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12/27/2013
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What Smartphone Makers Need To Do In 2014

Rectangular slabs of glass and plastic won't cut it with consumers in 2014. Smartphone makers really have to push boundaries to win over the long haul.

10 Best Tablets Of 2013
10 Best Tablets Of 2013
(click image for larger view)

Nearly all smartphones are rectangular slabs of glass and plastic. By and large, they have become conservative and boring. Hardware makers need to work harder to differentiate their products. That began to happen, even if only a little bit, in 2013. Smartphone manufacturers experimented a bit with their devices over the last 12 months, but they will need to be daring and break molds.

One of the more experimental devices released in 2013 was the LG G2. LG took a gamble and moved the volume and screen lock buttons from the sides of the device to the back surface. This broke with years of smartphone design. It didn't pay off for LG. Though the G2 is novel, sales pale in comparison to the Samsung Galaxy S4 and other phones. At least LG tried something new.

LG and Samsung both released curved smartphones this year. The LG G Flex and Samsung Galaxy Round have rounded profiles. Both phones are expensive, hard to get, and not all that practical, but they represent the type of thinking hardware makers need to adopt. More important than the devices themselves are the technologies behind them. They employ curved LCD screens and curved batteries, which have always been flat and rectangular. Neither phone will be a big seller, but they represent the generational shift that's ahead. New materials and new manufacturing techniques will lead to more interesting smartphones.

[Without good software, hardware is useless. See 10 Best Android Apps Of 2013.]

Motorola is doing some interesting work with its Project Ara. Announced in October, Project Ara is an initiative with the goal of developing an ecosystem that creates and supports modular handsets. Motorola wants Ara to do for hardware developers what Android has done for software developers.

Project Ara prototype.(Source: Motorola)
Project Ara prototype.
(Source: Motorola)

Ara devices will be based on an endoskeleton, the structural frame holding all the modules in place. People can add modules -- an extra battery, a new processor, a keyboard, a display -- to the endoskeleton to create their own unique device. This takes Motorola's Moto Maker to the next level.

Motorola has been working on Project Ara for a year and has already completed the technical work to make Ara a reality. It partnered with the Phonebloks community and hopes to offer an alpha version of its Module Developer's Kit (MDK) sometime this winter. Motorola also partnered with 3D Systems, a company based in South Carolina, to back Project Ara. The two companies aim to create a continuous high-speed 3D printing production platform and fulfillment system for the modules needed to build Project Ara devices. As part of the agreement, 3D Systems will amp up its 3D printing facilities to include conductive and functional materials that can be used by Ara smartphones.

Motorola says Project Ara will lower the barrier of entry for hardware makers and result in a vibrant, open community that will let people create unique and compelling devices.

LG, Motorola, and Samsung are already looking to differentiate their hardware, and that's a good thing for the smartphone-buying public. All three companies are taking a new approach to building smartphones that may result in unique and powerful devices. More companies need to do this, lest they be left behind. Sticking with what works will no longer work. Almost all modern smartphones offer the same feature set: good screen, fast processor, access to apps, good camera, LTE 4G, etc. The companies that try new things, push boundaries, and break molds will be the ones that succeed in the long run.

Eric Zeman is a freelance writer for InformationWeek specializing in mobile technologies.

IT is turbocharging BYOD, but mobile security practices lag behind the growing risk. Also in the Mobile Security issue of InformationWeek: These seven factors are shaping the future of identity as we transition to a digital world (free registration required).

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PaulS681
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PaulS681,
User Rank: Ninja
12/27/2013 | 8:06:41 PM
3d printing
Wow... 3D printing to add modules on to your phone? Did I read that correctly?

