News
News
3/13/2006
10:10 AM
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%
Repost This

Microsoft's Unveils Its Origami Ultra Mobile PC

But the new Tablet PC running Windows XP is less than revolutionary.

The most interesting thing about Microsoft's Origami is what it turned out not to be. Far from the Transformer gadget hinted at by bloggers and journalists (it changes from iPod to camcorder to computer and back!), the device is just a slightly smaller Tablet PC. Officially unveiled last week, Origami is in a category of devices called Ultra Mobile PCs, which Bill Gates first talked about at WinHEC in April.

The first product is a 7-inch tablet built by Samsung. Like other tablets, it's a full PC with a hard drive and Windows XP. Earlier last week, Intel let attendees at its Developer Forum play with prototypes of even smaller Ultra Mobile PCs. But most didn't recognize them as Origami, because the idea isn't new or revolutionary.

In a post on the Origami blog March 9, one of the project's leaders admitted: "In truth, this category has existed for some time." Microsoft's only original contribution is the Touch Pack software, which simplifies the Windows XP user interface so the touchscreen can be operated with fingers and thumbs, not a stylus. For this we got our blood pressure up?

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
The Agile Archive
The Agile Archive
When it comes to managing data, donít look at backup and archiving systems as burdens and cost centers. A well-designed archive can enhance data protection and restores, ease search and e-discovery efforts, and save money by intelligently moving data from expensive primary storage systems.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Government, May 2014
NIST's cyber-security framework gives critical-infrastructure operators a new tool to assess readiness. But will operators put this voluntary framework to work?
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Audio Interviews
Archived Audio Interviews
GE is a leader in combining connected devices and advanced analytics in pursuit of practical goals like less downtime, lower operating costs, and higher throughput. At GIO Power & Water, CIO Jim Fowler is part of the team exploring how to apply these techniques to some of the world's essential infrastructure, from power plants to water treatment systems. Join us, and bring your questions, as we talk about what's ahead.