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Microsoft Will Stumble On Windows Vista And Office 2007

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In This Issue:
1. Editor's Note: Microsoft Will Stumble On Windows Vista And Office 2007
2. Today's Top Story
    - Microsoft Unveils 'Non-Security' Update For IE
3. Breaking News
    - Intel To Use New Micro-Architecture In 2006
    - IT Group Urges Moratorium In BlackBerry Shutdown
    - Auction Site To Offer Prerelease PlayStation 3 Consoles
    - 'Lily Pad' Hot-Spots Cover Cincinnati With Free Wi-Fi
    - Dell Ships Second Pair Of Duo Notebooks
    - SEC Shuts Down $50 Million Autosurf Ponzi Scam
    - RFID Conference Showcases Asset Tracking
    - Diverse Coalition Battles AOL's Pay-To-Send E-Mail System
    - Q&A: Hewlett-Packard's Linux Chief
    - First Cell-Phone Java Trojan On The Loose
    - Verizon Offers Server-Management Service
    - Israel: Intel Expands, Google Lands
    - Myth And Reality At RFID Show
    - One Retailer's Path To Strong Online Sales
4. Grab Bag
    - Mysterious Origami By Microsoft To Take On iPod (USA Today)
    - Google News Goes Mobile (PCWorld)
    - Want To Read E-Mail With Your Feet? Microsoft Is Working On It (Seattle Post-Intelligencer)
5. In Depth
    - Microsoft Says Search Better Than Google Soon
    - Microsoft Seeks Search-Engine Trademark
    - Microsoft MSN Adds Street-Side Views To Local Maps
    - Search Engines Are At The Center Of Privacy Debate
    - Napster Rues Microsoft, Player Glitches
    - Microsoft Hands Out Free Flash Drives
6. Voice Of Authority
    - Google Porn Search On Cell Phones
7. White Papers
    - High-Level Best Practices In Software Configuration Management
8. Get More Out Of InformationWeek
9. Manage Your Newsletter Subscription

Quote of the day:
"If you asked me to name the three scariest threats facing the human race, I would give the same answer that most people would: nuclear war, global warming, and Windows." -- Dave Barry


1. Editor's Note: Microsoft Will Stumble On Windows Vista And Office 2007

The thing about the story of the boy who cried wolf is that the wolf eventually showed up.

Every time Microsoft updates Windows and Office, pessimists say customers won't adopt the new version. This trend goes back more than a decade. It happened with Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows ME, and Windows XP. And the pessimists have been wrong every time.

But this time around, it's looking like the pessimistic view is the right one. Neither Vista nor the upcoming Office 2007 offers compelling reasons to upgrade.

Certainly Vista offers many improvements over Windows XP--things that make you look forward to getting your hands on it. I discussed this issue with my colleague Scot Finnie, and he pointed out a few right off the top of his head: The new user interface is much more attractive and easier to use than the existing user interface. The performance is better, making the user experience much more pleasant--you no longer feel like you're dealing with bloated, sluggish software, as you sometimes do with Windows XP. Shutdown and startup time will be much faster for most users.

Vista also includes some intriguing technology for indexing information, making it easier to organize and search for documents.

Microsoft Internet Explorer 7 is much better than IE6. It includes tabs, a feature missing from IE6 that's been standard in alternative browsers like Firefox and Opera for years.

All those things sound pretty good. But they don't make you want to rush out and buy a new PC right away, or, if you're an IT manager, make room in your 2006-07 budgets for upgrades to your PCs. You're probably thinking--as I am--that you'll upgrade to Vista whenever you get around to upgrading your hardware.

To read more about why users will be reluctant to upgrade to Vista and Office 12, visit the InformationWeek Weblog. And leave a comment while you're there. We'd like to hear if you plan to rush to upgrade to Windows Vista, or if you'd rather take your time.

Mitch Wagner
mwagner@cmp.com
www.informationweek.com


2. Today's Top Story

Microsoft Unveils 'Non-Security' Update For IE
With the update in place, Internet Explorer 6 won't run some ActiveX controls until they've been explicitly enabled by the user.


3. Breaking News

Intel To Use New Micro-Architecture In 2006
The 64-bit microprocessor at the heart of the new architecture is code-named Merom and will be implemented in desktop computers, laptops, and servers beginning in the second half of this year.

IT Group Urges Moratorium In BlackBerry Shutdown
The Society of Information Management is trying to buy its members more time to test the Blackberry workaround and to try out alternatives in case the service is shut down.

Auction Site To Offer Prerelease PlayStation 3 Consoles
UniqueAuction.com in mid-March plans to auction off 10 Sony PlayStation 3 game consoles, company officials told TechWeb.

'Lily Pad' Hot-Spots Cover Cincinnati With Free Wi-Fi
More than 20 "pods," each with numerous hot-spots and still more access points, are already up and running. At least 55 more are slated to be online in the coming weeks.

