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4/29/2014
01:10 PM
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MacBook Air Update: More Battery, Less Cash

Apple MacBook Air refresh features faster processors, longer battery life, and lower price points.

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Apple updated its line of MacBook Air computers Tuesday with speedier processors, longer battery life, and lower price points. The MacBook Air moves up to Intel's Haswell chips, and the entire lineup sees price points dropped by $100.

The new processors are the fourth-generation Core i5 and Core i7 chips from Intel. The base configuration for both the 11-inch and 13-inch models is a dual-core i5 chip clocked at 1.4 GHz (plus TurboBoost up to 2.7 GHz), with Intel HD Graphics 5000, 4 GB of RAM, and a 128-GB internal solid-state hard drive. This setup is more power efficient and helps improve battery life across the board.

The 11-inch model now supports up to nine hours of usable uptime, and the 13-inch model supports up to 12 hours. That means most professionals can easily get through an entire work day. The battery life gains are realized in iTunes playback. The laptops can now play music or movies for the full nine and 12 hours of battery life offered by the laptops, respectively. According to Apple, the processor and graphics specs allow the MacBook Air to support dual displays (external monitor up to 2,560 x 1,600 pixels) and video mirroring. Customers may upgrade to Intel's 1.7-GHz Core i7 chip (plus TurboBoost up to 3.3 GHz) for an extra $150.

[Is the iPhone saving Apple's bacon? See Apple iPhone Sales Lead To Record Quarter.]

The 11-inch MacBook Air with the 1.4-GHz processor costs $899. Doubling the SSD HD to 256 GB costs an extra $200, and Apple charges $100 to double the RAM to 8 GB. The 13-inch MacBook Air now starts at $999 with the base processor, storage, and RAM. Upgrading the storage and RAM cost $200 and $100, respectively.

Other MacBook Air specs include two USB 3.0 ports, one Mini DisplayPort, one Thunderbolt port, a headphone jack, and dual mics. The 13-inch model sports a slot for SD cards. The 11-inch model weighs 2.38 pounds and the 13-inch model weighs 2.96 pounds. Apple's laptops ship with OS X Mavericks installed, along with Apple's core iLife and iWork software suites.

"With MacBook Air starting at $899, there's no reason to settle for anything less than a Mac," Philip Schiller, Apple's senior vice president of worldwide marketing, said in a press release. "Macs have never been more popular, and today we've boosted the performance and lowered the price of MacBook Air so even more people can experience the perfect everyday notebook."

The timing for the update is curious. Apple typically updates its portables in June, often during its Worldwide Developers Conference. This year's WWDC is scheduled to kick off June 2. Last year, Apple unveiled an updated MacBook Air and updated MacBook Pros. Many are hoping to see updated hardware again this year, but Tuesday's announcement throws a bit of cold water on hopes for redesigned MacBook Airs.

Separate reports suggest that Apple plans to launch an entirely new portable at this year's WWDC. The device in question is thought to offer a 12-inch Retina Display (actual resolution unknown). The 13-inch MacBook Air's 1,400 x 900-pixel screen doesn't even qualify as a full HD panel, and many are hoping Apple makes the big jump to Retina with its next-generation ultra-portables.

It's entirely possible that Apple plans no other updates for its MacBook Airs and wanted to get them into its lineup sooner than the WWDC. This makes sense, as long as Apple has a surprise in store for its developer conference. During its recent earnings call with analysts, Apple CEO Tim Cook did say that new products are "closer than ever."

Could the growing movement toward open source hardware rewrite the rules for computer and networking hardware the way Linux, Apache, and Android have for software? Also in the Open Source Hardware issue of InformationWeek: Mark Hurd explains his "once-in-a-career opportunity" at Oracle.

