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1/7/2014
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Intel CEO: 'Make Everything Smart'

"Intel Inside" will take on a whole new meaning in the age of wearable tech and the Internet of Things.
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Intel's Smart Coffee Mug
Intel's Smart Coffee Mug

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Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Author
1/7/2014 | 10:32:18 AM
Where's the demand for wearables?
I love to read about wearable tech and what's coming out of CES is a lot of fun. I have no doubt that some day -- probably sooner than I imagine -- I'll be plopping a handful of smart devices into a charging bowl or something similar. But will smart "things" be mainstream in six years --  by 2020? That seems realistic to me. Anybody agree? 
HarryM982
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HarryM982,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/7/2014 | 10:42:58 AM
MAKE EVERYTHING SMART
Great , more devices with back door access for the NSA

You can keep it
David F. Carr
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David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
1/7/2014 | 11:06:04 AM
Coffee: meet computer
The smart mug would at long last bring peace to the conflict between coffee and computers. I want one.
Tommmmy
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Tommmmy,
User Rank: Strategist
1/7/2014 | 11:06:46 AM
Intel Backdoors Their Products for the NSA
The US Military (the NSA) has required all Internet connected electronic device makers, like Intel, Samsung, HTC, LG, Apple, Google, Sony, HTC, Microsoft, GM, Chrysler, Ford, Honda, etc., to embed backdoor access in all their software & hardware in those products. The NSA has forced these manufacturers to violate the Patriot Act and the 4th Amendment to monitor each of us through our PC's, smart phones, OnStar Systems, tablets, xBox's, Skype, Office 365, DropBox, Carbonite, Google Drive, Laptops, iCloud, SkyDrive, cars, trucks, boats, etc.

But thanks to the heroic freedom-fighter, patriot, and whistle-blower Edward J. Snowden we now know that an army of private contractors and the US Military unlawfully monitors everyone's telephone traffic, all your contact lists, text messages, passwords, GPS locations with dates and time, FaceBook posts & pictures, LinkedIn pages & pictures, your search engine keywords entered (yes – even the keywords typed in but you don't press the enter key), all web sites visited, all your credit card numbers, all your inbound and outbound e-mail messages, your voice-print, and facial image (for facial recognition devices planted around the world used to identify your movement). They have also now installed traffic cameras in all major metro areas and on police cars that scan license plate tags and store that information in databases. Those databases are also shared with the NSA. They store all that information permanently, under your name, at the US Military's new massive Utah Data Center and can pull it up at any time in the future. They can even freely tap into the microphone and/or camera on your smart phone, tablet, laptop, PC, automobile's OnStar system, xBox and similar Internet connected devices. Rest assured – if it connects to the Internet – the US Military can tap into it and illegally monitor you.  And now we have learned they have back door access into all of RSA's encryption tools.
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
1/7/2014 | 11:38:29 AM
IoT Security
Intel inside seems to have been a slogan ahead of its time. There is great danger here for IoT device makers to prey on fears with regards to baby monitoring, and there is great opportunity -- keeping an eye on elderly parents. I envision huge privacy concerns. You thought smartphone security was tricky? Let's talk hackable devices and data streams attached to your parents or kids. I hope Intel has some of its smartest seceurity minds pointed at this. Bruce Schneier argues in Wired today that IoT is "wildly insecure."
Stratustician
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Stratustician,
User Rank: Ninja
1/7/2014 | 2:03:47 PM
Might need a wearable battery too...
Oh dear, I hope the charging bowl is quite large.  The amount of power our poor smartphones will require to keep connected to all these new toys is going to mean super fast draining times.  My smartwatch alone loves to bring my phone down in power pretty quick, so throw in headphones and other contraptions, I'm going to need a bigger battery pack.  The other option is to embed cellular connection into the devices themselves, but then you are looking at a monthly bill to keep it connected.
Shane M. O'Neill
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Shane M. O'Neill,
User Rank: Author
1/7/2014 | 2:53:26 PM
IofT and privacy paranoia
I'm conflicted. On one hand, I want to use smart tech and data to make life easier -- I want my refrigerator to alert me when the milk is about expire. But I'm also paranoid about privacy. If the NSA smartphone snooping and retail data breaches have you worried, how will you feel when half your house is connected to the Internet? Will we just get over it? One thing's for sure, the next couple decades will be a busy time in the internet security business.
rradina
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rradina,
User Rank: Ninja
1/7/2014 | 3:16:07 PM
Re: IofT and privacy paranoia
In my mind the biggest issue with connected devices in my home (appliances, electronics, environmental and bio monitoring) isn't the fact that they are networked but rather the endpoint to which they connect.  I'd prefer some sort of standard that aggregates them to an in-home "controller" that allows me to decide what happens next.  We've long heard about pay content being behind "walled gardens".  I'd like to think my networked stuff is also inside a walled garden where I get to determine the four dubyas (who, what, where and when) regarding sharing.

The idea that every appliance, electronic and bio monitor device connecting to various cloud services which then learn about me is beyond what I'm willing to accept.  Perhaps my views are not common but I am already in a constant and relentless battle to keep the phone quiet during dinner.  It's made me skeptical whenever I share ANY information with an organization.  We need to revise our laws so that beyond the relationship of the moment (i.e. current purchase/service), no organization is allowed future use of the information they've obtained without further consent.  When I receive privacy sharing literature in the mail from various organizations it just makes me angry.  It's an incredible joke and a waste of money because they already don't share my information in ways that I can stop and the ways that they do share information I have no choice.  I cry foul.
Kristin Burnham
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Kristin Burnham,
User Rank: Author
1/7/2014 | 3:37:52 PM
Re: IofT and privacy paranoia
I'm with Shane. Lots of potential to connect us in some really cool ways, but at what price? One parallel may be the way privacy and security has evolved with Facebook. There were more controls two years ago than there are now to protect your privacy. Little by little Facebook has opened it up, and without people making too much of a stink. I wonder if and when people will accept the quid-pro-quo of connected devices and privacy, and whether it will be as much of an issue years from now as it is today.
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
1/7/2014 | 4:13:34 PM
Re: IofT and privacy paranoia
>One thing's for sure, the next couple decades will be a busy time in the internet security business.

"Make everything smart" is another way of saying "make everything more expensive, more complicated, and less secure." Sounds like a plan.
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