Dell Ships Second Pair Of Duo Notebooks
Dell on Tuesday posted another pair of Core Duo-powered notebooks to its sales site, the third and fourth models from the Texas manufacturer to feature Intel's newest dual-core chip.

SEC Shuts Down $50 Million Autosurf Ponzi Scam
The Securities and Exchange Commission has filed fraud charges against the owner of an Autosurf site, who it accused of running a $50 million Ponzi scam and pocketing nearly $2 million.

RFID Conference Showcases Asset Tracking
"Smart shelves," the next generation of RFID tags, and asset tracking are among the wares attendees will see at this week's RFID World event in Dallas.

Diverse Coalition Battles AOL's Pay-To-Send E-Mail System
Nonprofit organizations and other groups launch a campaign to pressure America Online Inc. into halting plans for a pay-to-send E-mail system.

Q&A: Hewlett-Packard's Linux Chief
Christine Martino, VP of Hewlett Packard's Open Source and Linux organization, talks about middleware, Linux on the desktop, and other open-source trends.

First Cell-Phone Java Trojan On The Loose
The exploit can attack any smart phone, PDA, or cell phone that runs Java 2 Micro Edition, Sun Microsystems' version for consumer electronics devices.

Verizon Offers Server-Management Service
IT customers in multivendor shops can use the service in a variety of ways--from their own locations, in third-party locations, or from one of Verizon's more than 100 data centers.

Israel: Intel Expands, Google Lands
The Google Israel R&D center will be the first of its kind in the Middle East.

Myth And Reality At RFID Show
Panelists with a wealth of RFID experience talked about what works and what doesn't when implementing the technology. Among their advice: Reduce the cost by finding multiple opportunities to use RFID.

One Retailer's Path To Strong Online Sales
Campmor Sporting Goods, which began selling its gear online in 1995, generated 72% of its revenue from the Web last year, up from 6% in 1997

All our latest news

Watch The News Show

John Soat With 'News With A Bang'
Google's share of search grows but shares of stock tumble, Oracle offers critical patch, Apple introduces new products, and more.

Laurie Sullivan With 'RFID World'
Report from RFID World in Dallas. Highlights include Korea's big push into the RFID market.

Ivan Schneider With 'Horsepower TV'
A look at the first fuel-injection CPU.


----- The latest research, polls, and tools -----

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-----------------------------------------


4. Grab Bag: News You Need From Around The Web

Mysterious Origami By Microsoft To Take On iPod (USA Today)
Tech industry analysts expect Microsoft to announce design details today for a new device for on-the-go computing, code-named Origami.

Google News Goes Mobile (PCWorld)
In a further push into the mobile space, Google has optimized Google News for mobile phone users. When Internet-enabled phone users visit Google.com, they'll now see a news link that points to a page listing news headlines. Users can search for news stories from a variety of sources and browse based on subject.

Want To Read E-Mail With Your Feet? Microsoft Is Working On It (Seattle Post-Intelligencer)
Sorting through a barrage of E-mail is no cakewalk--but maybe it could be a tap dance. Brian Meyers, a Microsoft research developer, steps on colored squares to delete E-mail from his mailbox during a demonstration in Redmond, Wash., on Tuesday. Researchers from the company showed a prototype software program that lets people use a floor pad from the popular "Dance, Dance Revolution" game to sort E-mails and digital photos by stomping and moving their feet.


5. In Depth

Microsoft Says Search Better Than Google Soon
Within the next six months, according to a Microsoft executive, the company will introduce a search engine that can do a better job of finding the specific information sought by users.

Microsoft Seeks Search-Engine Trademark
A Microsoft application filed with the U.S. Patent Office seeks to trademark the term "relerank" in reference to software for organizing, displaying, and managing search results.

Microsoft MSN Adds Street-Side Views To Local Maps
The latest feature presents a view similar to what a person would see from a car, according to the company.

Search Engines Are At The Center Of Privacy Debate
The more user information gathered by Google, Yahoo, and Microsoft MSN, the more often they will become the targets of governments.

Napster Rues Microsoft, Player Glitches
Napster chairman Chris Gorog, whose company has one of the best-known names in the business but has failed to put a dent in Apple's 80% online-music market share, argues that eventually the "Microsoft ecosystem" and its Windows Media format will prevail.

Microsoft Hands Out Free Flash Drives
The "Mystery Solved" site is an attempt to educate users about the intricacies of Microsoft's sometimes-confusing licensing policies.


6. Voice Of Authority

Google Porn Search On Cell Phones
Andy Dornan says: Google gave two computer scientists access to more than a million of its mobile search records in research aimed at understanding the unique needs of wireless Web surfers. Judging by the results, what users really need is a porn portal, as more searches were for smut than anything else.


7. White Papers

High-Level Best Practices In Software Configuration Management
As providers of software configuration management tools and consultants to software companies, we are often asked for sound advice on SCM best practices. In answering these requests, we have a bounty of direct and indirect experience from which to draw. Direct experience coming from having been developers and code-line managers ourselves.


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