Other
Commentary
11/8/2006
01:38 PM
Commentary
Commentary
Commentary
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Microsoft's Virtualized Server Software: Take A Test Drive

In This Issue:
1. Editor's Note: Special Report—Live From China
2. Today's Top Story
    - Take A Test Drive Of Microsoft's Virtualized Server Software
    Related Story:
    - HP, VMware Teaming Up To Use Server Virtualization To Replace PCs
3. Breaking News
    - Scattered E-Voting Glitches Reported In Eight States
    - E-Voting Security Scrutinized During Midterm Elections
    - Microsoft Launches 3-D Maps For Web Search
    - AOL Tests APIs For Embedding AIM Into Web Sites
    - New IBM Hybrid Supercomputer Offers Big Performance Jump
    - Microsoft Makes Xbox A Family Machine
    - Antivirus Vendors Miss Stration Worm's Second Spamming Stage
    - Bug Project Calls Out Operating System Vulnerabilities
    - Open Search Initiative Gains New Partners To Give Business Intelligence A Boost
    - Open Source VoIP Takes A Few Steps Forward
    - Adobe Opens Flash Scripting Engine Code
    - Microsoft To Launch Major VoIP Move Early Next Year
    - HP's Software Ambitions Grow As It Closes Mercury Acquisition
    - Intel Packages Blogs, RSS, And Wikis For Businesses
4. Grab Bag
    - Year-End Computer Bug Could Ground Shuttle (The Register)
    - Every Vista PC To Get A Domain Name (APC Magazine)
    - CAN-SPAM Didn't—Not By A Long Shot (Cato @ Liberty)
5. In Depth
    - German Court Orders ISP Logs Destroyed At Customers' Request
    - Can Integrated Security Catch A Thief Or A Terrorist?
    - IBM Unveils Controversial Video Surveillance Technology
    - U.S. Official Urges Stiffer Anti-Spyware Penalties
    - AT&T Names Suspected Pretexters
6. Voice Of Authority
    - Google, Microsoft Pay Top Dollar In India
7. White Papers
    - Business Continuity And Availability In 2007—Surviving The Next Katrina Or Ernesto
8. Get More Out Of InformationWeek
9. Manage Your Newsletter Subscription

Quote of the day:
"Rogues are preferable to imbeciles because they sometimes take a rest." -- Alexandre Dumas


1. Editor's Note: Special Report—Live From China

One of the exciting things about life as an American here in the 21st century is the emergence of developing nations as economic and cultural powerhouses. For most of my life—for most of the 20th century—most Asian nations and other countries in the developing world fell into two categories: military threats, such as Japan, North Vietnam, and North Korea; and objects of pity and charity, such as India, Bangladesh, and China.

Of course, Japan emerged from that threat-or-victim trap after World War II. And now we see many other developing countries, including China, India, and Korea, emerging to stand side-by-side with the United States and Europe as equals and competitors. It's a little bit scary—in the future, I think I'll find my job is as much in danger of outsourcing as any of yours. But mostly it's exciting. It's the dawn of a great era. It's not a clash of civilizations, as we're seeing with some regimes in the Middle East, but rather a meeting of civilizations in cooperation and competition. Asian countries have different cultures, different economic and political systems, and thousands of years of history that's mostly independent of the West. That gives us lots of opportunities to explore and learn from each other.

This week, InformationWeek is doing some exploring of this strange new world, as Editor-at-Large Aaron Ricadela spends some quality time in Beijing soaking up information about the IT industry in China and reporting it back home. Our package of coverage is growing daily all week. It includes:

  • Two posts in Aaron's daily travel journal: "Friendship, Peace, Cooperation, Development" and "Sliced Duck And Sharp Views With Reed Hundt." I expect Aaron will have filed one post more between the time we finish putting together this newsletter and the time you read it. Look for it on the InformationWeek Weblog.

  • Two in a daily series of podcast phone interviews with Aaron. The most recent podcast includes discussion of the travel experience, comparison with Aaron's earlier trip to report on IT India, China's higher education system, getting Internet access, government censorship of the Internet, and former FCC Chairman Reed Hundt's perspective on what the United States needs to do to compete with China. An earlier podcast provides an overview of the trip, recorded while Aaron was still in California. I expect there may be at least one more podcast posted by the time you read this newsletter. Look for it on the InformationWeek Weblog.

