Business & Finance
News
3/14/2007
12:11 PM
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%
Repost This

Microsoft Takes Aim At Cybersquatters

The company is stepping up efforts against those who illegally profit from Microsoft trademarks by registering domains with slightly altered spellings.

Cybersquatters beware -- Microsoft is coming after you.

The software maker said Tuesday that it will more aggressively pursue legal action against companies that create domain names that are misspellings of Microsoft product names in order to capture Internet traffic from typo-prone computer users.

To emphasize the point, Microsoft announced that it has filed a lawsuit against a U.S.-based cybersquatter that operates under the name Maltuzi LLC. Microsoft claims the company illegally profits from its trademarks by registering domains such Winowslivemessenger.com (note the lack of the letter D) in order to redirect wayward Web surfers to sites operated by its partners.

Maltuzi, which Microsoft has sued in U.S. District Court for Northern California, describes itself as "an Internet domain name holding company" and claims it has registered more than 100,000 domain names.

Microsoft also announced that it has filed a lawsuit in the state of Washington to uncover the identities of a group of cybersquatters that are anonymously operating Web sites under names that allegedly infringe on Microsoft trademarks.

Microsoft also said it has reached a settlement with U.K.-based cybersquatter Dyslexic Domain Co. Ltd.

In 1999, Congress passed the U.S. Anti-Cybersquatting Consumer Protection Act, which makes it illegal to register domain names that infringe on the trademark rights of individuals or corporations.

Despite such laws, cybersquatting continues to flourish. The U.N.'s World Intellectual Property Organization says that disputes related to domain name registration increased 25% in 2006.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
The Agile Archive
The Agile Archive
When it comes to managing data, donít look at backup and archiving systems as burdens and cost centers. A well-designed archive can enhance data protection and restores, ease search and e-discovery efforts, and save money by intelligently moving data from expensive primary storage systems.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Elite 100 - 2014
Our InformationWeek Elite 100 issue -- our 26th ranking of technology innovators -- shines a spotlight on businesses that are succeeding because of their digital strategies. We take a close at look at the top five companies in this year's ranking and the eight winners of our Business Innovation awards, and offer 20 great ideas that you can use in your company. We also provide a ranked list of our Elite 100 innovators.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Audio Interviews
Archived Audio Interviews
GE is a leader in combining connected devices and advanced analytics in pursuit of practical goals like less downtime, lower operating costs, and higher throughput. At GIO Power & Water, CIO Jim Fowler is part of the team exploring how to apply these techniques to some of the world's essential infrastructure, from power plants to water treatment systems. Join us, and bring your questions, as we talk about what's ahead.