Like any technology mobile devices need to advance and try new things. This is interesting.
moonwatcher
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moonwatcher,
User Rank: Strategist
12/28/2013 | 10:29:41 AM
I'm not so sure....
Why do you say they need to "innovate"? I'm not so sure they do. Phones might be rectangular plastic and glass "commodities"  but consumers LIKE them this way. The original corded telephone changed very little for 40 years for a reason: customer familiarity with how they worked. I'm not sure consumers will be thrilled having to learn all new button placements, worrying about "modules" that can be removed, or phones that don't look like phones. The rectangular plastic and glass phones continue to sell well and people upgrade on 24 month cycles just like the lemmings the industry wants, so why change a successful business model? Heck, people are loathe to change a known operating system once they are invested in it and instinctively know how to use it, hence the higher rankings of Android and iOS phones and Windows Phones coming in a distant third and the death of Blackberry...If anything, it is the CARRIERS that need to figure out ways to lower costs. The only "growth market" now would be enticing those of us who are not willing to fork over $1000 or more every year until we die just for the convenience of having a Smartphone to actually get one. And while the cost of the phone is part of that equation, it is the monthly or yearly charge from the carriers that we find insurmountable and simply not justifiable for the "bang for the buck". I'm one of those customers: Egads! One that does not have a Smartphone. Most people I know already do such as my niece who makes a bit more than minimum wage and at the end of the year wonders why she can't save any money, yet her "communication bill" is over $1000 - more if you count home internet, and her cable or dish TV (there goes another $1500 out of her potential savings every year). Anyway, back to the original article. Smartphones simply work because everyone knows how to use them to make calls. If in an emergency a poorly designed or differently designed one thwarted someone from making that 911 call in a timely manner, I would say the "standard" design needs to stay. Let them innovate in other ways...say 3-D HDTV photo and video capture, more voice activation, better displays, integration with Google Smartglass and other heads up displays, etc., and yes, Apple needs to make it easier for consumers to change their freaking batteries out,  any other way than by changing the form factor or button layouts. We'll see what manufacturers do, but the lesson learned by the one who strayed should be cautionary. I mean what exactly are YOU wanting to see?
wht
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wht,
User Rank: Strategist
12/28/2013 | 3:54:25 PM
Re: 3d printing
Interesting idea.  However, I would not be willing to pay for the technology required on the phone or for the 3D printer.  My phone and carrier costs are already ridiculous for what benefit I get from them.  If my family didn't insist I have a cell phone with me at all times, I wouldn't have one or maybe use a prepaid cheapie phone just to make emergency calls.  My cell and Internet charges are more than I spend annually on vacations to the beach, which are far more rewarding and enjoyable.
shamika
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shamika,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/28/2013 | 9:00:41 PM
Re: 3d printing
Well this is interesting. I think it is also important to look in to the speed with integrated RAM which will result in bidding farewell.
shamika
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shamika,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/28/2013 | 9:01:30 PM
Re: 3d printing
Further bridging the gap between, Virtual and Physical is also another good concept where the mobile developer can pay more attention.
Gary_EL
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Gary_EL,
User Rank: Ninja
12/28/2013 | 10:37:51 PM
Re: I'm not so sure....
Thank you, Moonwatcher, for having the courage to say it. The basic design doesn't need to change. We shouldn't have to spend upwards of $1,000 a year on our communications "needs." We want it to stay familiar, just like the landline handset, so If we need to make a 911 call, we can do it evn if we super-stressed or even paniky. I don't own a smartphone either, even though I fairly live on the internet while I'm at home. I'm only going to buy one because: one of my bosses says I need to, there's a great free app available in my city thatsays when the bus is coming, and I want to know where I can find my friends on weekend nights. Even that will set me back $35/month - well, really only about $27 or $27 because I'll ditch my cheapie cell phone plan.
danielcawrey
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danielcawrey,
User Rank: Ninja
12/29/2013 | 11:51:56 AM
Re: 3d printing
The idea that the smartphone is just a rectangular sqaure needs to be upended.

Sure, this form factor has worked well over the past few years. But innovation must take hold and give consumers something new. I like the idea of curved and modular phones, and I think that there is a big market for things like this. At least early adopters can get the ball rolling. 
J_Brandt
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J_Brandt,
User Rank: Ninja
12/30/2013 | 12:21:49 PM
Re: 3d printing
I think the traditional phone may dissolve into multiple parts.  The traditional rectangle, but augmented by and connected to a watch and/or glasses.
jgherbert
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jgherbert,
User Rank: Ninja
12/30/2013 | 4:24:40 PM
Re: 3d printing
@J_Brandt: "I think the traditional phone may dissolve into multiple parts.  The traditional rectangle, but augmented by and connected to a watch and/or glasses"

 

Well, I agree that this is the most logical step for the products to take, and we know that integration with watches, at least, is a hot topic for manufacturers right now. Sadly, from the things we've seen over the last year, it seems that flexible screens and curved screens are likely to appear, perhaps as more of a fashion statement than an actual technical need. Right now I'm struggling to think of what's actually wrong with my current rectangular phone, and how curves or flexing would fix that without introducing other problems at the same time.
Li Tan
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Li Tan,
User Rank: Ninja
1/2/2014 | 1:41:14 AM
Re: 3d printing
I have the same concern here. Although the mobile watch, etc. sounds really cool, the curve LCD is still a problem. The technology advancement is really amazing in the past few years but is the soft LCD display really robust enough? After bending, can it perform as usual? How about the durability? There are a lot of questions to be answered before we can put in a plug for it.
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