Mobile // Mobile Devices
News
9/20/2011
08:10 PM
Mat Lee
Mat Lee
Slideshows
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%
Repost This

HP TouchPad: Teardown

The tablet that won't stay dead returns. If you want to know what's inside, here's an autopsy--that is, a teardown--right down to the guts of the HP TouchPad.
Previous
1 of 12
Next


When HP killed its new HP TouchPad on August 17, less than two months after launch, BYTE was surprised. You'd think HP would've ridden it through the holidays. But the clunky tablet just wasn't selling and HP wanted out of the consumer biz, execs said.

Then HP threw us for a loop. It and its countless retailers and online stores started selling the $400 plus tablet at fire sale prices starting at $99. And it sold like crazy. Digitimes reports HP sold out of its 800,000 to 1 million devices in the channel.

But wait, there's more--literally. The same sources at Digitimes, in Taiwan, say HP is planning to use up remaining components and build between 100,000 and 200,000 more TouchPads. For a dead product, the HP TouchPad is getting quite the install base. HP should rename it The Zombie.

If you're curious about what's inside, don't pry your TouchPad open. Soon it'll be dead for real. Instead, let BYTE and our colleagues at UBM TechInsights wield the scalpel for you. Here we go.

Previous
1 of 12
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Building A Mobile Business Mindset
Building A Mobile Business Mindset
Among 688 respondents, 46% have deployed mobile apps, with an additional 24% planning to in the next year. Soon all apps will look like mobile apps and it's past time for those with no plans to get cracking.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Government, May 2014
Protecting Critical Infrastructure: A New Approach NIST's cyber-security framework gives critical-infrastructure operators a new tool to assess readiness. But will operators put this voluntary framework to work?
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Audio Interviews
Archived Audio Interviews
GE is a leader in combining connected devices and advanced analytics in pursuit of practical goals like less downtime, lower operating costs, and higher throughput. At GIO Power & Water, CIO Jim Fowler is part of the team exploring how to apply these techniques to some of the world's essential infrastructure, from power plants to water treatment systems. Join us, and bring your questions, as we talk about what's ahead.