM100
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YMOM100,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/29/2011 | 4:00:16 AM
re: Android Vs. iOS Vs. Windows Phone 7: Enterprise Shootout
Android will win, of course. Questions?
Steve Hillshire
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Steve Hillshire,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/29/2011 | 12:52:31 AM
re: Android Vs. iOS Vs. Windows Phone 7: Enterprise Shootout
Facetime is *not* a compelling reason to buy an iPhone. Who wants video chatting that is limited to one platform. Unless all your friends own Macs and iPhones (both minority platforms mind you), only a misinformed consumer would call Facetime compelling. Tango for instance is cross platform even with Windows Phone 7 and works quite well.
kroyalty410
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kroyalty410,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/28/2011 | 9:57:48 PM
re: Android Vs. iOS Vs. Windows Phone 7: Enterprise Shootout
dang i forgot to mention - the "eyeball" in bing can also natively read QR Codes as well as "Microsoft Tags".
find someone that has a QR code of their business card and scan it. you'll get the immediate option if you tap on the info to save it to "outlook" or "windows live". if you save to outlook, you've just put them in your address book in exchange. I recently went to a conference where everyone had nametags that had their business card as a QR Code under their name. i was able to collect "Cards" via my phone and didn't have to enter even one business card at all manually.
kroyalty410
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kroyalty410,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/28/2011 | 9:54:45 PM
re: Android Vs. iOS Vs. Windows Phone 7: Enterprise Shootout
Great article and as close to non-bias as i've seen to date.
i'll not repeat what someone else said about the WP7 linked inboxes.
i will mention that there are other voice options built-into WP7 than you may not have discovered.

here are some examples. 1st, connect a bluetooth headset/device
hit the button on your headset/device - the phone will ask you for voice commands.
try "call john smith moble"
now try again and say "text john smith" - it will let you dictate a SMS/TXT message and read it back for your approval before sending. now wait for a reply - it will let you hands-free listen to the message and give you the option to reply. you never touch the phone. in fact, it's faster and uses less battery if you do this. the phone stays dark :)

if you bring up the "Bing" app (hit the magnifying glass button on the phone) you can then hit the microphone icon and it will function just like Shazam (which is also available) but links to your Zune feature of the phone.

try this cool feature - bring up "Bing" again. hit the "eyeball" icon. point the camera to any text (a sign, a document, etc) and it will OCR it and let you translate it from english to any other language. this is great for when you travel! i've not tried it outside the USA yet on non-english to english translation, but i'm eager to test it.

3rd cool feature also in "Bing" is the little "houses" icon. that is "local scout" and shows you either via GPS if you are outside, or cell tower triangulation if you are indoors, all the local "Stuff" you can see/do near your location.
all the "bing" stuff is in all windows phone 7.5 (mango) from all carriers. i've removed some apps as this works so well for me i don't need the other apps.

of note - Delta Airlines is the only major airline that has an app for ALL phone platforms. i've done a side-by-side comparison of the Delta app for iOS and WP7 and the WP7 app has features not in the iOS version. you should try that yourself. You have to have a flight booked to see some of the stuff btw - you may need to find someone that will let you log into their skymiles account that has some recent or upcoming flights to see what i mean.
Kevin
humdinger
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humdinger,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/28/2011 | 3:35:14 PM
re: Android Vs. iOS Vs. Windows Phone 7: Enterprise Shootout
This isn't really an enterprise overview of the system, it is more of an overview of how an enterprise user used each of the mobile systems personally. Like the commenter before me mentioned, the hooks provided by each mobile system for IT management are minimal and nothing compared to what BB provides. That said, it doesn't appear that this is a huge priority for users going into the future.

You also mentioned that WP7 does not have Google Docs but failed to mention that Office Mobile is available for free on the platform, which is certainly a better and more enterprisey solution than the thin web-apps that Google provides. With Office on WP7, I have access to well-featured editions of Excel and Word on the phone and when I go onto SkyDrive from a Desktop, I can launch the full desktop edition and continue working on the documents/spreadsheets and have it sync back to the phone.

All that said, this was probably the most neutral overview of all systems that I've read.
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