  • And we'll have a complete report on IT in China in Monday's issue of InformationWeek, available in print and on InformationWeek.com.

Is China an opportunity or a threat to the U.S. economy? Let us know what you think on the InformationWeek Weblog.

Mitch Wagner
mwagner@cmp.com
www.informationweek.com


2. Today's Top Story

Take A Test Drive Of Microsoft's Virtualized Server Software
Windows Server software is available in a virtualized format for what Microsoft is calling its Test Drive Program.

Related Story:

HP, VMware Teaming Up To Use Server Virtualization To Replace PCs
Instead of employees being given their own computers, they would be served their Microsoft Office applications from a virtual machine in a data center.


3. Breaking News

Scattered E-Voting Glitches Reported In Eight States
The bulk of the problems were reported using touch-screen voting, rather than optical scanning gear, which allows paper-based ballots to be collected even if there are machine glitches.

E-Voting Security Scrutinized During Midterm Elections
Project Vote predicts voting troubles in 33 urban jurisdictions in nine states.

Microsoft Launches 3-D Maps For Web Search
The goal is to beef up local search traffic by offering photo-realistic 3-D models of buildings and landscapes in cities including Los Angeles, Boston, Philadelphia, and Dallas.

AOL Tests APIs For Embedding AIM Into Web Sites
New APIs and AIM Whimsicals let developers embed windows in their pages for sending and receiving IMs. They also integrate functionality into Web sites that lets users set their IM availability, away messages, and profiles.

New IBM Hybrid Supercomputer Offers Big Performance Jump
Indiana University plans to use the new technology, which combines Cell chips with PowerPC chips, to speed molecular research.

Microsoft Makes Xbox A Family Machine
Microsoft is hoping for a larger role in the digital living room by making movies and TV shows available for viewing through the Xbox video game console.

Antivirus Vendors Miss Stration Worm's Second Spamming Stage
Antivirus vendors completely missed the fact that the most massive worm attack in months has a secondary payload that has sent millions of pharmaceutical spam messages, a security intelligence company revealed Tuesday.

Bug Project Calls Out Operating System Vulnerabilities
A new hacker project that promises to disclose one operating system kernel vulnerability daily hasn't yet come up with any serious bugs, a security company said Tuesday, but Gartner warned enterprises that the plan constitutes a security wake-up call.

Open Search Initiative Gains New Partners To Give Business Intelligence A Boost
With the addition of Fast, a scalable enterprise search engine, and Inxight, a provider of enterprise software used in information discovery, business intelligence can be made more useful to more workers.

Open Source VoIP Takes A Few Steps Forward
Several vendors, including Fonality, Digium, and Polycom, unveil new VoIP software, gear, and partnerships designed to move open source telephony into the mainstream.

Adobe Opens Flash Scripting Engine Code
Adobe plans to open the source code for the scripting engine in the Flash Player, which will be incorporated into a new Mozilla open source project called Tamarin.

Microsoft To Launch Major VoIP Move Early Next Year
The VoIP rollout will include videoconferencing and be combined with e-mail, video, and instant messaging technologies.

HP's Software Ambitions Grow As It Closes Mercury Acquisition
HP becomes one of the world's largest software vendors as it folds Mercury into the overall company.

Intel Packages Blogs, RSS, And Wikis For Businesses
Intel says the tools will boost productivity by 50%, speed projects by 25%, and cut e-mail volume by 30%.

All Our Latest News


----- The latest research, polls, and tools -----

Everything You Hate About IT—And Weren't Afraid To Say
For Network Computing's annual reader poll, we asked some hard-hitting questions: Which tech buzzwords do you despise? Who does your IT group regularly bang heads with? What do you really think about SOA? And lots more. Our readers responded with blunt honesty ("Virtualization makes me want to punch the next salesperson who mentions it"). See what else they had to say.

Then dive deep and check out the image gallery with graphical results of 25 poll questions on topics including software pricing trends, vendor support shortcomings, the causes of failed IT projects, and more.

A Personal Approach To The Web
InformationWeek's newest service is MyInformationWeek, a personalization engine that responds to your stated preferences and also uses your click behavior to refine your profile and serve you the most relevant information on every visit. Sign up now.
-----------------------------------------


4. Grab Bag

Year-End Computer Bug Could Ground Shuttle (The Register)
NASA needs to launch the next shuttle mission on time, because if it doesn't get off the ground by Dec. 18, a computer bug could mean the 12-day mission has to slip until January. The shuttle was never expected to be in orbit as one year gives way to another, so the computers aren't set up to switch to a new "Day One." To the shuttle, January 1 is just day 366. That would leave the shuttle out of synch with NASA's ground-based computers.

