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1/8/2014
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Mayer's Yahoo Makeover: CES 2014

CEO Marissa Mayer launches new products, showcases a media company emerging from years of rudderless leadership.

CES 2014: 8 Technologies To Watch
CES 2014: 8 Technologies To Watch
(Click image for larger view and slideshow.)

Yahoo is reborn. At CES 2014, CEO Marissa Mayer announced acquisitions and initiatives designed to further the turnaround she began after being appointed to lead the company in July 2012.

Mayer had plenty of star power to attract attention to her initiatives. She was joined by journalists Katie Couric and David Pogue; both recently left jobs in traditional media to help Mayer remake Yahoo as a web and mobile media company. Singer John Legend and cast members from "Saturday Night Live" also appeared.

Mayer made it clear that Yahoo is focused on mobile at least as much as the web, its traditional strength. She announced the acquisition of Aviate, a company that makes a homescreen launcher app for Android devices. Just as Yahoo curates web content, Aviate curates apps -- evidently smartphones now have so many apps that Yahoo believes it can add value through presentation and organization.

No financial terms were disclosed, but investors appear to have already made up their minds about Mayer's ability to revitalize Yahoo: Its stock now sells for about $40 per share, up from $15 per share when Mayer took over.

[On the other hand, this: Yahoo Ads Hack Spreads Malware.]

Mayer also announced the debut of Yahoo News Digest, a news summary app based on Summly, a content summarization app that Yahoo acquired last year.

The app, available for iPhone and iPod Touch, breaks content in "Atoms" and combines them, so that a text summary of an article might be accompanied by a map, infographic, or information extracted from another source. It presents its news summaries, created algorithmically and editorially, twice daily. While Yahoo News Digest won't do much for literacy, its mobile-friendly news morsels should be appreciated by those whose appetite for information is sated with a headline.

Yahoo also launched Yahoo Tech and Yahoo Food, websites modeled after image-heavy magazines, not to mention visually oriented websites like The Verge and Pinterest.

Mike Kerns, senior VP of homepages and verticals at Yahoo, described the web publications in a blog post as an effort to "marry the elegant design and bold imagery of traditional magazines with immersive bite-sized stories, engaging videos, and stunning photos curated from Flickr and across the web."

The two websites lack traditional banner ads. Instead, they contain what Kerns called "native advertising -- that is, articles, videos, and tips that are just as engaging as the stories around them." They are, he said, clearly marked as "sponsored stories," a term Facebook pioneered as a euphemism for "ads."

The two sites are designed so that users never have to leave them. Clicking on a story tile expands the article, which collapses when another tile is clicked. Kerns made a virtue out of this nonstandard navigation paradigm by noting that users don't have to deal with browser tabs, multiple windows, or the "back" button.

Yahoo also revamped its advertising offerings. Yahoo Advertising now includes Tumblr Sponsored Posts, a targeted ad offering called Yahoo Audience Ads, two new ad buying platform offerings -- Yahoo Ad Manager and Ad Manager Plus, and Yahoo Ad Exchange, a global ad marketplace for publishers.

Finally, the company introduced Yahoo Smart TV, a revision of the Yahoo Connected TV platform. The service is available on certain Samsung and Vizio TVs.

Thomas Claburn is editor-at-large for InformationWeek. He has been writing about business and technology since 1996, for publications such as New Architect, PC Computing, InformationWeek, Salon, Wired, and Ziff Davis Smart Business. Before that, he worked in film and television. He's the author of a science fiction novel, Reflecting Fires, and his mobile game Blocfall Free is available for iOSAndroid, and Kindle Fire.

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cbabcock
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cbabcock,
User Rank: Strategist
1/9/2014 | 8:03:37 PM
A major Hadoop contributor
Yahoo had made significant contributions to open source code projects, Apache Hadoop coming most prominently to mind, unlike some large Web companies. I hope it keeps up the practice.
Craig W. Fugagte
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Craig W. Fugagte,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/8/2014 | 9:48:14 PM
Re: Makeover Not Done Yet (I Hope)
 

Yes.  What most Yahoo subscribers likeD about Yahoo, wAs that it wAs mildly retro. 

Now; what; Ichten bichten dichten lichten schtichten? 

 
Shane M. O'Neill
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Shane M. O'Neill,
User Rank: Author
1/8/2014 | 1:49:39 PM
Re: Makeover Not Done Yet (I Hope)
Going broad is a bad idea in tech media and Yahoo Tech's "tech site for normal people" strategy is about as broad as it gets. Problem is, most "normal" people aren't interested enough in tech to read a tech news site regularly and passionately. The other problem is that when you really dig into the Yahoo Tech's content, it's still a site for tech enthusiasts and not that different from The Verge or Engadget, which it scorns for being too geeky. The whole "normal people" premise does not hold water.
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
1/8/2014 | 12:58:05 PM
Re: Makeover Not Done Yet (I Hope)
Ryan Block, former Engadget editor, posted a tongue-in-cheek tweet that aptly summarized the problem with Yahoo Tech: "In other news, my next startup is going to be a sports site for people who don't care about sports. It's going to be incredible"
6 one way half a dozen another
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6 one way half a dozen another,
User Rank: Strategist
1/8/2014 | 12:10:25 PM
Makeover Not Done Yet (I Hope)
I saw the "Tech" desktop page and it is the usual mix of hard and soft (very soft) news, beautifully presented. Now they need to fix some more of the other pages. The News page is still a strange mix of hard breaking news, sports coverage and very soft human interest stories. No filters exist to narrow down topics (e.g. politics). The filters that do allow one to ask for less of a kind of story (by selecting unwanted topics) is a fairly big fail. I continually got stories on topics when I did not want *any* stories on that topic; even to find that all of the offered categories had been selected as "less" topics. The odd jumble of Dear Abby, commentary, sports scores and tweets in a column with world news and wingnuts of both parties is off putting to say the least. It is simply a mess.

After that should come those Shine and OMG! pages (whatever the heck those names are supposed to suggest?).
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