Eric is a freelance writer for InformationWeek specializing in mobile technologies. View Full Bio

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Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
4/29/2014 | 1:29:18 PM
Chrome pressure
Do you think pressure from new Chromebooks is partly responsible for the downward movement in pricing? Not that a Chrombook can do what a Macbook can, but the battery life and compact size are comparable and for some use cases -- esp in education -- there is competition there.
Eric Zeman
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Eric Zeman,
User Rank: Strategist
4/29/2014 | 2:46:23 PM
Re: Chrome pressure
Personally, I think it is so Apple has room to price the rumored 12-inch Retina MacBook Air in the $1200 - $1500 range.
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
4/29/2014 | 3:40:13 PM
Re: Chrome pressure
Yes, that's probably more likely!
jgherbert
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jgherbert,
User Rank: Ninja
4/30/2014 | 12:16:12 AM
Re: Chrome pressure

"Do you think pressure from new Chromebooks is partly responsible for the downward movement in pricing?"

 

Personally, no - not in the slightest. I don't believe that Chromebooks are even a blip on the radar for the MacBook Air. They aren't even on the same planet. Now, if you want to ask if there's any pressure from Intel-based Ultrabooks, well, perhaps. But that hasn't had much impact on Apple's pricing in the past, so... the most likely reason may be to juggle pricing due to new models on the horizon. I can't see Apple suddenly getting worried about other platforms like that.

Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Ninja
5/1/2014 | 4:48:58 AM
Chromebooks are not a problem for Apple
Lorna, 

"Do you think pressure from new Chromebooks is partly responsible for the downward movement in pricing?"

Chromebooks don't represent any threat to Apple. Actually, no other laptop does. Electronics components are cheaper. Pricing the MacBook Airs $100 cheaper is an excellent move. As it was stated, there is no reason for not getting the best on the market when you can get the best for $899. 

-Susan 
Li Tan
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Li Tan,
User Rank: Ninja
5/4/2014 | 9:32:19 PM
Re: Chromebooks are not a problem for Apple
This is really the case - Apple notebook is considered as high-end product in the laptop market. Lowering the price a little bit with more feature-rich product is defnitely a correct action. Chromebook and other laptops are not really competitors for Apple at this for the moment.
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Ninja
5/5/2014 | 12:13:25 AM
Re: Chromebooks are not a problem for Apple
Li Tan, 

This new MacBook Air is going to sell really well. Chrombook and the other laptops can't ever be compared with Apple laptops. They are a different world type of products. 

-Susan 
Li Tan
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Li Tan,
User Rank: Ninja
5/9/2014 | 4:10:36 AM
Re: Chromebooks are not a problem for Apple
Susan, I do agree on your point - this is a fantasy product and will have a good sell. Actually I am interested to get new one. 
asksqn
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asksqn,
User Rank: Ninja
4/29/2014 | 4:43:54 PM
Pass on the overpriced iGarbage
"With MacBook Air starting at $899, there's no reason to settle for anything less than a Mac [...]"

Really, Mr. Schiller? How about a beater laptop with a Linux distro installed that does not require the gargantuan HDD/RAM that a Mac does?  

 
jgherbert
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50%
jgherbert,
User Rank: Ninja
4/30/2014 | 12:20:54 AM
Re: Pass on the overpriced iGarbage
"Really, Mr. Schiller? How about a beater laptop with a Linux distro installed that does not require the gargantuan HDD/RAM that a Mac does?"

 

Oh goody, reductio ad absurdum plays a card again.



Q: "How do I fix this Windows problem?"

A: "Install linux"

 

*yawn* If you're happy with that nonsense, buy a Chromebook. I use both Mac Windows and linux. I save linux for servers because the GUI still sucks in my opinion. For the Mac and Windows machines, I like them both well enough, and for right or wrong, I'd choose both over linux as my daily desktop.
jakefunnyman
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50%
jakefunnyman,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/4/2014 | 5:57:21 PM
Specs?
The battery life specs that you mentioned are the same as the Mid 2013 MBAs and the Mid 2013 also had the Haswell CPU.
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