Every Vista PC To Get A Domain Name (APC Magazine)
Want to be able to access your machine anytime, anywhere? Can't be bothered purchasing a domain name and configuring Dynamic DNS? Microsoft has a solution: the "Windows Internet Computer Name"—a unique domain name for your computer. There's one small catch though: You have to be using the next-generation networking protocol IPv6, which, although thoroughly integrated into Windows Vista, isn't supported by most home routers yet.

CAN-SPAM Didn't—Not By A Long Shot (Cato @ Liberty)
Should Congress or the FTC ramp up enforcement? Increase penalties to bring spammers to heel? No. They should abandon the enterprise entirely and confess their incompetence to regulate the Internet and technology.


5. In Depth

German Court Orders ISP Logs Destroyed At Customers' Request
T-Online must destroy activity logs of users who request the action, unless it can prove legal justification. That will make it difficult to prove piracy among T-Online users.

Can Integrated Security Catch A Thief Or A Terrorist?
IBM, Cisco, and other vendors are introducing systems that combine digital and physical security in an effort to provide a more comprehensive system that's easier for businesses to use.

IBM Unveils Controversial Video Surveillance Technology
The S3 system can be programmed to spot suspicious behavior, such as prolonged lingering at an airport security fence. It could also nab an employee who's spending too much time in the lunchroom.

U.S. Official Urges Stiffer Anti-Spyware Penalties
FTC Commissioner Jon Leibowitz said the agency should be given expanded authority to impose civil fines on spyware distributors.

AT&T Names Suspected Pretexters
The defendants were identified as John Does when AT&T's lawsuit was first filed in August because of a lack of information about their real identities, the company said.


6. Voice Of Authority

Google, Microsoft Pay Top Dollar In India
Paul McDougall says: Thinking of a career in IT? Then don't waste your time on lowly tech services companies. The big bucks are in software development, working for industry giants like Google and Microsoft. In India, that is.


7. White Papers

Business Continuity And Availability In 2007—Surviving The next Katrina Or Ernesto
This white paper outlines the issues underlying any BC&A implementation and offers guidance for reducing risk. It explains how to use service level agreements and data valuation as organizing principles for revitalizing BC&A systems and describes 10 simple steps to maintain support from end users and executive management.


8. Get More Out Of InformationWeek

Try InformationWeek's RSS Feed

Discover all InformationWeek's sites and newsletters

Recommend This Newsletter To A Friend
Do you have friends or colleagues who might enjoy this newsletter? Please forward it to them and point out the subscription page.


9. Manage Your Newsletter Subscription

To unsubscribe from, subscribe to, or change your E-mail address for this newsletter, please visit the InformationWeek Subscription Center.

Note: To change your E-mail address, please subscribe your new address and unsubscribe your old one.

Keep Getting This Newsletter
Don't let future editions of InformationWeek Daily go missing. Take a moment to add the newsletter's address to your anti-spam white list:
InfoWeek@update.informationweek.com

If you're not sure how to do that, ask your administrator or ISP. Or check your anti-spam utility's documentation. Thanks.

We take your privacy very seriously. Please review our Privacy Policy.

InformationWeek Daily Newsletter
A free service of InformationWeek and the TechWeb Network.
Copyright (c) 2006 CMP Technology
600 Community Drive
Manhasset, N.Y. 11030

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
The Business of Going Digital
The Business of Going Digital
Digital business isn't about changing code; it's about changing what legacy sales, distribution, customer service, and product groups do in the new digital age. It's about bringing big data analytics, mobile, social, marketing automation, cloud computing, and the app economy together to launch new products and services. We're seeing new titles in this digital revolution, new responsibilities, new business models, and major shifts in technology spending.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Tech Digest - August 27, 2014
Who wins in cloud price wars? Short answer: not IT. Enterprises don't want bare-bones IaaS. Providers must focus on support, not undercutting rivals.
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Archived InformationWeek Radio
Howard Marks talks about steps to take in choosing the right cloud storage solutions for your IT problems
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.