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7/31/2007
10:32 PM
Stephen Wellman
Stephen Wellman
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I Loved My iPhone But I Had To Return It

As you may recall, I finally snagged an iPhone a few weeks ago. At the time, I was less than pleased with my experience. I had problems syncing my iPhone with my PCs. Many of you wrote in with some advice on how to better connect my Jesus-phone with my laptop and desktop. While I appreciated your help, it wasn't enough. After 10 days, I returned my iPhone.

As you may recall, I finally snagged an iPhone a few weeks ago. At the time, I was less than pleased with my experience. I had problems syncing my iPhone with my PCs. Many of you wrote in with some advice on how to better connect my Jesus-phone with my laptop and desktop. While I appreciated your help, it wasn't enough. After 10 days, I returned my iPhone.That's right. I took that beautiful iPhone back. I enjoyed it. I loved it, in fact. But frankly, the iPhone made me want to go out and buy a Mac. And I just couldn't afford to kick down for a Mac (or two) in addition to the iPhone.

I took my iPhone to the local Apple store several times. I played around with the MacBook and the iMac and I wanted so badly to walk home with either (well, really, both) of them. And then connect my iPhone to a brand spanking new Mac.

After numerous trips to the Apple store, I went over to my neighbors to check out his iPhone and Mac spread. I drooled with envy as I watched him sync his iPhone with his iMac. Mac Geek really nailed this issue for me with this comment from a few weeks ago:

The true beauty of Apple is that they make the hardware... and the OS to work seamlessly on that hardware... and software that works seamlessly with both the OS and the hardware. Microsoft makes an OS -- somebody(s) else(s) makes the hardware, And someone(s) with a completely different agenda makes the software. A lot of round pegs/square holes there with a mallet to make it all work. So, yes -- adding an iPhone and iTunes to a Windoze system will require the same mallet that you are used to using.

However -- an iPhone with iTunes on a Mac with Mail/Address Book/Safari IS going to be a seamless experience. Trust me -- get a Mac, everything just works.

Mac Geek is right, but, in the end, I just couldn't rationalize spending another $1,200 just to have a seamless mobile-to-desktop experience.

I have to admit that I miss the iPhone. I now think Apple's real goal with the iPhone was to build a gateway device (or is that drug) designed to make PC users like me convert to the cult and spend all our money on Macs. Well, it almost worked on me.

When I use my Windows machines, they make me ache for a Mac and an iPhone. Maybe, someday, when I can afford to switch, I'll be a proud Mac and iPhone owner. Until then, I'll just make do with my PCs, my Treo, and my less-than-stellar Razr.

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