Mobile // Mobile Business
News
8/28/2014
08:06 AM
Jeff Bertolucci
Jeff Bertolucci
Slideshows
Connect Directly
Google+
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

8 Things We Want In iPhone 6

What features rank as most wanted in Apple's soon-to-debut iPhone? Let's talk battery, camera, display, and more.
Previous
1 of 9
Next

(Source: iPhone 6 concept by graphic designer Martin Hajek)
(Source: iPhone 6 concept by graphic designer Martin Hajek)

Here's what we want, Apple
We're coming down to the wire. All signs point to a Sept. 9 launch for Apple's next-generation iPhone, better known by its unofficial moniker, iPhone 6. That's less than two weeks from now, meaning the endless series of iPhone speculation stories (yes, like this one) will soon get a stake through the heart. However, they won't die a vampire's death. Rather, they will rise again this fall, when rumors of the iPhone 7 begin to leak out from Apple's vast supply chain in Asia.

One interesting thing about iPhone rumors is that they invariably focus on hardware specs -- screen size, processor, camera, storage capacity, and so on. It's much easier for Apple to silence chatter on new software, particularly when developed in-house, than it is to keep far-flung suppliers from spilling hardware factoids to eager journalists and analysts.

As a result, we tend to hear far more gossip about Apple's prerelease hardware than its software. A good example of this came at Apple's Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) in June, when senior vice president of software engineering Craig Federighi introduced Swift, a new programming language for creating iOS and Mac OS X apps. Swift took the keynote audience and blogosphere by surprise, as rumors leading up to the event hadn't mentioned it as one of Apple's likely WWDC announcements.

We already know a lot about the iPhone 6, but the handset's precise physical appearance remains something of a mystery. (The slide above isn't a leaked snapshot of the new iPhone -- it's too far too pretty for that -- but rather a conceptual image created by graphic designer Martin Hajek.) One thing is certain: Despite being notably larger than its predecessor, the new model(s) will retain Apple's slim-and-sleek aesthetic.

What else is new? Well, one recent rumor says the larger of the two new iPhones, the one with the 5.5-inch display, will be named the "iPhone 6L" (the L presumably standing for "Large").

It'll be interesting to see how Apple prices the iPhone 6. Will the 5.5-inch model be the premium edition, perhaps with features not available in its 4.7-inch sibling? Or will screen size be the only distinction between the two? Assuming the smaller model has more mainstream appeal -- as it probably will in the North American market, where 5-inch or larger phones (i.e., phablets) aren't as popular as they are in Asia -- the latter option seems likely.

Exlore the slideshow to see the top eight things we want to see from the iPhone 6. And tell us if you agree with our choices.

Jeff Bertolucci is a technology journalist in Los Angeles who writes mostly for Kiplinger's Personal Finance, The Saturday Evening Post, and InformationWeek. View Full Bio

Previous
1 of 9
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
<<   <   Page 3 / 3
D. Henschen
IW Pick
100%
0%
D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
8/28/2014 | 12:19:50 PM
How about a screen that doesn't crack?
Apple has notoriously wimpy sceen glass. Unless you have one of those giant protective cases, you can expect to crack or shatter your screen. How about real Gorilla Glass on the iPhone 6?
melgross
50%
50%
melgross,
User Rank: Ninja
8/28/2014 | 10:39:49 AM
RAM, SoC
It's already been shown that GeekBar was looking at the wrong thing. So it's still possible that 2GB RAM is possible. In fact, for the 9.7" iPad, at least, 2GB seems assured. Will Apple's SoC run at 2.6GHz? That's a good question. There are two types of CPU's. The first is what's called a narrow design, and runs at a high speed. Qualcomm's designs work that way, up to 2.7GHz. The second is called a wide design, and runs on a much slower clock. The A7 is one of those designs. In fact, it's the only major SoC to work that way. Last year, it ran at 1.3GHz for the phone, and 1.4GHz for the ipad. Assumptions that it will run at 2GHz, or higher, are no more than guesses. If Apple were to double the running clock, they would need to make major design changes. Would they do that? Why? As all should know by now, it's not clock speed that tells us anything about performance when comparing two, or more, different processor families. Last year, the clock speed was about the same as the year before, when they still had 32 processing, and a smaller manufacturing process. This year, the process will be smaller still. Apple can use that for more transistors to improve performance, or dramatically increase clock speed. Increasing clock speed by so much would, as mentioned, require major redesign. It would also limit performance increases in the future, as that's getting near the maximum clock speed. Better to increase clock by another small amount, and add to the core designs the way Apple has been doing all along. So I doubt clocks will be over 2GHz this year.
melgross
50%
50%
melgross,
User Rank: Ninja
8/28/2014 | 10:37:16 AM
Re: Unlocked and usable on all carriers out of the box
You can buy those at an Apple Store now.
ANewNickname
50%
50%
ANewNickname,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/28/2014 | 10:32:18 AM
Unlocked and usable on all carriers out of the box
The subject says it all -- it's time to abandon the carrier-centric model. I will sacrifice weight and size for multiple RF gear, if necessary (it shouldn't be), although those might be configured as interchangeable modules. Ideally, the phone would dynamically roam and I would be billed for time only by whatever carrier I was using at the time. I also want no carrier-mandated software other than that required to support the phone's basic functions. Let the market decide on backup, sports apps, etc.
<<   <   Page 3 / 3
InformationWeek Elite 100
InformationWeek Elite 100
Our data shows these innovators using digital technology in two key areas: providing better products and cutting costs. Almost half of them expect to introduce a new IT-led product this year, and 46% are using technology to make business processes more efficient.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Tech Digest, Dec. 9, 2014
Apps will make or break the tablet as a work device, but don't shortchange critical factors related to hardware, security, peripherals, and integration.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Archived InformationWeek Radio
Join us for a roundup of the top stories on InformationWeek.com for the week of December 14, 2014. Be here for the show and for the incredible Friday Afternoon Conversation that runs beside the program.
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.