Mobile
Commentary
12/2/2010
12:25 AM
Ed Hansberry
Ed Hansberry
Commentary
50%
50%

Are Windows Phone 7 Sales Slow?

Windows Phone 7 has been out nearly a month in the US and almost twice as long in much of Europe and we've not heard any official numbers on what the sales figures are. What little we have heard from unofficial sources doesn't sound too good.

Windows Phone 7 has been out nearly a month in the US and almost twice as long in much of Europe and we've not heard any official numbers on what the sales figures are. What little we have heard from unofficial sources doesn't sound too good.The first indication of any volumes came from The Street via a market research report. It claimed that only 40,000 units moved the first day it was on sale in the US. I've not seen anything since to substantiate or refute that claim, so I take it with a grain of salt right now.

Next up comes some anecdotal evidence from a mobile phone retail location in the UK. Mobilesplease claims that they have been selling Android devices over Windows Phone 7 devices 15:1 since the later's launch. What we don't know is how many models of each platform they sell, the comparative price points or any other detailed information. That said, this is still a negative indicator for Microsoft's latest platform.

What really tells me though that there is a problem is that Microsoft isn't releasing any sales figures. Now, one might argue that Microsoft doesn't traditionally release such figures, or generally does so when it publishes its quarterly financial data. The problem with that line of reasoning is Microsoft is going against it with their publication of Kinect sales figures.

The Kinect for the Xbox 360 launched recently and Microsoft has been falling all over itself to get those sales figures out there. In 25 days, Microsoft moved 2.5 million units according to a press release earlier this week.

Again, none of this is definitive, but none of it points to good news for Microsoft. It doesn't mean the platform is on the way out. Far from it. Microsoft has committed half a billion dollars to marketing the platform and it is viewed as an integral part of Microsoft's future. Anyone that compares WP7 to the fate of the Kin doesn't understand the differences between the two platforms. Digitimes is also claiming that Microsoft will move to 5.1 percent of the total phone market. While that is still in the minority, when sales are projected at 350 million smartphones for next year, 5.1 percent is nearly 18 million phones.

I am certain Microsoft is in this for the long haul. It just seems they might need to hunker down and prepare for a rough period until the platform gains traction.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
InformationWeek Elite 100
InformationWeek Elite 100
Our data shows these innovators using digital technology in two key areas: providing better products and cutting costs. Almost half of them expect to introduce a new IT-led product this year, and 46% are using technology to make business processes more efficient.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Tech Digest, Dec. 9, 2014
Apps will make or break the tablet as a work device, but don't shortchange critical factors related to hardware, security, peripherals, and integration.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Archived InformationWeek Radio
Join us for a roundup of the top stories on InformationWeek.com for the week of December 14, 2014. Be here for the show and for the incredible Friday Afternoon Conversation that runs beside the program.
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.